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Prancer
02-25-2011, 01:03 AM
Reacher drives a car! And he doesn't have random sex because he still thinks he wants to go to Virginia, albeit he's not in too big of a hurry since he has to stop off and save some strangers first.

Hmm, well, I got to the part where he drove the doctor to the restored farmhouse that was modest in size and immaculate in appearance. :P

I use the sentence "The ball was round in color and blue in shape" in class as an example of bad writing.

Don't tell me he's going to take on the abusive husband. He already did that in Eden Close, which is no longer the worst Reacher, but was for a long time.

I snickered out loud when I read the part about the abusive husband owning a poodle. All I could think of was Living Saint's former sig line "Satan is my poodle."

Someone should write a book about Living Saint flitting across the country on golden wings, performing miracles and saving souls :saint:


I loved If I Stay. I can't wait for the sequel coming out this spring.

I didn't know there was a sequel in the works. I'm not sure if I like that. The story seemed complete unto itself, although I guess a lot of people want to know what happens with Mia and Adam. But I kind of liked the ambiguity of it, because it indicated to me that Mia would go on no matter what happened with Adam, as she recognized that they very well might end up apart and chose to stay anyway.

IceAlisa
02-25-2011, 01:05 AM
I am getting close to finishing Possession, just in time because my copy of Johnny Weir's book has arrived. A welcome change of pace. :P

rfisher
02-25-2011, 01:19 AM
Hmm, well, I got to the part where he drove the doctor to the restored farmhouse that was modest in size and immaculate in appearance. :P

I use the sentence "The ball was round in color and blue in shape" in class as an example of bad writing.

Don't tell me he's going to take on the abusive husband. He already did that in Eden Close, which is no longer the worst Reacher, but was for a long time.

I snickered out loud when I read the part about the abusive husband owning a poodle. All I could think of was Living Saint's former sig line "Satan is my poodle."



Yes and no about the husband. You'll figure out the plot in a couple more chapters.

Prancer
02-25-2011, 12:54 PM
Yes and no about the husband. You'll figure out the plot in a couple more chapters.

He has just escaped crushing death by truck, and flaming death by truck explosion, and beaten the crap out of the moron truck driver. Safir has been frightened by Mahmeini over the supposedly mysterious cargo, which isn't at all mysterious even if Child is playing coy by not naming it.

I must say that I am finding the whole "I am sending two men" thing kind of funny. It's kind of like Noah's Psychotic Ark, with increasingly lethal pairs jumping on board the ship.

So far, I like this one better than the last one. I really disliked the Mexican midget drug lord in the last one. And I really wish Reacher would go somewhere warm for a while. I don't want to think about the icy, windswept plains any more this year.

luenatic
02-25-2011, 06:24 PM
Just finished reading "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" last night. It is very interesting. Maybe BBC can pick it up and do another documentary on the subject.

IceAlisa
02-25-2011, 06:25 PM
Just finished reading "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" last night. It is very interesting. Maybe BBC can pick it up and do another documentary on the subject.

I really want to read this one. It's on my wish list. :) Was in Costco yesterday and picked up: The Poisoner's Handbook (shoulda seen the look on hubby's face, :lol:) and Becoming Jane Eyre.

rjblue
02-25-2011, 07:46 PM
I'd never heard of Henrietta Lacks until the woman who wrote that book was interviewed on CBC a few weeks ago. I don't read much non-fiction, so I'm unlikely to buy the book, but I'd love to see a documentary on the subject. It's a fascinating story.

gkelly
02-25-2011, 08:18 PM
I've started reading American Subversive because a coworker gave it to me after finishing it in a day or two. I haven't gotten far enough myself to know what I think of it yet.

jeffisjeff
02-25-2011, 08:20 PM
Just finished reading "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" last night. It is very interesting. Maybe BBC can pick it up and do another documentary on the subject.

I read it recently as well. I really enjoyed it - so interesting and moving.

Matryeshka
02-25-2011, 11:15 PM
:lol:
I only hope fantasy fiction fans here have discovered David Eddings' work. His books read quickly and the stories are expertly-crafted. Sharp wit, strong female characters--Polgara, a legend!--and wonderfully woven plots make for some great reading. If you've not lost yourself into his worlds yet, start with Pawn of Prophecy (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/953173.Pawn_of_Prophecy) and enjoy :). It begins the 5-book Belgariad which is followed by the 5-book Malloreon with the same characters. His fans, though, tend to love his next works even more--The Elenium (3 books) and The Tamuli (3 books). .

I'm going to give the dissenting opinon on the works of David Eddings, or at least, a more critical one. Put up yer dukes, Spinner :revenge: When I was 19, I read The Belgariad--it was the first fantasy series I'd ever managed to finish, and as such, thought it was really great and insightful. I was not as impressed when I read The Malloreon or The Elenium/The Tamuli. When I re-read the whole Belgariad in my 20s, I wished I hadn't because what seemed insightful was either a) cliched, or b) clearly borrowed from other sources. And what IS his deal with blue glowing stones? Couldn't for once have at least a matte red triangle? I also found his writing style to be too neat--I'm sorry, I don't have a better way of putting it, too predictable, and waaay too repetitive in its themes. If you like subtlety in plot or characterization, you might want to give it a miss. :P

I also beg to differ about the character of Polgara--I found she got more shrill as the series went on and was just barely likeable towards the end of The Mallorean (though I agree she kicked serious ass in the first three books of The Belgariad). All the female characters devolved into either lesser versions of Polgara or charicatures of their earlier selves. Belgarath was too smug, and downright preachy at parts, and (Bel)garian didn't seem to learn a damn thing between series one and two. I really wish he would have let Belgarian grow up more (and let Belgarath be wrong a few times). And the whole thing ends with all the the ends so neatly trimmed and tied, it strangles the package of the story. He telegraphed the ending of The Mallorean from the moon. Don't even get me started on my opinions on the character of the Prophecy. :rolleyes:

I would recommend Eddings as a good introduction to fantasy because he IS very accessible and there are some really bwahahaha funny moments in his books. IMO, he's a good throwaway read when you don't want to think too much, but if you're looking for more than that...I'd look elsewhere. Though not at Robert Jordan. Anyone but Robert Jordan.

Runs before Spinner, Really, and any other Eddings fan can catch me...:P

In other reading news, I finished Water For Elephants, which is the first hyped book I've read in a long time that lives up to its buildup. I loved the photographs, the descriptions of circus life, and the parallels between how we treat animals and our elderly. I'm moving onto the new Robert Crais novel, The Sentry. This one features Joe Pike, and he'd better redeem himself because I'm about to consign Crais to my pile of Lost Authors (i.e., authors I used to love and now make me sad) with Jennifer Crusie and Janet Evanovich.

Spinner
02-25-2011, 11:26 PM
I'm going to give the dissenting opinon on the works of David Eddings, or at least, a more critical one. Put up yer dukes, Spinner :revenge:
:lol: Why would I do that? I liked them, you don't. *shrug* I'm certainly not comparing them to Tolkein, but as I said they're an easy read and yes, quite enjoyable for that.

rfisher
02-25-2011, 11:31 PM
In other reading news, I finished Water For Elephants, which is the first hyped book I've read in a long time that lives up to its buildup. I loved the photographs, the descriptions of circus life, and the parallels between how we treat animals and our elderly. I'm moving onto the new Robert Crais novel, The Sentry. This one features Joe Pike, and he'd better redeem himself because I'm about to consign Crais to my pile of Lost Authors (i.e., authors I used to love and now make me sad) with Jennifer Crusie and Janet Evanovich.

You may be sad then. The story is sort of sad because Pike acts like he's in love after one kiss. Nobody as hot as Pike should be that way. I really prefer the Elvis Cole books where Pike is the silent hunk in the background. :(

I didn't buy the new Preston/Child collabration Gideon's Sword. The reviews were terrible. I may wait for the PB version. They should just stick with Pendergast. The last one was :kickass: The new Alexander McCall No. 1 Ladies Detective series is out tomorrow. :cheer2:

Matryeshka
02-25-2011, 11:47 PM
:lol: Why would I do that? I liked them, you don't. *shrug* I'm certainly not comparing them to Tolkein, but as I said they're an easy read and yes, quite enjoyable for that.

But I like :revenge: ing. But you won't play. :wuzrobbed * And I didn't think they were so bad that they would be on the same level of the awfulness that is Tolkein. :P

Maybe I just don't like high fantasy :lol: They're sadly lacking in hawt vampires. Except Anne Bishop. She has some vampire-like devices in The Black Jewels trilogy.

Bah on Joe Pike in lurrrve. Though it starts well. I mean, what's better than a crazy, sociopathic assasin doing his thing while talking to his voices about the zombies?

RockTheTassel
02-26-2011, 12:14 AM
I didn't know there was a sequel in the works. I'm not sure if I like that. The story seemed complete unto itself, although I guess a lot of people want to know what happens with Mia and Adam. But I kind of liked the ambiguity of it, because it indicated to me that Mia would go on no matter what happened with Adam, as she recognized that they very well might end up apart and chose to stay anyway.

Yeah, I was kind of ambivalent when I first heard about the sequel, but I know a couple of people who were able to get advanced copies of it, and they really enjoyed it. Apparently in the sequel Adam and Mia aren't together, but they meet up a few years later, while she's still going to school in NYC. They talk about the past, and it's told from his point of view.

I'm hopeful. If it's bad, I'll pretend it doesn't exist. :P

Grannyfan
02-26-2011, 12:55 AM
In other reading news, I finished Water For Elephants, which is the first hyped book I've read in a long time that lives up to its buildup.

If you liked Water for Elephants I recommend The Final Confession of Mabel Stark by Robert Hough. I came across it by accident and absolutely loved it. It's a fictionalized biography of a woman who had a famous tiger act in the golden age of the circus. It's a really good story, and the circus stuff is fascinating. I read somewhere that there was a movie in the works with Kate Winslet and husband as director, but that was before they split so it may not happen. I like her, but she's physically nothing like the real Mabel as she's described in the book.

Right now I'm reading the latest Maisie Dobbs mystery, The Mapping of Love and Death. I think there's another one out in the spring.