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jen_faith
01-16-2011, 03:41 AM
Has anyone ever tried literature maps (http://www.literature-map.com/) ? It supposedly helps you find similar authors. So, I plugged in Terry Pratchett just to see and was a bit surprised at who came up n(e.g. Bill Bryson?). Still, it looked like a nifty tool and I was wondering if anyone had ever used it to find new authors?

PrincessLeppard
01-16-2011, 04:00 AM
Well, I like both Terry Pratchett and Bill Bryson. :)

barbk
01-16-2011, 08:25 PM
Has anyone ever tried literature maps (http://www.literature-map.com/) ? It supposedly helps you find similar authors. So, I plugged in Terry Pratchett just to see and was a bit surprised at who came up n(e.g. Bill Bryson?). Still, it looked like a nifty tool and I was wondering if anyone had ever used it to find new authors?

That's cool. Our library has NoveList, which tries to indicate similar authors. I tried a few authors I read a lot of, and the near hits were authors I also read -- but I few I haven't tried, and might.

Maybe people who read Terry Pratchett are quirky readers who also appreciate Bill Bryson's quirkiness?

Christina
01-16-2011, 11:36 PM
I just finished reading all three books by Suzanne Collins, at the behest of my BFF, who wanted a female to discuss them with. I liked Hunger Games and the second book. I do not like how the third book ended - it felt too rushed, like there could have been an entire other book written.

Did someone say she's coming out with a fourth book? :confused: The third wrapped everything up with a bow, I thought.

Back to reading the new Tom Clancy, which is even more tedious than his past books.

dinakt
01-17-2011, 01:19 AM
Is anybody else waiting for Tuesday release of Karen Marie Moning's "Shadowfever"? I can't wait. ( it's a dark urban fantasy based on Irish mythology, the last book (#5) is coming out Jan.18th)

Spinner
01-17-2011, 02:31 AM
Well, I like both Terry Pratchett and Bill Bryson. :)

Which of Bryson's books did you like?

PrincessLeppard
01-17-2011, 04:03 AM
All of them. :) Though my favorite is the one with the series of essays about his time immediately after moving back to the States after being away for a number of years. The title escapes me at the moment.

Evilynn
01-17-2011, 11:58 AM
I just won my first book in one of the giveaways on Good Reads, I'm so excited. I love that website, so I'm really glad I read about it on here. :cheer:

Make sure you review it, that's apparently a part of the algorithm that decides whether you'll win another book or not. :) (good review or bad seems irrelevant for future winnings, as long as there is one :))

I quite liked PopCo, even if the very first cipher in it had an error in the key. Was I the only one who bothered translating it? :lol: Got through Iain Banks's "The Wasp Factory", but like "The Algebraist" I could take it or leave it. I'm going to try to read a more recent Banks noir/gothic and one of his higher rated SFs and see if I just picked duds so far. Everybody keeps recommending him to me, and I just can't think of the books I've read as more than "good". In order to read something that I was fairly sure would meet my expectations I started reading Fahrenheit 451 instead.

jen_faith
01-18-2011, 02:00 AM
Which of Bryson's books did you like?

Weeelll... I know you weren't talking to me but I'll add my two bits anyway...
I really liked his books on language: The Mother Tongue (http://www.amazon.com/Mother-Tongue-Bill-Bryson/dp/0380715430/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1295315606&sr=1-1) and Made in America (http://www.amazon.com/Made-America-Informal-History-Language/dp/0380713810/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1295315738&sr=1-1) . Although according to reviews on Amazon, the Mother Tongue is full of factual errors. I also have really enjoyed his travel books, especially the ones about hiking in the Appalachians. I did not particularly enjoy his last book At Home: A Short History of Private Life (http://www.amazon.com/At-Home-Short-History-Private/dp/0767919386/ref=pd_bxgy_b_text_b). I guess it was because the book largely focused on the Victorian era and I find that era a bit boring.

Prancer
01-18-2011, 02:51 AM
All of them. :) Though my favorite is the one with the series of essays about his time immediately after moving back to the States after being away for a number of years. The title escapes me at the moment.

I'm a Stranger Here Myself (http://www.amazon.com/Im-Stranger-Here-Myself-Returning/dp/076790382X/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpi_6).

PrincessLeppard
01-18-2011, 03:43 AM
That's it! I wasn't out of the country as long as he was, but it was still weird to come back seven years later. :)

I'm reading Douglas Coupland's Player One. It's......interesting. But all the books I've read lately start interesting and then spin off into chaos, so I'm hoping that's not the case here.

zaphyre14
01-18-2011, 04:07 PM
I'm still on the historical mystery kick - finished Hamilton's "A Marked Man" and wondered how a woman from Lousianna who now lives in California could get the whole Colonial New England vibe down so well. She's done a heck of a lot of research on geography and climate as well. I liked it a lot.

Now I'm jumping back even further to 80AD Rome in Steven Saylor's "Roman Blood." I probably shouldn't have started it since I have Ruth Downey's latest also in the B&N bag and that's set in roughly the same era, but this was the first one I grabbed late last night. And now that I'm into it, I excpect I'll have to finish it and then read something more modern for a bit before I can get back to Downey.

Artemis@BC
01-18-2011, 05:21 PM
I'm reading Douglas Coupland's Player One. It's......interesting. But all the books I've read lately start interesting and then spin off into chaos, so I'm hoping that's not the case here.

I was quite disappointed in that one. When I first heard he was doing the Massey lectures in the form of a novel, I thought "Ok, cop-out ... but could be interesting." In the end I don't think it was entirely successful as either a novel (and particularly a post-apocalyptic novel) or a lecture, but the lecture was the better format of the two IMO.

I just checked the CBC web site (http://www.cbc.ca/ideas/episodes/massey-lectures/2010/11/08/massey-lectures-2010-player-one-what-is-to-become-of-us/) and the streaming audio files are no longer available, although you can buy the podcast or CDs.

MikiAndoFan#1
01-19-2011, 05:24 PM
Today I was searching for some books at the school library and I came across Fire on Ice: The Exclusive Inside Story of Tonya Harding. :eek: I had no idea that book was there. Anyway, I had to take it with me. I haven't had the chance to read much yet, since I haven't had time, but I've already read the prologue and a bit of the first chapter. I'm shocked at the things Tonya's mother did to her. :(

I plan on finish reading the book this week. :)

immoimeme
01-19-2011, 10:49 PM
The library just happened to have recently purchased "The Unbearable Lightness of Being" so I got it. It's surprisingly philosophical and is certainly helping me understand why the movie of it seemed so flat.