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rfisher
05-28-2011, 05:59 PM
I started with Case Histories since it's the first in the series. Have you read this one? I think you'll be able to figure out whodunnit early on but that's not the point. One Good Turn is the book I remember least. My favorites are Case Histories and When Will There Be Good News.

IIRC, I liked One Good Turn although less than the other two. But I did like it.

.

I'm listening to When will there be good news in the car. It's still on the first disc so apart from a seemingly random stabbing, nothing much as happened. :lol: I presume it wasn't as random as it seemed?

Buzz
05-28-2011, 06:09 PM
Finally watched the tv series "Pillars of the Earth" and now I want to read the book. :D

IceAlisa
05-28-2011, 07:30 PM
I'm listening to When will there be good news in the car. It's still on the first disc so apart from a seemingly random stabbing, nothing much as happened. :lol: I presume it wasn't as random as it seemed?

You know I don't remember whether it was random. All I remember is a kickass female character. I liked that book. Nothing much happens in her novels and the murder is rarely shown live like it was in this case but that's what I like about her writing. It's not the action but the characters and the narrative that I enjoy most, not the whoddunit. And you so desperately want her "good guys" to succeed, she really makes you care.

For those of you who like this "different kind of murder mystery" genre, check out Tana French In The Woods and especially The Likeness. WRT to the latter major suspense of disbelief is required but it's a good book otherwise. Just avoid her Faithful Place. I found it completely unreadable and sold my copy on amazon after 20 pages.

TygerLily
05-28-2011, 08:32 PM
Tana French In The Woods On your recommendation, I ordered this one through the library. THe copy was so grossly mildewy I had to return it right away. :wuzrobbed It also made me want to buy an e-reader.


ETA: another recommendation to begin Atkinson with Case Histories

IceAlisa
05-28-2011, 08:41 PM
On your recommendation, I ordered this one through the library. THe copy was so grossly mildewy I had to return it right away. :wuzrobbed It also made me want to buy an e-reader.


Yuck. I didn't know libraries could be a health hazard.

TygerLily
05-28-2011, 08:42 PM
Yeah, it was truly disgusting.

galaxygirl
05-29-2011, 12:08 AM
Yuck. I didn't know libraries could be a health hazard.

I like to read in bed, so I always wipe down the covers of library books with alcohol and toilet paper beforehand. Sometimes, the amount of dirt of the toilet paper afterwards... :yikes:

Nomad
05-29-2011, 12:45 PM
I like to read in bed, so I always wipe down the covers of library books with alcohol and toilet paper beforehand. Sometimes, the amount of dirt of the toilet paper afterwards... :yikes:

I do something similar with my own books twice a year, in addition to to dusting them on a semi-regular basis. It's a major project because I have so damned many, but, like you, I read in bed a lot, so I like them to be clean.

Death Comes for the Archbishop is going rather slowly. It reminds me of Babbitt in that Cather could have put the scenes in a different order and it would not have made much difference to the story, but it's full of beautiful descriptions of the Southwestern landscape, one of the things I particularly liked about The Song of the Lark.

Artemis@BC
05-30-2011, 05:44 PM
Ok, I loved, loved, loved The Stupidest Angel. Just what I would expect from a modern gothic Christmas story written by Christopher Moore. Favourite line (chanted by the zombies the angel accidently creates with his stupidity): "First we feast ... then IKEA." :rofl:

I'm now a few chapters into Best Laid Plans by Terry Follis, a political satire. So far so good. Gotta love a book that begins with a sex scene described in parliamentary language (can't remember the details but there were references to "caucus," "backbench," "parliamentary procedure," "point of order," etc.).

IceAlisa
05-30-2011, 07:43 PM
I finished Started Early Took My Dog and being in the mood for more Kate Atkinson I dug into my stash and came up with Human Croquet (http://www.amazon.com/Human-Croquet-Novel-Kate-Atkinson/dp/0312186886/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1306781040&sr=1-1). So far I like it--atmospheric, ironic and intriguing.

After this I feel another Joyce Carol Oates binge coming on. Thank goodness I am well-stocked and thank goodness for this prolific lady. I think it's going to be Black Water (http://www.amazon.com/Black-Water-Contemporary-Fiction-Plume/dp/0452269865/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1306781376&sr=1-1) and Wild Nights (http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Nights-Stories-Dickinson-Hemingway/dp/B003156CNA/ref=sr_1_3?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1306781235&sr=1-3).

ETA: A friend is recommending The Yacoubian Building by Alaa Al Aswany (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060878134) Is anyone familiar with this book?

PrincessLeppard
05-31-2011, 12:27 AM
I'm reading Zombie, Ohio. I keep waiting for Prancer's little friend to turn up. :EVILLE:

zaphyre14
05-31-2011, 03:53 PM
I read Patricia Briggs' "Hunting Ground" yesterday (it was too humid to move!) and liked it for the slightly varied take on werewolf culture. I'd read the first one of the series "Cry Wolf" over vacation, having picked it up in an airport when I mistakenly left one of the two books I'd brought with in the seat pocket of the first plane. I've read some of Brigg's stuff before and I think this is the series I like best.

I then started Kate Quinn's "Mistress of Rome." It's set at the beginning of Domitian's reign, the main characters are a young spoiled girl on the lookout for a weathy higher-born husband, her slave girl and a "barbarian" Briton gladiator. The POV shifts are a bit abrupt but it's interesting so far.

In the car, I just finished one of the earlier Reacher novels; the abridgment was obvious and choppy but the story was good. I have one from the library. Now that the weather's good enough to roll the windows down, I wonder if the people in traffic with me can hear my audio books the way I can other cars' music - and what the people might think when the audible phrase is something like "...and then blew his head clear off.." :)

genevieve
05-31-2011, 04:22 PM
Even though I'm kind of dying to start Catching Fire (that's the 2nd Hunger Games book, right?), I am making myself finish the books I already bought. Ok, I might skip the 4th one :shuffle: but I have to at least get through the current one or I won't pick it back up. It's a mystery called What the Dead Know by Laura Lippman, and it's both really engrossing and a little frustrating. I'm pretty sure in a couple years (or maybe months :shuffle: I'll be trying to remember the title of that quirky book I read...

The book shifts focus on characters (nothing is told first person, but we see scenes from various characters' POV), and there are alternating sections in completely different times. Because I do a lot of reading before bed, I've had to go back and re-read parts because something will come up that looks vaguely familiar but it's not totally ringing a bell.

I'm also reminded that, in this day and age, name checking technology is certain to date your book to a very tiny window of time. This was published in 2007, and there was a passage going on about how this is the age of iPods and Tivo, and I paused to think "does anyone use Tivo anymore?". Even iPods have almost been replaced by smartphones. It's like a book written in the '70s that talks about the wave of the future in 8-track cassettes. :P

rfisher
05-31-2011, 04:41 PM
I like most of Lippman's Tess Monaghan books, but her other stuff is annoying. I didn't get past the 2nd chapter of What the Dead Know.

genevieve
05-31-2011, 04:46 PM
It does get better than the original set up, but there are also a ton of stereotypes that are more than a little eye-rolling. At this point I'm determined to get through it - if only to see if the twist I've been imagining since the beginning is true, or something close at least. The book did introduce a neat little twist that I didn't see coming in a fairly deft way halfway through the book, so I have hopes.