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Satellitegirl
02-03-2011, 05:15 PM
I was just given Soulless by Gail Carriger, which is a novel of "vampires, werewolves, and parasols." So far, it's like if Delores Umbridge was made younger and fought on the side of good rather than evil. The author lives in the Colonies and has many Armenian lovers. I'm not sure about the book so far, but I definitely want to hang out with the writer. Anyone ever read a book like that--the novel itself didn't interest you, but something about it made you think you'd really love to go shopping with the writer?

I just came across this series while browsing the books on Kobo for my Literati, the other night. Can't wait to start reading it because it's right up my alley.

Here's the author's site http://gailcarriger.com/index.php

Love the witty humor :)

I love the Steampunk culture, as well.


How would you describe the Parasol Protectorate series for people who have been living under a rock and don’t know about it yet?
Imagine Jane Austen dabbling in science and steam technology. Then imagine P.G. Wodehouse suddenly dropped vampires into the Drones Club. The Parasol Protectorate books are the resulting progeny. They feature a soulless spinster confronting Queen Victoria’s grumpy werewolf investigator over the issue of lisping vampires.


If someone were to enter a bookshop, how would you persuade them to try your novel?
It’s got gay vampires, dirigibles, and madly wielded parasols in it. What more could you want from a book?

:lol:

IceAlisa
02-03-2011, 05:55 PM
I haven't been to the library to get new audio books (the pickings are getting slim) so I'm listening to the HP series again. I'm on CoS. I'm sad when reminded of how Ron is treated in the films because his wit is so engaging in the books and Hermione isn't the polished pretty girl Emma plays her. Plus, I always hear something I missed on the other twenty-eleven times I've listened to or read the books. :) Well, they did try to mess with her hair in the first movie or so but then gave up.


That's hardly anything new in a British novel. :)
True but this is likely to be the first time I bought it. The image of an earnest, ideological and somewhat sanctimonious and provincial American professor prone to lecturing foreigners about their own culture is very realistically done.
I can easily picture one.


As for Possession, I confess I got so bogged down early on that I nearly gave up. I've been trying to read so many things at once lately that my attention span is just about shot. The slow pace, and the need to read the poems and letters with care, nearly did me in. But I got through a few rough patches, and now I think I'll keep going. That is, if I can get it done before it has to go back to the library! I understand some of the poetry is pretty rich to digest and not necessarily the kind I enjoy so I didn't read it very closely. But I am pretty sure I will finish the book. I have the movie DVRed as it's fun to watch and read together. :)

smurfy
02-04-2011, 01:27 AM
Re - Possession. I too had a hard time getting into it due to the poetry. But I love mysteries and once I realized the poems had clues as to the past, I loved it. One of my fav books. Be patient.

dinakt
02-06-2011, 07:18 AM
Am reading " Abstinence Teacher" by Tom Perotta (it's been recommended to me since it got published in 2007, but I only picked it up now). I think it is excellent.

dinakt
02-06-2011, 07:25 AM
The narrator of the No1 Ladies Detective series is a South Africian woman. The protag in the book is a Botswana woman so the accent is correct. The diaglog coach on the short lived HBO series (I was so upset when the producer died and they didn't do another year) used the same accent so it's authentic. She's wonderful to listen to. I hear her voice in my head when I read the books.

I listened to many "#1 Ladies' Detectives Agancy" books, and happily concur- the narrator is first- class. I also really appreciate that we get to learn more about Botswana.

PrincessLeppard
02-06-2011, 02:38 PM
I'm reading the sequel to Forest of Hands and Teeth. I don't know why. I freakin' hated the first book, but I thought perhaps the author had gotten a clue this time. She hasn't. The character in this book (the daughter of the main character in the first book) is just as stupid as her mother.

And the author's idea of suspense (again) is to have her ALMOST get bitten by the zombies, until at the very last second, someone else rescues her.

Now I'm just reading to see what other dumb stuff she'll do.

Wyliefan
02-06-2011, 05:45 PM
Try Saplings (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Saplings/Noel-Streatfeild/e/9781906462086/?itm=2&USRI=saplings). The adult characters are a bit two-dimensional, but overall it's a good novel. Streatfeild wrote it for adults but the plot is centered on the children.

I finished Saplings yesterday. You were right, it was good. Really sad, but good.

Of course, my favorite character WOULD be the one who bought it. I sure know how to pick 'em. :(

Prancer
02-06-2011, 08:55 PM
I read A Reliable Wife (http://www.amazon.com/Reliable-Wife-Robert-Goolrick/dp/1565125967) during our ice storm, and let me tell you, it was a TERRIBLE choice. This book should only be read, if read at all, during the summer. Pages and pages of endless stretches of white, neverending blizzards, and people losing their minds and doing unspeakable things because they have been driven insane by the weather and the isolation :scream:.

I read it because so many of the critical reviews were good (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/04/07/AR2009040703559.html), and so many of the customer reviews were bad. I think "gothic potboiler" sums it up nicely. I thought it was pretty predictable, personally (the floor did not fall out except maybe once) but all the characters were so damaged and alone and damned that I kept reading just to find out if they were redeemed.

The book was apparently inspired by Wisconsin Death Trip (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wisconsin_Death_Trip), a book that seems designed to rudely smack people out of all their romantic notions about how life used to be in the Midwest, back in the good old days when people were better than they are now.

Allen
02-06-2011, 09:25 PM
Just finished Neal Stephenson's Anathem. I didn't like it as much as Snow Crash, but I found it extremely thought provoking and it was a quick read for such a huge novel.

Somehow, I've managed to get through life without reading The Portrait of a Lady, so I'm going to read it with the Victorian group over at Good Reads next month. Another group I'm in over there is going to do Kurt Vonnegut's Galapagos and I think I'll give that one a go as well. I've read a ton of Vonnegut, but never got around to reading Galapagos.

Wyliefan
02-06-2011, 09:31 PM
The Portrait of a Lady is really good. My favorite James novel, written before he developed all those annoying mannerisms that most critics consider brilliant and innovative. :) Enjoy.

IceAlisa
02-06-2011, 09:35 PM
The Portrait of a Lady is really good. My favorite James novel, written before he developed all those annoying mannerisms that most critics consider brilliant and innovative. :) Enjoy.

Exactly. :respec: I can't stand the meandering and verboseness of his late work. I believe we've discussed it here and I quoted Virginia Woolf on the matter.

I guess I am missing the Super Bowl Party today as I am too gorked out with my ear infection and meds so I will let the boys go and will curl up in bed with Possession and a cup of tea.

Prancer
02-06-2011, 09:45 PM
I guess I am missing the Super Bowl Party today as I am too gorked out with my ear infection and meds so I will let the boys go and will curl up in bed with Possession and a cup of tea.

If you went to the party, would you read anyway?

'Fess up, now. ;)

IceAlisa
02-06-2011, 09:46 PM
If you went to the party, would you read anyway?

'Fess up, now. ;)

Um, yeah. You got me there. :shuffle: :o

Prancer
02-06-2011, 09:50 PM
Um, yeah. You got me there. :shuffle: :o

:lol::lol:

I do that, too. But it's quieter and there are fewer interruptions at home. I don't think I could read Possession at a Superbowl party. Something trashy that doesn't require a lot of attention would be mandatory, though.

rfisher
02-06-2011, 09:51 PM
On Spinner's review, I got The Radley's. It was quite good. Certainly, not the typical vampire novel. Thanks, Spinner. :)

I picked up Grave Consequences by Dana Cameron. Cameron is an archaeologist who writes about an archaeologist. Except who has their character say things like "Who the deuces?" and Holy snappers? :rofl: I haven't even got to the murder yet.