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rfisher
03-12-2011, 06:27 PM
Oh, there are plenty of Regency romances these days that feature moist clefts and laving tongues and thrusting manhood and all that. I'm just not not in the mood, ha ha.

I'm stockpiling mysteries, too, if anyone has any suggestions there.

Do your read Linda Fairstein's books? They're set in NY. The lead character is a lawyer in the sex crimes division. Fairstein was one of the original sex crimes prosecutors more than 20 years ago. They are also usually featured around some historical NY landmark. The latest uses several famous churches. She had one that featured the library that was really interesting. And one on the subway that had a lot of background info on the people who dig and now maintain the tunnels. You don't have to read them in order, but it helps to understand the relationships between the 3 lead characters.

Grannyfan
03-12-2011, 07:53 PM
I'm stockpiling mysteries, too, if anyone has any suggestions there.

I recommend Louis Bayard. Mr. Timothy, The Pale Blue Eye, and The Black Tower are three I've read. Also, anything by Thomas Cook.

John 3 17
03-12-2011, 10:55 PM
[snip]Now that I've had a stressful week, what with Mini Ice's visit to the ER and all, I am going back to my comfort zone and re-reading one of my faves--Austen's Emma. Thank goodness for Austen. I am convinced her work is the source of countless hours of comfort and entertainment for millions. :respec:

ITA. I reread all of her novels last year when I was going through a very sad and difficult time and she really helped. Persuasion will forever be a treasure to me after that.

-Bridget

Wyliefan
03-12-2011, 11:13 PM
P&P is my favorite of Austen's. I'm so conventional. :)

IceAlisa
03-12-2011, 11:18 PM
Mine too. It's delightful. I just felt more like Emma and not Lizzy this week for some reason.

John 3 17
03-12-2011, 11:20 PM
P&P is my favorite of Austen's. I'm so conventional. :)

P&P had been my #1 fave since I was 16, but rereading Persuasion in my mourning made it my very fave with P&P a very close second.

-Bridget

Matryeshka
03-13-2011, 12:05 AM
I finished Patricia Brigg's latest. For going on a honeymoon with a hot, buff werewolf, it was remarkably unsexy. If that was the only problem with the book, it would be OK, as sexy/romance has never been the best aspect of her writing. I kind of expected once she and Adam got hitched, sexy werewolf time would pretty much be over. :lol:

However, there are NO vampires in this one. Not too much on Uncle Mike or Zeke or the fae in general. Nothing too much on Stefan and his menagerie--you get a little at the beginning since that was the focus of the last book, and you don't really deal with the fae. It's pretty much a stand alone, except you do get some (really lame) backstory on her dad. Somehow, the Native American legends were not as interesting as they should have been, and I didn't particularly care about any of the other characters.

I think this would have worked better as a novella, focusing solely on Mercy's father and her background. Everything else out was either superfluous or boring or both.

Now onto that future serial killer poisoner extraordinaire, Favia de Luce!

PrincessLeppard
03-13-2011, 12:40 AM
I'm reading Evolution, Me and Other Freaks of Nature, a young adult novel. Kind of interesting--minister from conservative church tries to get Intelligent Design taught in the schools, but former girl from that church has Deep Dark Sekret about the church. Which is fine. The problem is, the longer you delay the reveal, the "bigger" it has to be. And while it's sad, it should've been something that was brought up earlier in the book. IMHO, of course. ;)

Wyliefan
03-13-2011, 12:49 AM
Thanks for the rec, PL -- I'd like to check that out.

Prancer
03-13-2011, 06:28 AM
My absolute favorite mysteries, those, are Dorothy L. Sayers's. Gaudy Night isn't just my favorite mystery, it's one of my favorite books of all time.

For many years, I read nothing but mysteries, so I've hit most of the classics


Do your read Linda Fairstein's books?

I've read some of them. I like her stories okay, but I am not a fan of her writing style. She writes stiffly, for want of a better word, sort of like Mary Higgins Clark.


I recommend Louis Bayard. Mr. Timothy, The Pale Blue Eye, and The Black Tower are three I've read. Also, anything by Thomas Cook.

I've never tried Bayard; I will check him out. I think I have a Thomas Cook on my to-be-read shelf :).


I can't believe anyone else has heard of Joan Smith, her earliest ones are the best - Escapade, Aunt Sophie's Diamonds, Talk of the Town and Imprudent Lady. Very funny, although I would not say they bring home the regency period like GH

Smith has so many books in print and has written across so many genres that I can't believe anyone hasn't heard of her :P, but you're the first person I've come across who has. Totally agree about her early books being the best; I am smiling right now thinking of all everyone running around trying to dig up Aunt Sophie's body behind everyone else's backs and Daphne delivering a crushing setdown to the Duke of Felix. I read one of Smith's later ones a while back and was rather meh. Her mysteries aren't great, but they aren't too bad, either.

Do you like Todd's Bess Crawford series? I have one on the to-be-read shelf.

Erin
03-13-2011, 02:27 PM
Now that I've had a stressful week, what with Mini Ice's visit to the ER and all, I am going back to my comfort zone and re-reading one of my faves--Austen's Emma. Thank goodness for Austen. I am convinced her work is the source of countless hours of comfort and entertainment for millions. :respec:

:cheer: I just finished a re-read of Sense & Sensibility (finally got around to watching the 2007 BBC mini-series and needed to follow it up with a refresher of the book). Emma has never been my favourite of Austen's, but it might be due for a re-read soon too as it's been a while. P&P and Persuasion always get frequent readings, so I have to rotate in a different Austen every once in a while.

Has anyone ever read Pillars of the Earth? My mom lent it to me ages ago and I have been scared off by the length but I really need something new to read so I'm trying to decide whether to give it a shot or not.

IceAlisa
03-13-2011, 04:53 PM
Have any fellow Austenites read the annotated version of P&P? It's a lot of fun. :)

I just wish they'd do the same with the rest of her works.

emason
03-13-2011, 06:06 PM
Has anyone ever read Pillars of the Earth? My mom lent it to me ages ago and I have been scared off by the length but I really need something new to read so I'm trying to decide whether to give it a shot or not.

PotE has millions of devoted fans everywhere; everyone seems to love this book. Everyone but me that is. I stopped reading halfway through; I found it to be very Johnny-One-Note - no highs or lows, everything on the same level. I reached yet another rape-and-pillage-a-village scene and I gave up; we knew already who the villain was and this scene did nothing to add to his character development in any way. It was just gratuitous. I say don't bother.

PDilemma
03-13-2011, 09:18 PM
Have any fellow Austenites read the annotated version of P&P? It's a lot of fun. :)

I just wish they'd do the same with the rest of her works.

I have it. I used it a lot when I used to teach the book. There is a lot of interesting info in there.

rfisher
03-13-2011, 09:54 PM
PotE has millions of devoted fans everywhere; everyone seems to love this book. Everyone but me that is. I stopped reading halfway through; I found it to be very Johnny-One-Note - no highs or lows, everything on the same level. I reached yet another rape-and-pillage-a-village scene and I gave up; we knew already who the villain was and this scene did nothing to add to his character development in any way. It was just gratuitous. I stay don't bother.

ITA The book could have been half the length without all the repeat crap. After a point you were totally desensitized to the violence.