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rfisher
03-11-2011, 02:21 PM
I did; once I figured out how to access it, I found out that I had logged 119 books as read. I have no idea how or when I did that, and I was a bit :eek: at the ratings I gave some of the books.

I honestly don't remember doing this at all, and I certainly don't remember taking a book compatibility test. I also know that I read White Noise at some point, but that's all I can tell you about the book. I do remember Foucault's Pendulum (which I also read very slowly and distinctly remember as having this very tiny print as well as dense text), but that's probably because I read it a long time ago and so it's all preserved in long-term memory.

:shuffle:

I hate to think of how big the black hole in my brain is going to get this decade.

((((Prancer))) it's because your mind rejected all that heavy angsty drama. Stick with Reacher, some good smutty stuff, and even a quick revisit with Archie and Gretchen for some :yikes: and your brain will be just fine. :D

Wyliefan
03-11-2011, 04:13 PM
You guys! The new Thursday Next novel is out and I didn't know it! I'm a bad fan. :wuzrobbed I just happened across it in B&N, and snatched it the instant I saw it.

Prancer
03-11-2011, 06:34 PM
((((Prancer))) it's because your mind rejected all that heavy angsty drama. Stick with Reacher, some good smutty stuff, and even a quick revisit with Archie and Gretchen for some :yikes: and your brain will be just fine. :D

I'm very stressed at the moment, and when I am stressed, I read the most mindless stuff I can find. I'm chugging through Regency romances at the moment; it's so soothing to know from beginning that Lord Rakehell will fall hard for Miss Bluestocking and that there will likely be some witty bon mots and much rustling silk along the way.

triple_toe
03-12-2011, 12:27 AM
You guys! The new Thursday Next novel is out and I didn't know it! I'm a bad fan. :wuzrobbed I just happened across it in B&N, and snatched it the instant I saw it.

WHAT?! It's come out already?! Runs off to the nearest bookstore :rollin:

emason
03-12-2011, 12:56 AM
I'm very stressed at the moment, and when I am stressed, I read the most mindless stuff I can find. I'm chugging through Regency romances at the moment; it's so soothing to know from beginning that Lord Rakehell will fall hard for Miss Bluestocking and that there will likely be some witty bon mots and much rustling silk along the way.

Any one or two in particular to recommend? I've never read a Regency romance and I'm thinking of trying one. Thanks.

Prancer
03-12-2011, 01:24 AM
Any one or two in particular to recommend? I've never read a Regency romance and I'm thinking of trying one. Thanks.

Georgette Heyer (http://www.georgette-heyer.com/) is the gold standard of Regency romance, I believe. I also like Joan Smith (http://www.thenonesuch.com/sbooks.htm#Joan Smith), whose books are usually quite light and amusing, although I must say, I haven't even heard of half the ones on that list :P. The ones I have read, though, usually feature some sprightly dialogue.

Matryeshka
03-12-2011, 02:39 AM
Georgette Heyer is a little cutesy for my taste. Not enough bodice ripping, and I find her heroines sometimes to be a bit silly. Though I can see why others love her--her dialogue is a lot better than in most romances in that there is actual dialogue and goes beyond no, I shan't, but I can't help myself! Ravish and disgrace me, you scoundrel, you! :drama:

My favorite for historical romance is Loretta Chase. She's somewhere between Heyer and Johanna Lindsey. The dialogue is snappier, the heroines are older and closer in age to the heros, and they tend to be more experienced.

John 3 17
03-12-2011, 11:01 AM
I'm now reading The Chronicles of Narnia.I'm about half way through it,started it last week.Finished The Brothers Karamazov a few weeks go and gave myself a weeks break.

:cheer2::cheer2::cheer2:

I've read those books I don't know how many times. Started when I was eight. They've gotten me through many, many bad times. "Love" doesn't begin to express my feelings for Narnia.

-Bridget

John 3 17
03-12-2011, 11:07 AM
Georgette Heyer is a little cutesy for my taste. Not enough bodice ripping, and I find her heroines sometimes to be a bit silly. Though I can see why others love her--her dialogue is a lot better than in most romances in that there is actual dialogue and goes beyond no, I shan't, but I can't help myself! Ravish and disgrace me, you scoundrel, you! :drama:

My favorite for historical romance is Loretta Chase. She's somewhere between Heyer and Johanna Lindsey. The dialogue is snappier, the heroines are older and closer in age to the heros, and they tend to be more experienced.

I like her for the very reason that there is no bodice-ripping. Sorry, I don't do smut (I'm a prude, lol!) :drama:

Many of Heyer's heroines are older -- one of the many reasons I love her. Off the top of my head Lady of Quality, Black Sheep, and The Nonesuch where they are about 29 (which in those days was considered quite an "old maid"), or did you mean older than that?

Due to all the snow my area got this winter, it made me read my TBR pile (I don't drive much in snow...) and I finally got to read a novel in the Redwall series: Rakkety Tam. When these books first appeared on my radar in the '90s I heard they were very violent. And yes, they are in parts, but overall I liked it. Other than being a little over-long and a little bogged down sometimes (which I admit to skipping) I liked the moral of the tale, the virtue, the bravery and heroics and self-sacrifice, the characters, the adventure, and I loved Jacque's well-written Scottish dialect! The Scottish accent is one of my very favorites -- so musical and free -- and he captured it very well. I was sad to learn that the author died just last month :(

-Bridget

Prancer
03-12-2011, 12:46 PM
Georgette Heyer is a little cutesy for my taste. Not enough bodice ripping, and I find her heroines sometimes to be a bit silly. Though I can see why others love her--her dialogue is a lot better than in most romances in that there is actual dialogue and goes beyond no, I shan't, but I can't help myself! Ravish and disgrace me, you scoundrel, you! :drama:

And then "Oh, no! Lady Fairlane cut me dead at the milliner's shop this morning and Lord Hempton-Smythe-Fescue crossed the street to avoid me! Now I will never get those vouchers to Almacks from Lady Jersey. I am ruined!" :drama:

I'm up for silly and sweet at the moment; I need some cotton candy.


My favorite for historical romance is Loretta Chase. She's somewhere between Heyer and Johanna Lindsey. The dialogue is snappier, the heroines are older and closer in age to the heros, and they tend to be more experienced.

Never heard of her. Hmmmm.

One of the problems with having an e-reader is that it is all too easy to buy books without having any awareness of spending money. Tap, tap, enter password, download, done. I think this is going to be an expensive month or two :shuffle:.

rfisher
03-12-2011, 01:29 PM
I'm surprised people still read those Regency type romances. I quit reading them back in the 70s. I moved on to the hardcore stuff so I could learn how many euphemisms there were for sexual structures. :lol: Jean Auel, Rosemary Rodgers and occasionally Lindsay....those were the days.

Prancer
03-12-2011, 04:54 PM
I'm surprised people still read those Regency type romances. I quit reading them back in the 70s. I moved on to the hardcore stuff so I could learn how many euphemisms there were for sexual structures. :lol: Jean Auel, Rosemary Rodgers and occasionally Lindsay....those were the days.

Oh, there are plenty of Regency romances these days that feature moist clefts and laving tongues and thrusting manhood and all that. I'm just not not in the mood, ha ha.

I'm stockpiling mysteries, too, if anyone has any suggestions there.

Wyliefan
03-12-2011, 05:28 PM
Read any of Heyer's mysteries? I know there was a discussion of them a while back, but they're worth recommending again, though a little formulaic in some ways. I think Duplicate Death is the best one of hers that I've read so far.

My absolute favorite mysteries, those, are Dorothy L. Sayers's. Gaudy Night isn't just my favorite mystery, it's one of my favorite books of all time.

BrokenAnkle
03-12-2011, 05:42 PM
I can't believe anyone else has heard of Joan Smith, her earliest ones are the best - Escapade, Aunt Sophie's Diamonds, Talk of the Town and Imprudent Lady. Very funny, although I would not say they bring home the regency period like GH

Another writer who does regencies(and georgians is Patricia Veryan, who died a couple of years ago. Hers are adventure/romance and have great characters and a strong thread of comedy throughout.

Georgette Heyer is my favorite comfort reads! I agree some of her heroines are silly, but as long as they are funny too I don't mind. For a very non-silly heroine, try Drucilla in The Quiet Gentleman. My all time favorite GH novel is The Foundling, which is hilarious and can hardly be classified as a romance, more like an adventure. Never warmed to her mysteries though.

Speaking of mysteries, right now I just finished reading the whole Ian Rutledge mystery series by Charles Todd. I found them very haunting, maybe a little too convoluted at times, but Rutledge is a great character. He really gets put the the wringer sometimes.

IceAlisa
03-12-2011, 06:07 PM
I finished The Poisoner's Handbook but in the end it was just a game to see how many chemistry mistakes I can catch. And I did catch a major one: she completely screwed up the mechanism of cyanide toxicity.

I've always been fascinated with cyanide's speed of action on the body vs. many other poisons. So when my biology prof mentioned it years ago, I listened hard and have remembered it well because finally, the mystery was solved. I am not going to bore you with the details but what happens is that cyanide shuts down the electron transport chain, stopping the production of ATP. ATP is the basic unit of energy in the body, required for pretty much everything, which explains why cyanide kills you so fast.

OTOH, the book says that cyanide binds with the hemoglobin, crowding out oxygen by what she implies is competitive inhibition. Bull. That's how carbon monoxide works. That's a pretty glaring mistake. And there were so many others caught by a biochemist reviewer on amazon. Shame on her! But it was an entertaining review of basic life sciences for me. :P

Now that I've had a stressful week, what with Mini Ice's visit to the ER and all, I am going back to my comfort zone and re-reading one of my faves--Austen's Emma. Thank goodness for Austen. I am convinced her work is the source of countless hours of comfort and entertainment for millions. :respec: