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PrincessLeppard
04-12-2011, 04:04 AM
And I am sure you will regale us with some of the more notable excerpts? :P

All of my students will write perfect, well thought-out, interesting papers. :saint:

IceAlisa
04-12-2011, 04:10 AM
All of my students will write perfect, well thought-out, interesting papers. :saint:

:lol: Can't wait for their wisdom and insight.

Prancer
04-12-2011, 04:11 AM
All of my students will write perfect, well thought-out, interesting papers. :saint:

Of course they will, dear.

John 3 17
04-12-2011, 04:12 AM
I buy multiple copies of books I reread frequently. I have two copies of all the HP books. One copy to read and one in pristine condition. :shuffle:

I have four sets of Chronicles of Narnia: my first set, given to me when I was eight (and Prince Caspian still smells a bit of the milk I spilled on it when I was nine), one set I got when I was 12 b/c my mom felt sentimental about my first set and then we wouldn't mind loaning them to my granny (I used color pencils to color in the black and white illusttrations on this set), a set I got when I was about 20 because HarperCollins printed them with pretty covers and included extra Pauline Baynes' illustrations, and finally, the gorgeous full-color 50th Anniversary set with all of Baynes' illustrations and the original covers (this one I keep pristine). I'd still love the other set HC did and if I ever get a chance to own any of vintage editions, I'd be thrilled!

I own two versions of Silmarillion: I found a first printing at my thrift store and I bought a regular softcover for reading (though, that reminds me, I need to buy another version as the one I have smells awful even though I bought it brand new).

I own two versions of all of Austen's novels because at first, I just grabbed them as I found them in either book stores or my thrift store; but later I wanted the B&N versions because the paper and font are so nice, plus I love the historical footnotes included.

-Bridget :)

RockTheTassel
04-12-2011, 04:20 AM
I have pristine, special editions of the Harry Potter books lined up on my shelf. In my closet are the falling apart versions I got when I was eight.

I'm glad I'm not the only one who had multiple sets of books. People think I'm weird for having multiple copies and then try to convince me of how great e-readers are. It's not the same. I need my books. :P

IceAlisa
04-12-2011, 04:26 AM
I have multiple editions of Pride and Prejudice but for different reasons. One is the regular paperback I got a long time ago and read. Another is an annotated edition--highly recommend to the fellow Austen buffs. And the third is this cute mini edition I saw on sale at B&N and just couldn't leave in the store. :shuffle:

Matryeshka
04-12-2011, 05:12 AM
Yea, I"m happy you're reading the books. I enjoyed them all. I love the hardness of Gin.

Have you tried the audiobooks for the series.

I need to thank Desperado for starting that thread about books with witches that spawned a whole urban fantasy booklist. I have several that I need to put on my Kindle for my trip to New York.

No audiobooks for me. I don't know why, but I've never liked audiobooks. Besides, you can't dogear an audiobook.

Prancer
04-12-2011, 05:17 AM
I need to thank Desperado for starting that thread about books with witches that spawned a whole urban fantasy booklist. I have several that I need to put on my Kindle for my trip to New York.

No audiobooks for me. I don't know why, but I've never liked audiobooks. Besides, you can't dogear an audiobook.

Or a Kindle :D.

VIETgrlTerifa
04-12-2011, 06:11 AM
I can't stand audio books either. The reader just never reads at the same pace as I do. However, I was very tempted to by the audio book of Carrie with Sissy Spacek doing the reading.

Spinner
04-12-2011, 06:22 AM
Forgot to mention...along with the previous errors noted, the author pic on the inside of the back cover is of someone else. No, I'm not kidding. David Drake is a fantasy author, but he had nothing to do with these books. :lol:

gkelly
04-12-2011, 12:50 PM
i have two copies of King Lear used for productions that I assistant stage managed and directed, with all the text cuts marked and a few other notes. They're paperbacks with spines, real books, but they were also working scripts that served a purpose by being marked up. (I also have at least three anthologies of various sorts that include that play.)

Many of my acting copies of scripts from Samuel French or Dramatists Play Service are similarly marked with analysis or blocking notes from productions or scene study classes. I'll spare Prancer the description of cutting up books to paste the pages in/on looseleaf paper to put in binders to make promptbooks, although I more often used photocopies when I was stage managing.

And then I also made notes in many of the books I used for grad school, points I wanted to highlight for quoting in my dissertation, etc. I've since removed the flags that I mentioned in my last post, but the notes are still there for posterity.

Not to mention books autographed by the author.

All useful functions of altering printed books that get lost with e-reader format.

rfisher
04-12-2011, 02:41 PM
Plus, ereaders can't become rare first editions that your family will inherit. One must plan for their future. I reminded my brother of this when he complained that I was spending his inheritance on books and to stop.

PDilemma
04-12-2011, 03:43 PM
All useful functions of altering printed books that get lost with e-reader format.

Having directed several high school productions, I'm not really sure how scripts on e-readers would work.

skatingfan5
04-12-2011, 03:45 PM
I have multiple editions of Pride and Prejudice but for different reasons. One is the regular paperback I got a long time ago and read. Another is an annotated edition--highly recommend to the fellow Austen buffs. And the third is this cute mini edition I saw on sale at B&N and just couldn't leave in the store. :shuffle:I, too, have multiple copies of Pride and Prejudice. I still mourn the loss of the paperback edition that was my first introduction to Jane Austen at age 12 or 13. :wuzrobbed Somewhere between moves it seems to have vanished and even though the front cover and several sections of pages had become detached over multiple readings, there was not a single dog-eared page, thus saving the lives of innumerable penguins, puppies and kittens. :saint: Inexplicably, Lizzie was depicted as a red-head on the cover design :eek: :lol:, but I still miss that copy which I must have read at least 15 times. I have several hard cover editions which were printed in the early 1900's, one of them a gift from my niece, who also is an Austen fan. We both have the wonderful annotated edition. :)

ETA: I am looking forward to a choice sampling of excerpts from PL's students' "perfect, well thought-out, interesting papers". :D

Prancer
04-12-2011, 03:49 PM
All useful functions of altering printed books that get lost with e-reader format.

Oh, are we back to talking about why e-books are such poor bastard cousins to the real thing again?

None of those things would be useful for me; I don't mark in or alter books and never have, and haven't the slightest interest in autographs, so e-books suit me just fine. If posteriors want to see my notes on books, they will have to look at my notebooks, which are cleverly named to help said posteriors grasp their purpose.


Plus, ereaders can't become rare first editions that your family will inherit.

Dear me, my trashy paperbacks won't get handed down through the generations? :drama: