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Nomad
01-19-2011, 11:37 PM
I just started My Home Is Far Away (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/My-Home-Is-Far-Away/Dawn-Powell/e/9781883642433/?itm=1) by Dawn Powell. Powell seems to favor two settings for her novels: Manhattan and small towns in Ohio. This one is set in the latter and looks like it will be an excellent coming-of-age story. I've read seven of her novels to date and she has never disappointed me yet. My favorite of her Manhattan novels is Turn, Magic Wheel (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Turn-Magic-Wheel/Dawn-Powell/e/9781883642723/pwb=1&) and my favorite Ohio novel is Dance Night (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Dance-Night/Dawn-Powell/e/9781883642716/?itm=2).

Prancer
01-21-2011, 08:11 PM
My latest book recommendation from B&N sounds like something right up PrincessLeppard's alley--The Water Wars (http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Explorations-The-BN-SciFi-and/The-Water-Wars-Is-Cameron-Stracher-s-New-YA-Dystopian-Thriller/ba-p/816458?cm_mmc=Facebook-_-nook-_-explorations-_-water_wars).

Set in a post-apocalyptic world where decades of criminal environmental recklessness has caused the polar caps to melt and all of the planet’s freshwater lakes and rivers to dry up, a huge percentage of the world’s dispossessed population has already died from drought, starvation, disease and war.

My favorite part has to be this, though:

The United States of America is no more – now the superpower of North America is the evil Empire of Canada

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

I'm reading U is for Undertow (http://www.amazon.com/U-Undertow-Kinsey-Millhone-Mystery/dp/039915597X) at last. I didn't know it was another split narrative book. I really didn't like the last one for that reason, but so far, this one isn't too intolerable.

Artemis@BC
01-21-2011, 08:55 PM
... My favorite part has to be this, though:

The United States of America is no more – now the superpower of North America is the evil Empire of Canada

:lol: Sounds like reason enough to put it on my reading list!

rfisher
01-21-2011, 09:05 PM
My latest book recommendation from B&N sounds like something right up PrincessLeppard's alley--The Water Wars (http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Explorations-The-BN-SciFi-and/The-Water-Wars-Is-Cameron-Stracher-s-New-YA-Dystopian-Thriller/ba-p/816458?cm_mmc=Facebook-_-nook-_-explorations-_-water_wars).

Set in a post-apocalyptic world where decades of criminal environmental recklessness has caused the polar caps to melt and all of the planet’s freshwater lakes and rivers to dry up, a huge percentage of the world’s dispossessed population has already died from drought, starvation, disease and war.

My favorite part has to be this, though:

The United States of America is no more – now the superpower of North America is the evil Empire of Canada

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

I'm reading U is for Undertow (http://www.amazon.com/U-Undertow-Kinsey-Millhone-Mystery/dp/039915597X) at last. I didn't know it was another split narrative book. I really didn't like the last one for that reason, but so far, this one isn't too intolerable.

It was just a matter of time before those evil Canadians exerted themselves.

I finished The Sentry by Robert Crais. Suspension of belief is all well and good, but if Mr. Crais wants me to believe Joe Pike was in love after a 15 minute coffee date and risked his life for a lying cheat, I'm going to need more sex. Which he didn't even get. Or he's painting my beloved Pike as a pathetic loser. I prefer to believe Crais lost his mind.

Artemis@BC
01-21-2011, 09:38 PM
It was just a matter of time before those evil Canadians exerted themselves.

Ah, The Canadian Conspiracy. Americans first started uncovering this secret in the film of the same name (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b04RzmSJyJE) in the 80s. Once that secret was out, it was over to RIM and the Blackberry. (You don't think it's just a phone, do you? Think "Rise of the Cybermen," only instead of cyborgs they're designed to turn you into humans with slightly more socialist leanings and considerably better tastes in humour, cheese, and beer.)

The water strategy isn't set for roll-out right away. But watch this space.

PrincessLeppard
01-22-2011, 04:44 AM
My latest book recommendation from B&N sounds like something right up PrincessLeppard's alley--The Water Wars (http://bookclubs.barnesandnoble.com/t5/Explorations-The-BN-SciFi-and/The-Water-Wars-Is-Cameron-Stracher-s-New-YA-Dystopian-Thriller/ba-p/816458?cm_mmc=Facebook-_-nook-_-explorations-_-water_wars)..

Sweet! And the Canadians are eville! I'll add it to my list.

Player One continues to hold up. I don't know what the Massey lectures are, so that may or may not be helping with my enjoyment.

oleada
01-22-2011, 07:07 AM
I finished the Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson, finally. It took me a while, and it's not a beach read, but it's most definitely compelling, wonderful and readable. The anecdotes are extremely powerful, and it's woven together beautifully. It definitely deserves all the praise it's been getting. There were parts - such as when one of the three featured characters votes for the first time - that made tear up. It's both heartbreaking and heartwarming.

But after finishing it I need something light next :lol: I'm kind of tempted by "The Lover's Dictionary" (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Lovers-Dictionary/David-Levithan/e/9781429994309/?itm=2&USRI=the+lover's+dictionary) by David Leviathan as it seems to fit what I need atm.

Spinner
01-22-2011, 06:24 PM
I finished the Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration by Isabel Wilkerson, finally. It took me a while, and it's not a beach read, but it's most definitely compelling, wonderful and readable. The anecdotes are extremely powerful, and it's woven together beautifully. It definitely deserves all the praise it's been getting. There were parts - such as when one of the three featured characters votes for the first time - that made tear up. It's both heartbreaking and heartwarming.
It was a fantastic book! You should look up some of Wilkerson's tales of the history of the book, it took her a long time to get to the finished product.

oleada
01-22-2011, 07:59 PM
It was a fantastic book! You should look up some of Wilkerson's tales of the history of the book, it took her a long time to get to the finished product.

Oooh, I should! I saw one interview with her in which she talked about her parents immigration story, which was great.

RockTheTassel
01-22-2011, 08:36 PM
I just started My Home Is Far Away (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/My-Home-Is-Far-Away/Dawn-Powell/e/9781883642433/?itm=1) by Dawn Powell. Powell seems to favor two settings for her novels: Manhattan and small towns in Ohio. This one is set in the latter and looks like it will be an excellent coming-of-age story. I've read seven of her novels to date and she has never disappointed me yet. My favorite of her Manhattan novels is Turn, Magic Wheel (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Turn-Magic-Wheel/Dawn-Powell/e/9781883642723/pwb=1&) and my favorite Ohio novel is Dance Night (http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Dance-Night/Dawn-Powell/e/9781883642716/?itm=2).

Dawn Powell's books always look intriguing. How did you like A Time to Be Born? I've had it on my to-read list for ages but haven't gotten around to it yet.

Nomad
01-22-2011, 10:01 PM
Dawn Powell's books always look intriguing. How did you like A Time to Be Born? I've had it on my to-read list for ages but haven't gotten around to it yet.

I enjoyed it. The main character is based on Clare Boothe Luce. I got the feeling that Powell didn't like her much. :) If you like Dorothy Parker then I'm sure you will like Dawn Powell.

Prancer
01-22-2011, 10:31 PM
I enjoyed it. The main character is based on Clare Boothe Luce. I got the feeling that Powell didn't like her much. :) If you like Dorothy Parker then I'm sure you will like Dawn Powell.

I can't remember who said it, but someone was famously quoted as saying something about Dorothy getting credit for all of Dawn's best lines.

Nomad
01-22-2011, 10:48 PM
^ I've read that somewhere, too. Maybe that exchange between Clare Boothe Luce and Dorothy Parker in a doorway (Parker allegedly wanting to be first) was actually between Luce and Powell.

DP: Ladies first.
CBL: Age before beauty.
DP: Pearls before swine.

Myskate
01-23-2011, 03:19 AM
I saw today that the new Jean Auel book will be out in March. It is called "The Land of Painted Caves." Amazon is pre-selling it so I guess it must be true. How long has it been since her last book? The first 3 chapters can be read so I will be doing that shortly.

zaphyre14
01-24-2011, 02:23 PM
I was unable to resist the lure of the familiar and so abandonned the Steven Saylor Roman mystery for Ruth Downey's "Caveat Emptor" - it was good but a little darker than I remember the previous one being. I like Ruso and Tilla as separate characters but their union seems constrained and oddly emotionless in spite of Tilla's passion to have a child.

And then I went on to Jayne Anne Krentz's "In Too Deep" - yet another entry in her Arcane Society series. Conspiracy theorists should like this one...

In the car, I have the abridged audio of Iris Johnasen's "Fatal Tide" to get me through traffic jams. Her skating novel "White Satin" has just been re-released in paperback; I remember reading it decades ago; I wonder if it's just a re-issue or if it's been updated at all. It should be pretty dated if it hasn't been.