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rfisher
05-31-2011, 07:09 PM
You're a better reader than I am. When the book doesn't engage me and I want to know the end, I just read the ending. :shuffle:

Artemis@BC
05-31-2011, 07:21 PM
You're a better reader than I am. When the book doesn't engage me and I want to know the end, I just read the ending. :shuffle:

Nothin' wrong with that. Life is too short to waste valuable reading time, IMO.

genevieve
05-31-2011, 09:50 PM
You're a better reader than I am. When the book doesn't engage me and I want to know the end, I just read the ending. :shuffle:

I never do that - if I'm disengaged to the point I'm not willing to keep reading, I just put it down and down bother with how it ends.

I still have no idea if the hostages made it out in Bel Canto...but I've got a pretty good idea

emason
05-31-2011, 10:04 PM
I still have no idea if the hostages made it out in Bel Canto...but I've got a pretty good idea

It's nice to know I'm not the only one who stopped in the middle and never went back.

Grannyfan
05-31-2011, 11:23 PM
Finished In the Garden of Beasts. Very interesting, but sad, too. It can't help but make you wonder, "What if . . ."

Just started Major Pettigrew's Last Stand. Very enjoyable so far.

Nomad
06-01-2011, 04:58 AM
Just finished Death Comes for the Archbishop and, once again, feel that the $75 I paid for the two volume Library of America edition of her novels/short stories was money well spent. I know I will want to read that novel again.

For a complete change of pace, I've decided to reread Gentlemen Prefer Blondes by Anita Loos. Lorelei, on drowning her sorrows in champagne: "I mean champagne always makes me feel philosophical because it makes me realize that when a girl's life is as full of fate as mine seems to be, there is nothing else to do about it." Words to live by.

VIETgrlTerifa
06-01-2011, 05:19 PM
I never do that - if I'm disengaged to the point I'm not willing to keep reading, I just put it down and down bother with how it ends.

I still have no idea if the hostages made it out in Bel Canto...but I've got a pretty good idea

I think I love you and emason.

I had to read Bel Canto for a class. While most of the class seemed to love it, I was just bored with it. (When the professor asked us if we preferred that or Olive Kitteridge, I was one of the few who said Olive Kitteridge was superior). Not that it didn't have great parallels or interesting ideas, but it just wasn't engaging. I did read till the end though because my grade depended on it.

Matryeshka
06-01-2011, 06:14 PM
Spoiler for end of Bel Canto: The Government of Unnamed Country breaks in. The terrorists die. The Japanese business guy who's name I can't remember dies in the struggle as well. Gen tries to save Carmen, and in true melodramatic schlock, cannot get to her in time. Gen and Rose get married. It's very eye-rolling. To me, the book was overly plotted, if that makes sense. Too deliberate. There was no sense of life to it whatsoever, none of the urgency you should feel in that situation. I also don't think it was researched at all and she just watched a bunch of action movies one week-end on Starz.

Took a break from A Song of Ice and Fire and read the fifth installment of the Nicholas Flemel series (YA). It was OK, the plot is kind of dragged down by the introduction of yet more characters, trying to be deeper than it really needs to be, and a few SURPRISE! moments that just had me going, really?

Ozzisk8tr
06-01-2011, 07:30 PM
Any James Rollins fans here? Or is he too mainstream for FSUsers?

Prancer
06-01-2011, 09:43 PM
To me, the book was overly plotted, if that makes sense. Too deliberate. There was no sense of life to it whatsoever

I didn't think that part alone was much of a spoiler, so I left the tags off.:)

I haven't read Bel Canto, but I read another book of Ann Patchett's and that was exactly what I thought of it as well. Some authors are better at plot than character and I think she is one of them. Her characters don't seem alive and real, so it's difficult to get into them.

IceAlisa
06-01-2011, 09:51 PM
Reading and enjoying Human Croquet. So strange and haunting. Me like.

genevieve
06-01-2011, 10:10 PM
I read Ann Patchett's Run last year and enjoyed it - but it was a very short book. I tried to reread The Magician's Wife (which took me a while to get into but I ended up loving when I read it 10+ years ago) right after, and realized that Patchett specializes in creating moody explorations of her characters' every thought process, but where NOTHING EVER HAPPENS. Even when something does happen, we're so busy finding out exactly what everyone thinks about it that the action disappears into a fetid pool of contemplation.

I think I saw she's coming out with a new book soon...I do't think I'll be getting it.

Prancer
06-02-2011, 01:21 AM
Patchett specializes in creating moody explorations of her characters' every thought process, but where NOTHING EVER HAPPENS. Even when something does happen, we're so busy finding out exactly what everyone thinks about it that the action disappears into a fetid pool of contemplation.

But somehow, this doesn't translate into good characterizations. I don't know what it is, but it's kind of like you can read all those thoughts and get nothing out of it.

VIETgrlTerifa
06-02-2011, 01:27 AM
Right. It all seems very surface level with her characters. It's like she has the characters and the tools to get something truly interesting, but she doesn't really get there even though she's obviously trying. While reading Bel Canto, nothing truly helped me really get anything deep in the characters or at least want to search for anything meaningful other than the obvious opera character parallels.

genevieve
06-03-2011, 03:53 PM
Even though I'm kind of dying to start Catching Fire (that's the 2nd Hunger Games book, right?), I am making myself finish the books I already bought. Ok, I might skip the 4th one :shuffle: but I have to at least get through the current one or I won't pick it back up. It's a mystery called What the Dead Know by Laura Lippman, and it's both really engrossing and a little frustrating.



..At this point I'm determined to get through it - if only to see if the twist I've been imagining since the beginning is true, or something close at least.
The twist was exactly what I expected it to be from the very start :HA!: Although the how of it was a bit surprising - if only because it was so underwhelming. And the wrap up/epilogue was :duh: One line in particular kinda ruined the whole book for me - the plot revolved around 2 sisters kidnapped in 1975. turns out the older one was lured by a young man into running away and getting married, but the younger one followed her. the guy killed the younger one, called his dad - a retired cop - who came and decided the best solution was for the older one to come live with their family as if she was the son's wife, while also finishing high school under an assumed name. The son raped her every night for 6 years while the parents turned their collective cheek but otherwise she was paraded around as their long lost niece. She did not try to run away even though she was completely away from the family lots and lots of times, but at the age of 21 the dad gave her money and told her to leave. She never tried to contact her family even though she apparently never left the greater eastern seaboard area.

the clincher was at the end, where the surviving girl and her mother talking about how wrong it was for evil dad to enter a girl into servitude to cover for his son and the mom says the girls' (deceased) dad would have done the same thing for his daughters if they'd been in that kind of trouble, because parents will do anything to protect their kids. Really?!?! :wall:

yay, now I can go get Hunger Games 2.0!