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IceAlisa
02-09-2011, 08:09 PM
You sound like William Shatner.

Pardon my culture gap, but why?

PRlady
02-09-2011, 08:11 PM
We'll make it--through--Wyliefan. Hang in--there. :P

Keep reading. [shakes finger at IA and WF] Possession is awesome. And when you're done, get The Children's Book, her most recent novel. Long but worth it.

I read straight science fiction for the first time in years, The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi. And came here to tell Princess Leppard to add it to her syllabus, it's a strangely awful and wonderful dystopian book, set in the near future.

Southpaw
02-09-2011, 08:16 PM
Pardon my culture gap, but why?

Behold the Master (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YW63vnU7yPI&feature=fvst)

skatingfan5
02-09-2011, 08:17 PM
My preferred punctuation in almost all of my personal writing is the dash. It is, I fear, a sign of a distracted and fragmented mind -- one not capable of enough sustained thought to compose a straight-forward sentence requiring only the assistance of a comma or two. :slinkaway

ETA: I have very good lung capacity.and do not require supplemental oxygen. :P

Wyliefan
02-09-2011, 08:23 PM
I tend to use them a lot myself . . . along with ellipses. :) But I don't think there's a person alive who uses them as much as they're used here. I don't even think that many Victorians did, did they? Not in their novels, at least. I haven't read that many Victorian letters.

AYS
02-09-2011, 08:53 PM
I can't believe it took me this long in my life to discover Georgette Heyer! I just read These Old Shades and am already on a second. Her characters are fabulous.


Pardon my culture gap, but why?
When Captain Kirk got particularly cheesydramatic at the end of the episode, he started to speak in this very deliberate, halting way.

Artemis@BC
02-09-2011, 09:14 PM
I use elipses -- and dashes -- all the time in online writing, but not nearly as frequently in "real" writing ...

Meanwhile, back to the books, I'm a few chapters into Fauna by Alissa York. I'm a sucker for any stories involving animals, and am liking this one so far.

PrincessLeppard
02-09-2011, 09:36 PM
I read straight science fiction for the first time in years, The Windup Girl by Paolo Bacigalupi. And came here to tell Princess Leppard to add it to her syllabus, it's a strangely awful and wonderful dystopian book, set in the near future.

I will check it out. Thanks!

Buzz
02-09-2011, 09:57 PM
My Sister's Keeper - Just started reading it. Not my usual cup of tea but it was a christmas present so I might as well give it a try. LOL

skatingfan5
02-09-2011, 10:04 PM
I can't believe it took me this long in my life to discover Georgette Heyer! I just read These Old Shades and am already on a second. Her characters are fabulous.I discovered Georgette Heyer's regency novels when I was in 9th or 10th grade. They are wonderful light reading -- and also highly addictive. :lol: I was in heaven when I discovered that my university's library had all of her novels -- quite a few were out of print at the time. Some of my favorites were A Woman of Quality, Frederica, and The Grand Sophy -- there were only two or three which didn't quite measure up. There was discussion of Heyer in a previous book thread, iirc.

zaphyre14
02-10-2011, 02:26 PM
I can't believe it took me this long in my life to discover Georgette Heyer! I just read These Old Shades and am already on a second. Her characters are fabulous.


"These Old Shades" is probably my favorite Heyer, or at least closely tied with "The Masqueraders." Stick with the historicals, though; her mysteries are not so wonderful.

Wyliefan
02-10-2011, 10:18 PM
her mysteries are not so wonderful.

I beg to differ! They can be rather formulaic, but she's got some really good ones. I think Duplicate Death is my favorite so far.

Matryeshka
02-10-2011, 11:14 PM
My Sister's Keeper - Just started reading it. Not my usual cup of tea but it was a christmas present so I might as well give it a try. LOL

:runs: :yikes: I went on a Jodi Piccoult kick a few summers ago. I call it The Summer of 1,000 Literary Trainwrecks. It consisted of a lot of "no, she didn't really write tha...she DID!" "OMG, this is even WORSE!" but she's so popular, surely she improv..."no! why can't I turn away?" Luckily, I regained my senses before being dragged into Piccoult land. I blame Dan Brown. Dan Brown is the alcohol version of the bad book gatekeeper. Had I never read The da Vinci Code due to it being popular, I'm sure I never would have picked up Piccoult. :mad:

BTW, My Sister's Keeper is one of the most ridiculous books I have ever read. Of course, I consider reading books that feature soulless Victorian spinsters who weild parasols and cavort with Scottish werewolves (SCOTTISH--can you believe?!) to be perfectly normal, so my judgment might not be all that high-falutin' either. :lol:

rfisher
02-10-2011, 11:27 PM
nah. I tried a Piccoult book on audio. Ejected after the second disc. I do not see what the attraction is or why her books sell so well. I was just glad the audio book was from the library and I hadn't wasted money on it instead of some good smutty literary treasure.

PDilemma
02-11-2011, 02:39 PM
I tried some Piccoult a few years ago as well. I figured something had to be appealing about it if she is selling that many books. I read three or four including My Sister's Keeper. I totally understand the "oh no she didn't" response. I think I did a lot of eye rolling and skipping entire chapters. She's a hack. But that begs the question: why are there so many best selling hacks?