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oleada
03-19-2011, 07:08 PM
I'm a weirdo: I liked all three books in the Hunger Games trilogy. I loved the first the most and the others in decreasing amounts, but I loved the whole series as a whole.

I've never seen Pettyfer(sp?) act, but just from the celebrity gossip out there, I'm not thrilled with the idea of him as Peeta. But maybe he can act.

No, you're not a weirdo. I loved all three books, too.

I'm not thrilled about Pettyfer either. The Mockingjay board seem behind the idea of Hunter Parrish. I've never seen Parrish in anything, but he's hot and seems more charismatic.

Mozart
03-19-2011, 07:19 PM
I finally finishe The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo a few days ago and am part way through The Girl who played with fire. Yes, I am behind the times but now that I have been reading toomany academic books and articles LOL. I love my new ereader:)

Matryeshka
03-20-2011, 08:46 PM
I put this in another thread on FSU, but in case there are others out there who read The Black Jewels, know this: Anne Bishop is dead to me. Dead. Dead, dead, dead, dead, dead. I would highly recommend not reading Twilight's Dawn. I am contemplating writing very, very, very bad fanfic to make up for Bishop's mistake. I'm sure that will teach her. :P

Spoilers abound:
First off, let me say, I like the idea that Jaenelle DID die, and life for Dameon and co. did go on, except for Sataen, who I think would quite literally die of a broken heart. I like that Sylvia was killed to demon-dead so Sataen and she could finally get together in some capacity. I have no problems with Dameon remarrying and going on with his life, and I LOVE that Lucivar had a daughter and named her Titian. That storyline was perfect. Winsol Gifts, the first story, was perfect. LOVED that story, and I forsee re-reading that one often.

What I did not like: the complete destruction of Surreal. For one, I hated the spooky house story, and I hated the references to it, and I hate how she went nuts because she's stronger than that. I also think she deserved a lot, a lot, a lot better than being Dameon's second choice. She deserves to be first in someone's life, not settle for someone who "loves her but is not in love with her." Especially after Falon, Surreal deserves someone that would be completely, absolutely, totally NUTS, do anything for her.

Second thing I did not like: Dameon deserved better too. I wish she would have written a clean break--a new character, someone not like Jaenelle or Lucivar or anyone--someone that would tell Dameon to get over himself. I know it's a radical interpretation, but to me there is a slight feeling of incest with a lot of her main characters--the SaDiabolo family needs some new blood. Though I'm OK with him being the High Lord--that I think was expected. He needed a different kind of love--not something as desperate, angry, epic etc.--something more mature that could withstand him being one of the longer races. He needed maturity, not someone that carried some of the same baggage.

Third thing I did not like: The Ghost of Jaenelle. That's just creepy. When Jaenelle died, that should have been it. The year of mourning, I liked that. I thought it was within her character and a nice send-off. I did not like her reappearing--it was just off. Let Dameon make a clean break. LOVE that they had a daughter. Hated the name. Hated her getting Jaenelle's jewel. I love the idea of the Realms continuing without Jaenelle...but it needed to continue without Jaenelle.


In other disappointing news: David Sedaris' Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary was also not very good. Very cutesy cliched, forumualic, blah. I'm also reading A Moveable Feast: Life-Changing Food Adventures From Around The World, which is a series of essays about food. Some are better than others, but it's a nice coffee-table type book to read. Bourdain's essays alone are worth it. The man's a complete ass, but he can write.

PrincessLeppard
03-20-2011, 09:13 PM
I'm reading The Boy Who Dared by Susan Campbell Bartoletti. It's about a boy growing up as Hitler is rising to power and questions what's happening.

It's supposed to be based on a true story. It's also supposed to be young adult, but the writing so far is young tween. The story is good so far, though.

Evilynn
03-21-2011, 02:03 PM
I am trying, really really trying, to read the Wheel of Time books because it is a well known fantasy series and I want to see what all the fuss is about. I just can't really get into it. It's just a bit too cheesy.

On the other hand, am I the only dork around who is super-excited for HBO's upcoming Game of Thrones? Read the books recently and really didn't mind them too much. High fantasy, yes, but not too much cheese.

A Song of Fire and Ice is a lot grittier than Wheel of Time, and I'm really looking forward to the Game of Throne TV series too, although I think GRRM has a snowball's chance in hell of finishing the books before the TV series catches up with him if they stick with one book per season pace. :lol:


Give up. If you didn't fall in love with Matt and Moiraine in The Eye of the World, and at least enjoy the fact that Jordan describes the garments and appearance of every single being ever mentioned in the books, then the later books wouldn't just be cheesy to you, they'd be unendurable.

:rofl: I think I started reading them at the right age (ca 13). I'm going to reread them all later this year once the last book is closer to completion.

zaphyre14
03-21-2011, 02:14 PM
I'm back on my Roman kick with Steven Saylor's "The Venus Throw." I think I'd really like this series if there was just a little less philosophizing and speechifying and a little more action.

In the car, I've finished "Morality for Beautiful Girls" and am about to jump back in time to an early Kellerman "The Web." I only hope that I get a new car (with a CD player) before the library discards all of its audio cassettes - or all that's left to me is Stephen King (whom I despise!).

Wyliefan
03-21-2011, 02:22 PM
I'm reading The Boy Who Dared by Susan Campbell Bartoletti. It's about a boy growing up as Hitler is rising to power and questions what's happening.

It's supposed to be based on a true story. It's also supposed to be young adult, but the writing so far is young tween. The story is good so far, though.

I misread that as "a boy growing up as Hitler," period. :eek: Now that would be some book!

PrincessLeppard
03-21-2011, 02:35 PM
I misread that as "a boy growing up as Hitler," period. :eek: Now that would be some book!

:yikes:

Disclaimer for those who want to read it: it's written in present tense, and combined with the "young" writing, it starts to grate about halfway through.

zaphyre14
03-21-2011, 05:58 PM
it's written in present tense,

That would end it for me right on the first page. I hate present tense writing.

modern_muslimah
03-21-2011, 08:05 PM
I finally finishe The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo a few days ago and am part way through The Girl who played with fire. Yes, I am behind the times but now that I have been reading toomany academic books and articles LOL. I love my new ereader:)

How are you liking The Girl Who Played with Fire? I finished TGWTDT a few months ago and borrowed TGHPWF from the library but it has remained untouched, despite me renewing it once and probably having to renew it again soon. :shuffle: I got caught up in Sons and Lovers. I'm about a quarter way done. I'm actually surprised I like the novel so much.

TygerLily
03-21-2011, 10:26 PM
No, you're not a weirdo. I loved all three books, too. Yay! In general, I rarely hear that I'm not a weirdo. :lol:

Incidentally, I've been lurking in here for ages and getting some great book ideas, so thank you everyone!

Matryeshka
03-21-2011, 11:42 PM
Possession FINALLY arrived today from my ebay seller, who had a myriad of reasons of just why s/he *said* they mailed it, but then didn't. I usually don't go in for the whole Victorian stuff unless there's a pirate and some serious debauching going on, but the reviews here and on Goodreads (even the reviewers that didn't like it. Maybe especially the reviewers that didn't like it :lol:) were so intriguing, I have to give it a go.

So far, so good. I adore books that start out unabashadly pretentious with the author beating you about the head that yes, he is, in fact, smarter than you and more literate than you. I figure I'll know whether it's the kind of intellectual masturbation that ultimately turns me on or off within the next 100 pages or so.

TygerLily--let me put your mind at ease. If the third book did not piss you off, you are definitely a weirdo. :P

barbk
03-23-2011, 03:02 AM
Went to hear Linda Fairstein tonight at our local bookstore -- she writes the mystery novels featuring NY Assistant District Attorney Alexandra Cooper and the Special Victims (Sex Crimes) unit. Not a big turnout -- spring break for both local schools and the U this week, and CU playing in the NIT and bad weather tonight on top -- but she was a very good speaker. Lots of fun to hear her talk about the differences between herself and her protagonist -- she was head of the Special Victims Unit, but as she said, Cooper is younger, thinner and blonder -- and has a lot more dough due to the trust fund she set her up with so she didn't really have to live the life of an ADA. Fairstein's novels each manage to explore some aspect of New York City's architectural or archeological history in some fair detail, and she talked about the four year process of visiting Manhattan places of worship gathering bits and pieces, and learning that there was an Old St. Patrick's Cathedral, and that the Mt. Nebo Baptist Church in Harlem started out as a Jewish synagogue, and the stained glass and many of the carvings still reflect that. It has been a while since I was last at an author talk, and this was fun. I'm going to make a point of getting to some more. I bought the new book, and am looking forward to reading it soon.

Artemis@BC
03-23-2011, 10:51 PM
Yes, it (Room) is a quick book to read. I agree about Jack's voice. After a bit, I sort of read it as if his story had been translated from a child's thoughts and experience to an adult voice.

That's how I viewed it too -- and it didn't bother me in the least. It wasn't quite a single sitting read for me, as I started it at 11:00 at night ... but I did have to keep reading the first night until they got out.

But speaking of unrealistic voices ... I just finished The Book of Negroes by Lawrence Hill (which I believe was published in the US under the title Someone Knows My Name). It started off really well, but unfortunately that didn't hold up.

It's an epic tale of Aminata, captured at age 11, sold into slavery, years on an indigo plantation in Carolina, to New York during the Revolutionary War, to the Loyalist colonies in Nova Scotia, to Sierra Leone, and finally to London. But therein lies the problem -- in trying to depict so many aspects of a slave's experience, the author makes the protagonist unbelievable and the plot structure tedious. Plus I thought that Aminata's character was just too good to be true -- the Ayla syndrome IYKWIM.

However. It is still a story that deserved to be told, and it definitely had some good points. So I'm glad I read it.

rfisher
03-23-2011, 10:58 PM
Went to hear Linda Fairstein tonight at our local bookstore -- she writes the mystery novels featuring NY Assistant District Attorney Alexandra Cooper and the Special Victims (Sex Crimes) unit. Not a big turnout -- spring break for both local schools and the U this week, and CU playing in the NIT and bad weather tonight on top -- but she was a very good speaker. Lots of fun to hear her talk about the differences between herself and her protagonist -- she was head of the Special Victims Unit, but as she said, Cooper is younger, thinner and blonder -- and has a lot more dough due to the trust fund she set her up with so she didn't really have to live the life of an ADA. Fairstein's novels each manage to explore some aspect of New York City's architectural or archeological history in some fair detail, and she talked about the four year process of visiting Manhattan places of worship gathering bits and pieces, and learning that there was an Old St. Patrick's Cathedral, and that the Mt. Nebo Baptist Church in Harlem started out as a Jewish synagogue, and the stained glass and many of the carvings still reflect that. It has been a while since I was last at an author talk, and this was fun. I'm going to make a point of getting to some more. I bought the new book, and am looking forward to reading it soon.

Have you read her other books in the series? If not, I'd suggest starting with the earlier ones so you can follow the relationship between Coop, Chapman and Mercer.