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Buzz
02-11-2011, 02:46 PM
In my own defense at least I didn't pay for the thing. :shuffle: Happy to see I am not the only one who thinks this thing is silly beyond belief because I was actually worried that after reading so many WW2 books left me without the ability to recognise a "normal" book. I do appreciate the idea that inspired the story but not the story itself.

Prancer
02-11-2011, 03:11 PM
I tried to read 19 Minutes once, but the overwhelming stupidity of the plot twists made me stop.

I can suspend belief with the best of them, as long as you don't insult me.

Wyliefan
02-11-2011, 03:18 PM
I tried some Piccoult a few years ago as well. I figured something had to be appealing about it if she is selling that many books. I read three or four including My Sister's Keeper. I totally understand the "oh no she didn't" response. I think I did a lot of eye rolling and skipping entire chapters. She's a hack. But that begs the question: why are there so many best selling hacks?

Sometimes hacks, no matter how hackish they are, still have some glimmer of what it takes to keep a lot of people turning pages. (See also: Meyer, Stephenie.)

zaphyre14
02-11-2011, 03:22 PM
I feel the same way about Maeve Binchy and Danielle Steele. No clue as to why so many people think they're so wonderful.

Nan
02-11-2011, 04:02 PM
But that begs the question: why are there so many best selling hacks?

Some people don't want to think when they read.

dinakt
02-11-2011, 04:39 PM
:runs: :yikes: I went on a Jodi Piccoult kick a few summers ago. I call it The Summer of 1,000 Literary Trainwrecks. It consisted of a lot of "no, she didn't really write tha...she DID!" "OMG, this is even WORSE!" but she's so popular, surely she improv..."no! why can't I turn away?" Luckily, I regained my senses before being dragged into Piccoult land. I blame Dan Brown. Dan Brown is the alcohol version of the bad book gatekeeper. Had I never read The da Vinci Code due to it being popular, I'm sure I never would have picked up Piccoult. :mad:

BTW, My Sister's Keeper is one of the most ridiculous books I have ever read. Of course, I consider reading books that feature soulless Victorian spinsters who weild parasols and cavort with Scottish werewolves (SCOTTISH--can you believe?!) to be perfectly normal, so my judgment might not be all that high-falutin' either. :lol:
Snap!:lol:
I've never read her and now probably never will. Dan Brown sorely tested my patience because IMO the writing was very sloppy, and I also enjoy all kinds of fantasy. Soulless Victorian spinsters cavorting with werewolves sound fun. As long as the writing itself is good, bring it on.

jen_faith
02-11-2011, 11:51 PM
Snap!:lol:
I've never read her and now probably never will. Dan Brown sorely tested my patience because IMO the writing was very sloppy, and I also enjoy all kinds of fantasy. Soulless Victorian spinsters cavorting with werewolves sound fun. As long as the writing itself is good, bring it on.

The first Parasol Protectorate book was quite enjoyable in a quirky, steam-punky kind of way. The subsequent books were less quirky and more typical supernatural-romance stuff... :blah:

still... I am waiting for the next book... :shuffle:

rfisher
02-12-2011, 12:22 AM
Some people don't want to think when they read.

While I don't want to think, I also don't want to be bored.

PDilemma
02-12-2011, 12:26 AM
I feel the same way about Maeve Binchy and Danielle Steele. No clue as to why so many people think they're so wonderful.

Some of Binchy's earlier stuff is good just for the detail in which she creates those little Irish towns--I always feel like I've been to the places. A lot of her later stuff feels like she got tired and and started phoning it in, though.

Danielle Steele has just been churning out formulaic crap for a long career.

Back to Piccoult, 19 Minutes made me want to hurl the book out the window--which (to cross the threads) is an argument against ebooks. I would hate to spend money on an ereader then read something by a hack and toss the expensive ereader out my window. ;)

Prancer
02-12-2011, 02:09 AM
Back to Piccoult, 19 Minutes made me want to hurl the book out the window--which (to cross the threads) is an argument against ebooks. I would hate to spend money on an ereader then read something by a hack and toss the expensive ereader out my window. ;)

Man, I hated that book--at least what I read of it. There are very few books that I don't finish, and even when I decide I'm not going to do it, I read 100 pages just to make sure the book doesn't improve. If it's not good by 100 pages, I don't think it's going to get any better.

One of the annoying things about e-readers is how hard it is to delete items. Well, it's not hard, but it's sure not instantaneous and sometimes I just want something gone NOW :mad:.

On the Nook, you create shelves for your books as a sorting system (which you need desperately as soon as you own more than a few books). I have one shelf labeled "To Be Deleted" so I can keep track off all the ones I want gone and get rid of them in one sitting. B&N always helpfully asks if I wouldn't rather archive the books instead. NOOOOOOOO!

That one would have had to go immediately.

Erin
02-12-2011, 02:59 AM
Some of Binchy's earlier stuff is good just for the detail in which she creates those little Irish towns--I always feel like I've been to the places. A lot of her later stuff feels like she got tired and and started phoning it in, though.

I was just coming in to say the same thing. Circle of Friends, The Glass Lake, Echoes, and Light a Penny Candle are all great for that very reason. I'd list a few of her other books as good lighter fare reading when you're not looking for anything deep. Anything written after 2002 is a waste of the reader's time.

I'm glad I read this thread before I picked up Jodi Piccoult. Given the difficulty I've been having with finding books that I want to read that are available for e-books, I considered trying Piccoult. So relieved I didn't bother and went for another accounting-geek financial crime book instead.

Southpaw
02-12-2011, 04:30 AM
I just finished Netherland by Joseph O'Neill. Meh. The story would have been much more exciting and interesting if the entrepenuer Chuck Ramkissoon were the narrator instead of the boring and safe Dutch analyst. Oh well.

On to Swamplandia by Karen Russell.

Wyliefan
02-13-2011, 05:09 PM
Possession is picking up. I really liked the conversation about how "our metaphors eat up our world," and the descriptions of Yorkshire are amazing.

Spinner
02-13-2011, 08:57 PM
Reading Markus Zusak's The Book Thief (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Book-Thief/Markus-Zusak/e/9780375842207/?itm=1&USRI=the+book+thief) now. Interesting approach to yet another novel set in Nazi Germany. It's narrated by Death who has this odd apprension of humanity and centers around a 10 year old girl as she discovers a love of reading, writing and the beauty of language. Just over 100 pages in and I'm really enjoying it. Check out a short video of the author talking about this book on his Goodreads (http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/11466.Markus_Zusak) page. He's cute too! ;)

Prancer
02-14-2011, 12:31 AM
Not sure which of the many e-book-related threads to post this on :lol:, but I settled on this one:

Almost 4,000 Free Romance Ebooks for Valentine’s Day (http://drippler.com/barnes_and_noble_nook/almost-4000-free-romance-ebooks-for-valentine%E2%80%99s-day/?utm_source=Facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=facebook-pages)

You don't have to admit to reading them.;)