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Prancer
02-26-2011, 03:59 AM
I'm hopeful. If it's bad, I'll pretend it doesn't exist. :P

Good plan. I like it.:)

I have to finish Reacher quickly so I can move on to my next YA book about teens making decisions about death. So far I have read Before I Fall, Hold Still (http://www.amazon.com/Hold-Still-Nina-LaCour/dp/0525421556), and If I Stay, and now I have 13 Reasons Why (http://www.amazon.com/Thirteen-Reasons-Why-Jay-Asher/dp/1595141715/ref=pd_sim_b_7), and I'm eyeing The Hate List. (http://www.amazon.com/Hate-List-Jennifer-Brown/dp/0316041459/ref=pd_sim_b_1)

I think I need to get off this train :(.

Wyliefan
02-26-2011, 04:19 AM
I really want to read this one. It's on my wish list. :) Was in Costco yesterday and picked up: The Poisoner's Handbook (shoulda seen the look on hubby's face, :lol:) and Becoming Jane Eyre.

Becoming Jane Eyre wasn't bad -- not great, but not bad.

Unfortunately, the part about Charlotte's father's eye surgery has stuck in my mind longer than I would have liked. :scream: It's a very short passage and they barely get into it at all, but the couple of details they do mention are . . . memorable.

IceAlisa
02-26-2011, 04:36 AM
I hate eye surgery. One of the few things in medicine that grossed me out. :scream:
Will the interminable Sabine's diary ever end? It's leagues better than the Ash/LaMotte blather, though.

Spinner
02-26-2011, 04:43 AM
If I Stay
Did you like it? I have a co-worker who recommends it, but not sure if it'd be my typical pick.

PrincessLeppard
02-26-2011, 06:10 AM
I didn't buy the new Preston/Child collabration Gideon's Sword. The reviews were terrible. I may wait for the PB version. They should just stick with Pendergast. The last one was :kickass: The new Alexander McCall No. 1 Ladies Detective series is out tomorrow. :cheer2:

WHY IS MY LITERARY HUSBAND NOT IN IT???? Are they starting a new series? NOOOOOO. Bring back Pendergast! :mitchell:

Prancer
02-26-2011, 06:16 AM
Did you like it? I have a co-worker who recommends it, but not sure if it'd be my typical pick.

I did. In fact, I've liked all of the ones I listed there (at least the ones that I've read so far), with Hold Still being my favorite. I don't know that it's the best one, but I could really relate to the main character in that one.

rfisher
02-26-2011, 01:15 PM
WHY IS MY LITERARY HUSBAND NOT IN IT???? Are they starting a new series? NOOOOOO. Bring back Pendergast! :mitchell:

Yes to new series, although it's sort of a spin off. It turns out I did buy it after all. :shuffle: Guess I should pay more attention to what's in those bags at check out. Any way it relates tangentially to some of the Pendergast books. According to the web site, the next Pendergast is going to pick up the story of Constance and her evil spawn. I was so happy with Fever Dreams which was back to my svelte but :kickass: agent. I thought they were losing their touch with A Wheel of Darkness, but FD was back on track.

They really do best when they focus on Pendergast.

Prancer
02-26-2011, 09:28 PM
Yes and no about the husband. You'll figure out the plot in a couple more chapters.

I figured out all the big surprises (what the cargo was, where Seth came from, where Margaret disappeared) at the end in a couple more chapters, too. I thought those parts of it was pretty obvious. And Reacher just gets more unbelievably Superman-like in every book, and his Jedi mind tricks (which were kind of believable in the first couple of books) are now inducing eyerolls so big I give myself headaches.

I will probably read the next one, too :P.

Thirteen Reasons Why is brutal so far; I don't know if I could have read it in high school--too close to the bone. It's a good reminder of just how awful a normal, everyday high school can be. :scream:

rfisher
02-27-2011, 12:44 AM
I figured out all the big surprises (what the cargo was, where Seth came from, where Margaret disappeared) at the end in a couple more chapters, too. I thought those parts of it was pretty obvious. And Reacher just gets more unbelievably Superman-like in every book, and his Jedi mind tricks (which were kind of believable in the first couple of books) are now inducing eyerolls so big I give myself headaches.

I will probably read the next one, too :P.
:

:lol: I liked him when he thought like a cop. I am curious to see if Lee sends him to Virginia, even though he sent her away. The fact he used that connection in two books is interesting since it's been love em and leave em since Jodi. All the books have been optioned for movies. I wonder if they'll get around to making one.

dst7star
02-27-2011, 02:29 AM
Currently reading Wench by Dolen Perkins-Valdez. Waiting for the next Harlan Coben book in his Myron Bolitar series.

ChelleC
02-27-2011, 04:27 AM
I'm about to start The Tudor Secret by C.W. Gortner.

IceAlisa
02-27-2011, 11:39 PM
This is mostly directed at Wyliefan, my partner in crime reading Possession and anyone else who is interested. There will be SPOILERS.


I've finally finished the book last night and what an uneven ride that was. There were moments of brilliance and moments of mediocrity in this book, sometimes one directly following the other. More on that later.

1. Christabel's bitterness is understandable and striking. Ash seemed to have grasped it perfectly in his unfinished and unsent letter. He understood but she didn't turn to him, understandably afraid of losing her daughter.

2. Sabine's journals got interesting in the end but only because they elucidated Christabel's fate in Brittany. In themselves they were a tough slog to get through. I respect the incredible amount of work that went into each character's voice but at times it was a burden rendering the pleasure of reading pure academic rather than sensual and aesthetic. Although, the character of Gode was very well done. Incidentally, Byatt had a great passage on the pleasure of reading.

3. The few pages where Byatt explains or really spells out what was happening between Maud and Roland in Brittany are superfluous and annoying IMO. Such paranoia of being misinterpreted.

4. Leonora Stern doesn't speak French and is a stereotypical loud, grasping American although not as bad as the "cultural imperialist" Cropper.

Really, aren't scholars of European Literature required to speak more than one European language?

5. My favorite Ash letter is to Ellen when they were young and courting. What an exuberance of sexual metaphors of white roses and red poppies with their red skirts! That letter is sexuality bursting through its Victorian seams. Awesome. Ellen to me was actually ever so slightly more fascinating than Christabel and Ash and certainly more so than Maud and Roland.

My favorite Christabel letter is the one to Ellen.

6. Chapter 25 of the book is a real masterpiece (when Ellen is alone walking through the house on the eve of Ash's death).

7. My read of the Proserpine's Garden poem is, among other things an expression of Ash's suffering at Christabel's hands and her later poems (Milk, etc) are her suffering at his.

8. The part where Maud and Roland finally have sex was a huge, awkward letdown.

9. The part immediately following where Ash meets little Maia was beautiful.

Oh and I revise my opinion of the movie--a pale simulacrum of the book (how many times did Byatt use that word?)

zaphyre14
02-28-2011, 04:23 PM
I finished Saylor's "Arms of Nemesis" and plunged directly into "Catilina's Riddle" - this Roman kick goes on and on.....

Thant said, I do find Saylor's style to be a bit tedious at times, especially when his characters wax philosophical about Roman politics. "Riddle" is a bit dsconcerting since I begins 6 years after "Nemesis" and 17 years after the first tale in the series, "Roman Blood". I know there are several more books in the series; if there are similar gaps between each of them, Our Hero will be 90 and tottering around the streets of Roman with a cane and a guide dog! And I'm not sure I like the speed with which his adopted sons have grown up behind my back.... :)

Wyliefan
02-28-2011, 04:39 PM
This is mostly directed at Wyliefan, my partner in crime reading Possession and anyone else who is interested. There will be SPOILERS.


Ellen's story was so sad. I was partly miffed at her -- think how horrible that must have been for Randolph! -- and partly sorry for her. Too bad she couldn't have got help from a good doctor or psychiatrist or whatever.

(I typed "Roland" at first. I keep getting those names mixed up. :lol: )

I understand Christabel's fear, and why she acted as she did, but I can't help thinking she was cruel. Like the part where she confessed to thinking something like, "I know he's suffering, but that's just too bad. I've suffered, so now he can suffer." It's all very well to say that he upended her world, but he didn't force her. At the time she was all, "I'm in this all the way, no matter what." (I know, my 21st-century paraphrases are terrible!) And when it's consensual, well, it takes two to tango.

At least she repented of it in the end, and at least he did get to meet Maia once. Though I'm not quite sure how he discovered she was alive and where she was. Did I miss something?

As for Stern, Cropper, et al., I found it odd that they were brought into it at last when there was such a race to keep things from them before that. By the end it was like everyone was one big happy (weird) family. "We caught you grave-robbing, but oh well! Thanks for the loan of the pajamas!" Weird.

IceAlisa
02-28-2011, 05:50 PM
Yes, it absolutely horrible what happened to Ellen but understandable considering how little they understood and even saw their own bodies, let alone had a correct concept of sex. Very sad but I wonder if this was typical or least symptomatic of women's expectations of sex as being something truly awful. :(


I am ambivalent about Christabel. Part of me feels so terribly sorry for her. What a horrible time to be a single, unwed mother. Another part of me thinks that Ash has been unjustly punished and deprived of a daughter. I think Byatt didn't mean for this to be clear cut, which makes it interesting.

I think Ash may have wondered into the field where Maia was playing in order to try and see Christabel who was living with the family. He refers to wanting to see La Belle Dame Sans Merci (who else could it be) but meeting Maia instead.

I guess all the professors were obsessed with getting to the bottom of this, literally and figuratively and that's what bound them together. They were also trying to prevent Cropper from obtaining the letters at all cost, even if it means banding together. War makes unlikely bedfellows is how I see it. And the dubious moral stand against grave robbing is just what it is, dubious. In the end they allowed Cropper to do the dirty job and only then kept the letters. Very convenient. I don't think Byatt is trying to excuse anyone here. I think this is in keeping with the theme of Possession, of owning this material at all costs that everyone shared.