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Jenny
04-12-2011, 03:54 PM
Can e-books be passed on?

One of the great things about books is sharing them with others.

rfisher
04-12-2011, 04:12 PM
Dear me, my trashy paperbacks won't get handed down through the generations? :drama:

You mean you don't keep them and show them to your children so they'll know how you are thinking about their future? Shame on you.
Consider how much more valuable they will become over time with all the electronic books. Unless, you expect us to believe the only trashy paperbooks are on your e-reader which you disguise as something else.

gkelly
04-12-2011, 04:36 PM
None of those things would be useful for me; I don't mark in or alter books and never have, and haven't the slightest interest in autographs, so e-books suit me just fine.

Glad they meet your needs. Other readers have other needs.

Prancer
04-12-2011, 10:19 PM
Can e-books be passed on?

One of the great things about books is sharing them with others.

Depends on the e-book. Very complicated subject. In another five years it probably won't be, but for now--there is no simple answer.


You mean you don't keep them and show them to your children so they'll know how you are thinking about their future? Shame on you.
Consider how much more valuable they will become over time with all the electronic books. Unless, you expect us to believe the only trashy paperbooks are on your e-reader which you disguise as something else.

I am getting rid of nearly all my print books, actually. I don't see much reason to keep them. I don't see print becoming valuable during my lifetime, or my children's, either; there is far too much of it around and will be for generations to come.


Glad they meet your needs. Other readers have other needs.

Yes, I am aware of that. I consider myself very fortunate.

rfisher
04-12-2011, 11:48 PM
I am getting rid of nearly all my print books, actually. I don't see much reason to keep them. I don't see print becoming valuable during my lifetime, or my children's, either; there is far too much of it around and will be for generations to come.
.

Just you wait. Your poor starving grandchildren will be lamenting the fact that GrannyPrancer gave away all those valuable collectibles that could have paid for a loaf of bread. They'll be cursing you and crying WHY?

I haven't bought a Pat Cornwall book in quite a while. I loved her early stuff, but she got full of herself and consequently made Scarpetta completely unlikeable and the droning on and on about her feelings sucks the life out of the dead body. They wouldn't have to be murdered any more. They can just listen to Kay whine or describe Marino as an idiot. In my harrowing trip to the library, I grabbed Port Mortuary and thought I'd try one more time. :wall: The freaking book is on the 3rd disc and we don't even know who's dead nor do I particularly care at this point. If it was print, it would have already gone into the forget pile. For some reason, I feel compelled to keep listening to an audio book. Maybe because of the satisfaction I derive from yelling at the speakers.

pat c
04-13-2011, 12:00 AM
I swore I'd never read another Scarpetta book again, and then I had the Scarpetta Factor given to me. I finished it, but it wasn't a read that I enjoyed. No more.

I just finished Water for Elephants. Now going to re-read True Grit.

barbk
04-13-2011, 12:03 AM
I swore I'd never read another Scarpetta book again, and then I had the Scarpetta Factor given to me. I finished it, but it wasn't a read that I enjoyed. No more.
.

They'll be good again when Patricia Cornwell finally gets some effective treatment for depression. Until then :scream:

Prancer
04-13-2011, 12:11 AM
Just you wait. Your poor starving grandchildren will be lamenting the fact that GrannyPrancer gave away all those valuable collectibles that could have paid for a loaf of bread. They'll be cursing you and crying WHY?

If print is valuable by the time I have grandchildren, I will eat my Intro to Lit Crit textbook. Oh, wait, I can't--it was the first thing to go. If I could bring myself to burn a book, that would be the one. I wish it well in its quest to find a new home. It will need all the luck it can get.


I haven't bought a Pat Cornwall book in quite a while. I loved her early stuff, but she got full of herself and consequently made Scarpetta completely unlikeable and the droning on and on about her feelings sucks the life out of the dead body. They wouldn't have to be murdered any more. They can just listen to Kay whine or describe Marino as an idiot.

:lol: I never liked Cornwell and thought she was a hack writer from the very beginning, but someone gave me a copy of Port Mortuary, and :yikes:. She has really gone 'round the bend.

Allen
04-13-2011, 12:12 AM
They'll be good again when Patricia Cornwell finally gets some effective treatment for depression. Until then :scream:

I gave up on Cornwell a long time ago, but my grandmother still reads all of her books and then calls to tell me about them. Her vey first one, Post Mortem is still my favorite.

I just finished rereading Mark Danielewski's Only Revolutions. I'm on the thesis committee of a student whose project is about Danilewski, Shelley Jackson, and Jonathan Safron Foer. The first time I read Only Revolutions in grad school, I read it really quick because I was in a rush and I found it rather confusing. Now, I'm totally in love with it.

As much as I love Danielewski, I need to read something really fluffy and non-academic now. Any suggestions? I'm in the mood for something along the lines of Janet Evanovich or something like that.

rfisher
04-13-2011, 01:04 AM
JE's latest will be out in June. I snicker to see it's not on B&N's best seller to be released yet. She needs to stop letting her daughter do the writing. It's bad enough to recycle material, but daughter is really not very good at all.

jeffisjeff
04-13-2011, 01:37 AM
I swore I'd never read another Scarpetta book again, and then I had the Scarpetta Factor given to me. I finished it, but it wasn't a read that I enjoyed. No more.

Scarpetta Factor (and many of the other recent ones) was :scream: , but the most recent, Port Mortuary, is actually much improved.


:lol: I never liked Cornwell and thought she was a hack writer from the very beginning, but someone gave me a copy of Port Mortuary, and :yikes:. She has really gone 'round the bend.

Ooops, I should read to the end of the thread before commenting. ;)

Prancer
04-13-2011, 01:42 AM
Ooops, I should read to the end of the thread before commenting. ;)

:lol: You could very well be right for all I know. I read her first book and maybe half of her second and haven't read anything in between.

modern_muslimah
04-13-2011, 01:58 AM
Can e-books be passed on?

One of the great things about books is sharing them with others.

I passed on some very dear children's books to a niece who went on to destroy and/or lose them. I know it's sound anal but I was seriously pissed that she did not keep them in the good condition I had kept them in. :mad:

Sharing books is an overrated experience (for me anyway). The only person who shares books with me is my husband. Even with him, I have to make some limits like not eating Dorritos while reading a book that I brought. It is beyond irritating to see orange marks in my books.

I like my books to stay in pristine condition. He doesn't quite get it but is respectful. Other people I know really don't get it. "But M_M, I like when my books get worn because then people know that I read them." I really do not get that line of thinking at all. I don't care if people know whether or not I read a book. I just want them to remain nice and in as close to state they were in when I brought them from the bookstore as possible.

I'm just glad I have a Nook now. I'll never have to worry about book covers getting wrinkles and creases or pages accidentally getting dogeared. My books will remain perfect forever. :drama:

RockTheTassel
04-13-2011, 02:05 AM
It is beyond irritating to see orange marks in my books.

Orange food marks? Ew! :yikes: I'd never lend another book to someone who did that, spouse or not.

I have certain books I lend to people I trust, mostly old stuff or ones that I know are replaceable if something were to happen to them. Everything else stays on its place on the shelf and anyone who touches without permission incurs my wrath.

Prancer
04-13-2011, 02:09 AM
I like my books to stay in pristine condition. He doesn't quite get it but is respectful. Other people I know really don't get it. "But M_M, I like when my books get worn because then people know that I read them." I really do not get that line of thinking at all. I don't care if people know whether or not I read a book. I just want them to remain nice and in as close to state they were in when I brought them from the bookstore as possible.

I'm just glad I have a Nook now. I'll never have to worry about book covers getting wrinkles and creases or pages accidentally getting dogeared. My books will remain perfect forever. :drama:

My soulmate!