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pat c
04-13-2011, 02:21 AM
They'll be good again when Patricia Cornwell finally gets some effective treatment for depression. Until then :scream:

And get rid of all the crap about her niece.........do I care she has rotten luck in her love life. Keep to the story.


Scarpetta Factor (and many of the other recent ones) was :scream: , but the most recent, Port Mortuary, is actually much improved. Ooops, I should read to the end of the thread before commenting. ;)


Uh huh. I used to read Rita Mae Brown and sneaky pie. Light, fluffy, cutesy mysteries. Then it went a little too far - to totally unbelievable rather than cute and fluffy.

So much for that. ;)

rjblue
04-13-2011, 02:45 AM
I usually won't accept when people try to lend me a book to read. I like to eat doritos, break spines, dogear, and lay them open at the point I've stopped reading. I also prefer not to lend my books, because I'm going to read it again, if I liked it. And I wouldn't lend a book I didn't like. I'm a hoarder.

I'm really enjoying using the internet to buy books I've always wanted to read, but have never found in a book store. The one I'm waiting for now is More Than Human (http://www.amazon.com/More-Than-Human-Theodore-Sturgeon/dp/0375703713/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_1), by Theodore Sturgeon.

jen_faith
04-13-2011, 02:53 AM
I usually won't accept when people try to lend me a book to read. I like to eat doritos, break spines, dogear, and lay them open at the point I've stopped reading.


Yeah me too. I also dogear them... don't care. They're my books and I'll treat them as I want to. The only ones I really take care of are the big expensive "coffee table" type books on history or art or the really old ones.

Have read most of A Prince of Nothing (http://www.amazon.com/Darkness-Comes-Before-Prince-Nothing/dp/1585675598) that was supposed to be a non-formulaic high fantasy series. Almost without exception, every single character was a jerk or fool in some way. I am not going to read the rest of the series. I need someone to root for, even if he/she is an anti-hero of some sort. Anti-hero I can handle, unmitigated ass I draw the line at.

So the search continues to find some fluff that is not too fluffy but not to mentally or intellectually taxing. Meh...

Matryeshka
04-13-2011, 03:32 AM
I like my books to stay in pristine condition. He doesn't quite get it but is respectful. Other people I know really don't get it. "But M_M, I like when my books get worn because then people know that I read them." I really do not get that line of thinking at all. I don't care if people know whether or not I read a book. I just want them to remain nice and in as close to state they were in when I brought them from the bookstore as possible.


I totally respect your viewpoint, so this is NOT a criticism, but let me see if I can explain the other viewpoint. To me, books were meant to be read. I like seeing that books are used for that purpose. I agree it's silly, but then, I'm kind of a silly person. :P Books to me are comforting, I like to be comfortable when I read them. When I see books in a pristine condition, it's hard for me to imagine someone else enjoying them (which again I get is goofy on my part).

I also like to borrow books from other book desecrators. I like seeing what pages have been dogeared and flipped to again and again--I imagine that it shows something about both my personality and their personality. A friend of mine and I have wildly different taste in books, except for Harry Potter and The Black Jewels. We swapped books once, and it was kind of neat to notice what parts she clearly read over and over compared to what I read over and over.

made_in_canada
04-13-2011, 04:04 AM
I agree Matry! I understand that not everyone feels the same way but I like the character of books that are dog-eared and well worn. Some of my favourite books from childhood when I open them now bring me back to reading underneath my covers until the wee hours of the morning with a flashlight so I wouldn't get caught. The smells in the pages, the marks, its all history to me.

I was recently given a few of my great great-grandmothers books from the 1880's. I cherish those books in large part because of her very neat precise handwritten commentary in the margins and the the writing on the first page declaring the occasion of the gift. I can tell which ones have been re-read over and over again. I like that.

dinakt
04-13-2011, 04:39 AM
I prefer not to dog- ear ( I do it, but rarely, and only in paperbacks I own), but alas, pristine condition is not for me. If I love a book, I'll eat with it, walk with it, sleep with it, take to a park, cafe, transport. They wear out, and I don't mind, as long as I don't mistreat it ( spilled liquids or torn binding... then I regret it). Don't mind borrowing and loaning, but am more careful with borrowed books. Love worn-out books, old editions, especially if it is something obscure that I consider special to me personally.
Interesting to see how different we all are:)

skateycat
04-15-2011, 03:40 AM
Little skateycat is enjoying The ABCs of Rock (http://www.amazon.com/ABCs-Rock-Melissa-Duke-Mooney/dp/1582462933).

rfisher
04-18-2011, 12:43 AM
Just finished Pray for Silence by Linda Castillo. This is the second in her Amish police thrillers. Fast read that didn't bore me in 20 seconds. My only complaint is she writes in first person present tense which annoys me and she spent too much time ruminating about how the lead character commiserated with one of the victims. I think if she'd written this in 3rd person and made that connection a bit of a surprise, it would have been better. Castillo is working on a 3rd book in the series. For peaceful Amish in rural Ohio, they seem to have an extraordinary amount of murders occurring in their little hamlet. Of course, it's those heathen Englishers who seem to do most of the killing.

zaphyre14
04-19-2011, 08:34 PM
I finished "Treachery in Death" and enjoyed it but have immediately forgotten the plot. I also whipped through Anne Bishop's "Twilight's Dawn" - the short vesrions just don't have the same impact as the first volumes of the series did for me but "Dawn does seem to tie things up neatly and I can move on to other worlds without wondering what happened to those people.

I'm now plowing through Morton's Domesday Book mysteries. In the car, I got through the first cassette of Jackie Collins' "Lethal Seduction" before her voice and the inane plot stopped me cold. I'll move on to one of the three Lee Childs' mysteries the library had on hand.

I'm trying to decide which books to take on vacation with me.

rfisher
04-19-2011, 08:45 PM
Reacher still rules even if Prancer hates Lee Childs now.

Wyliefan
04-20-2011, 12:51 AM
The Help trailer is out (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e_yiv4jqW_0&feature=player_embedded)! (I figured this was the best place to put it, since we don't have a thread yet for summer movies, and since so many of us read the book.)

I honestly don't know what to think of it. It almost looks like . . . a comedy? Well, not quite a comedy, but lighter and fluffier than the book. Maybe that's just how they put the trailer together. I hope so.

skateycat
04-20-2011, 01:57 AM
Little skateycat is enjoying The ABCs of Rock (http://www.amazon.com/ABCs-Rock-Melissa-Duke-Mooney/dp/1582462933).

I also like the Marvelous Land of Oz and I love emoticons on Figure Skating Universe!

:gallopin1:gallopin1:gallopin1:BNS1::BNS1::BNS1:
:cat::cat::cat::cat::cat::cold::fsu10::fsu10: :soapbox:

This computer hijacked by little skateycat!

Prancer
04-20-2011, 03:21 AM
For peaceful Amish in rural Ohio, they seem to have an extraordinary amount of murders occurring in their little hamlet. Of course, it's those heathen Englishers who seem to do most of the killing.

Especially if you combine her books with those of P.L. Gaus.

Some enterprising souls around Millersburg have seized on this trend and now offer murder mystery weekends. :lol:

Spinner
04-20-2011, 03:56 AM
Read Graham Joyce's The Silent Land (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Silent-Land/Graham-Joyce/e/9780385533805/?itm=2&USRI=the+silent+land) over the weekend. It's the story of a young couple vacationing at a French ski resort. While out for a spin, they get buried in an avalanche and manage to escape. Upon returning to the lodge, they discover everyone has disappeared in the entire town. No TV or phone signal. They assume people bolted because of another avalanche warning...or did they? It's definitely a quick read, characters analyze their own mortality and try to figure out where everyone went, how to deal with the isolation and how to get out of town. A couple dark twists are thrown in, along with some explicit love scenes (which I thought really didn't add to the plot at all) and it finishes up with an ending I sort of saw coming. That said, it's a good story overall and if you just want something you can finish in a day or two this could be it.

rfisher
04-20-2011, 04:01 AM
Especially if you combine her books with those of P.L. Gaus.

Some enterprising souls around Millersburg have seized on this trend and now offer murder mystery weekends. :lol:

Millersburg is one of the towns she mentions in the books. Is it the county seat? Apparently, that's where the hospital and corornor's office for Painter's Mill is located.