PDA

View Full Version : Everything By the Book



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 [40] 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

Artemis@BC
03-23-2011, 11:11 PM
PotE has millions of devoted fans everywhere; everyone seems to love this book. Everyone but me that is. I stopped reading halfway through; I found it to be very Johnny-One-Note - no highs or lows, everything on the same level. I reached yet another rape-and-pillage-a-village scene and I gave up; we knew already who the villain was and this scene did nothing to add to his character development in any way. It was just gratuitous. I say don't bother.

This. Not to mention the "I've done a crapload of research and by golly I'm going to use every single bit of it" approach. Oh, and if that is isn't warning enough or it's too late to not read it ... by all means stay far far away from World without End (or Book without End as I called it). I picked it up after having expunged the PotE experience from my brain ... and it's exactly the same as PotE, only a couple of hundred years later. Same characters with different names, same plot structure ... ugh!


My absolute favorite mysteries are Dorothy L. Sayers's. Gaudy Night isn't just my favorite mystery, it's one of my favorite books of all time.

Ah, a much happier topic! Sayers was my first love in the mystery genre (not Agatha Christie, as is for so many), and still one of the best IMO. And there's so much variety within the genre too! There are the "cozies" like Hazel Holt, the pure escapist adventure ones like Dick Francis, the amateur sleuth ones like Gail Bowen, the gritty police procedurals like Ian Rankin, the continuing character development series like Elizabeth George, the "mystery romances" like Ann Granger and Deborah Crombie, and the dark psychological ones like Val McDermid. *sigh* Give me a good mystery and I'm a happy girl.

barbk
03-23-2011, 11:39 PM
Have you read her other books in the series? If not, I'd suggest starting with the earlier ones so you can follow the relationship between Coop, Chapman and Mercer.

Yes, I've read them all. She talked for a bit about "Final Jeopardy" -- turns out when she was in law school she was part of a study group. Every night they took a break and watched just the final jeopardy question, and the loser had to buy the beer for after study group. She said she figures out which of the characters needs a "win" at the moment, and picks the trivia accordingly. None are real questions from the show, but she said she gets more questions/comments on the Jeopardy questions than anything else -- people routinely send her suggestions of trivia. One even complained that one of the answers she did use would never have fit on a real Jeopardy card given the type size they use. :eek:

She also mentioned that she tries to make Chapman and Mercer smart, because so many mysteries featuring prosecutors treat the police as stupid. I thought that was interesting.

rfisher
03-23-2011, 11:44 PM
Yes, I've read them all. She talked for a bit about "Final Jeopardy" -- turns out when she was in law school she was part of a study group. Every night they took a break and watched just the final jeopardy question, and the loser had to buy the beer for after study group. She said she figures out which of the characters needs a "win" at the moment, and picks the trivia accordingly. None are real questions from the show, but she said she gets more questions/comments on the Jeopardy questions than anything else -- people routinely send her suggestions of trivia. One even complained that one of the answers she did use would never have fit on a real Jeopardy card given the type size they use. :eek:

She also mentioned that she tries to make Chapman and Mercer smart, because so many mysteries featuring prosecutors treat the police as stupid. I thought that was interesting.

Did she give any hints if Chapman and Coop will eventually acknowledge their feelings for each other? :lol:

IceAlisa
03-23-2011, 11:48 PM
Possession FINALLY arrived today from my ebay seller, who had a myriad of reasons of just why s/he *said* they mailed it, but then didn't. I usually don't go in for the whole Victorian stuff unless there's a pirate and some serious debauching going on, but the reviews here and on Goodreads (even the reviewers that didn't like it. Maybe especially the reviewers that didn't like it :lol:) were so intriguing, I have to give it a go.

So far, so good. I adore books that start out unabashadly pretentious with the author beating you about the head that yes, he is, in fact, smarter than you and more literate than you. I figure I'll know whether it's the kind of intellectual masturbation that ultimately turns me on or off within the next 100 pages or so. :P
Matry, Possession actually picks up in about what, 150, 200 pages? Definitely worth the slog overall. There is some brilliant writing in there.

barbk
03-24-2011, 04:42 PM
Did she give any hints if Chapman and Coop will eventually acknowledge their feelings for each other? :lol:

No -- but that would have been a really good question; I'm sorry I didn't think of it. I keep waiting for them to fall into bed together.

Wyliefan
03-24-2011, 04:48 PM
Matry, Possession actually picks up in about what, 150, 200 pages? Definitely worth the slog overall. There is some brilliant writing in there.

Yes, if you can make it through the letters, things pick up from there! :)

PrincessLeppard
03-24-2011, 10:55 PM
I finished idlewld last night. Author is related to Carl Sagan, but his first name is escaping me. Anyway, awesome premise, nice twist about 2/3 of the way through...and then he rushes the ending, kills off some key characters ( quickly and out of the blue ) and then just ruins the whole thing with his cop out ending. Dammit.

rfisher
03-24-2011, 11:22 PM
Picked up the latest installment of the No 1 Ladies Detective Agency series: The Saturday Big Tent Wedding Party. I love these books and I absolutely love them on audio. The narrator has this fantastic Botswana lilting voice. I have both hard copies and audio of the series. Mma Ramotswe is a wonderful character.

skateycat
03-27-2011, 08:45 AM
I just got my copy of Big Sex Little Death: A Memoir by Susie Bright. I worked a lot with her dad, who passed away in 2006.

skateycat
03-27-2011, 05:34 PM
So!

This morning I had a dream that I was talking to Susie's dad Bill, in the Karuk language more often than not. It was very sweet.

Also, I found out that Susie is running for Grand Marshall in the San Francisco Pride Parade. You can vote here. (http://sfpride.org/) You also get to vote for an organizational grand marshall and you get to throw a pink brick - think Razzies.

Spinner
03-27-2011, 06:41 PM
So!

This morning I had a dream that I was talking to Susie's dad Bill, in the Karuk language more often than not. It was very sweet.

Also, I found out that Susie is running for Grand Marshall in the San Francisco Pride Parade. You can vote here. (http://sfpride.org/) You also get to vote for an organizational grand marshall and you get to throw a pink brick - think Razzies.
Um, whaaaat?

skateycat
03-27-2011, 08:09 PM
Um, whaaaat?

Sorry! The Susie in question is Susie Bright, the author of the memoir I mentioned in the previous post. I'm looking forward to reading her memoir in part because I will get to learn new things about her dad, who was a mentor to me.

PrincessLeppard
03-27-2011, 11:39 PM
The used bookstore near me is going out of business, so I picked up a couple of books. I'm reading "The School Board Murders." I find it therapeutic. :EVILLE:

Though there is a lot of "I HAVE A HUGE GIANT SECRET" and the secret isn't so...giant.

IceAlisa
03-28-2011, 03:50 AM
I finally started in on my birthday presents from amazon and am now reading The Mother's Recompense by Edith Wharton.

So far it's disappointing and my disappointment has to do more with the style rather than the narrative itself. It's a bit melodramatic and precious for my taste. I didn't find this to be the case either with The House of Mirth which I absolutely loved or The Age of Innocence so I am wondering what happened to Wharton's later writing.

I am not sure how to describe it but the writing feels insincere and contrived. I hope it picks up.

The part I am enjoying are the mentions of places on the French Riviera and Italy that I know well and even a mention of a hotel I've stayed at near the end of the book (yes, I peeked as I always do).

immoimeme
03-28-2011, 08:28 PM
I read Jim Thompson about 20 years ago. Good stuff. The movie "The Grifters" is also based on one of his novels.
You can safely skip this movie. It was seriously ZZZZZZZZZZZ