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Allen
12-30-2010, 04:32 AM
I did just think of another field, Advertising, that might be worth my researching but figured I'd ask here too. It's "practical" at least in theory, and does require a certain amount of creativity.

None of the people I know who have degrees in Advertising are actually working in Advertising. I do, however, know a person with a degree in graphic design who is an art director at a very well-respected advertising agency in Chicago.

galaxygirl
12-30-2010, 06:02 AM
I did just think of another field, Advertising, that might be worth my researching but figured I'd ask here too. It's "practical" at least in theory, and does require a certain amount of creativity.

Are you currently in school? If so, they will likely be able to provide you with both counseling and career interest and/or personality surveys such as Strong-Campbell or the MBTI. These may help you narrow down your interests or even lead you to an area that you hadn't thought of before.

LordCirque
12-30-2010, 06:37 AM
another area of interest.... That's all I need :lol:

Yes, I am currently in school. Budgets are so bad at my school right now though, students only get one counseling appointment a semester right now.

Angelskates
12-30-2010, 07:16 AM
LC - what are you studying at the moment?

LordCirque
12-30-2010, 07:40 AM
I guess if I had to pick something to say I'm studying, I'd say Creative Writing, but I'm basically just finishing my General Ed classes for transfer (had a few that didn't get taken in my first round at Community College), and taking classes in areas of interest at the same time.

Next Semester I'm taking Logic (critical thinking requirement), Interpersonal Communication (speech requirement without having to take speech, and I figure it will enhance my writing, and it sounds more interesting than Speech), Theater (for alternative performance outlets, writing enhancement, and personal interest), Anthropology Lab (to get an idea if this might be worth pursuing further, at least as a Minor), Playwriting, and Fiction Writing at the recommendation of the Creative Writing professor. I'm waitlisted for Forensic Chemistry and Voice.

This past semester I took News Writing, Intro to Creative Writing, Intro To Physical Anthropology, Voice, and some classes related to the Student Dance Concert that I put a piece of choreography in.

Angelskates
12-30-2010, 07:45 AM
I guess if I had to pick something to say I'm studying, I'd say Creative Writing, but I'm basically just finishing my General Ed classes for transfer (had a few that didn't get taken in my first round at Community College), and taking classes in areas of interest at the same time.

Ahh, so you're doing general ed. I can't remember, what happened with the cooking, the dance, and the circus/acrobats? Are you still doing them?

Do you have a part time or casual job? Sometimes these help people find out what they are and are not interested in, and narrow down areas, as well as giving valuable experience. Even volunteering is a great option for this (as well as contributing to your local community :))

LordCirque
12-30-2010, 07:50 AM
I've done some volunteering on LGBT issues in the area, not a lot but a little.

Circus- No, injuries and the practicality of that took me out. What's frustrating is I've recently found out how easily corrected the injury that took me out is, and that if I'd continued my training, I'd probably have a performable, sellable act by now (and thus, be making making money right now), the timeline I was given was 2-3 years for the act I'd begun working on, and it's now 2-3 years later. I tried for something more practical (at the advice of many in this very thread) that didn't pan out. :wall: I wish I hadn't though. One of my biggest regrets, and it's only recently when telling my boyfriend about my days of training and how much I miss it that I've realized how much I really do miss it and did love it. I don't know if I have the physical or emotional stamina to start from the ground up on that again, since that's basically what I'd be doing if I went back now.

Dance- Yesish, I'm still doing the work studying program at my dance studio working the desk in exchange for class, and doing small productions and choreography here and there. I do have someone pushing me to pursue an MFA in Dance to eventually teach at a University. She has an MFA in Dance. (See above edit to post). I have knee tendinitis in both knees right now, as well as both shins, and tennis elbow in both arms (the injury that took me out of circus, but I also recently foudn out exactly what it was and easily correctable it is). I've come to terms that I'll probably never have the career I dreamed of having as a dancer, and to terms with the fact that I'm a better choreographer than dancer. I am still examining if there is any future for me still here somewhere. I'm not ruling it out completely yet but I'm exploring other areas as well.

Cooking- I discovered I'm a home cook. I love cooking, but the pace and chaos of a professional just isn't for me. I don't thrive in those environments and that's key to surviving in the industry.

Job- Still searching but not much luck, though I guess working in exchange for my dance classes is working, it definitely is work, as it involves money, phones, cleaning, etc...

Gazpacho
12-30-2010, 10:37 AM
First of all, it's reassuring to know that you're considering community colleges and public universities. Stay the hell away from private schools, especially for-profit ones.

Have you considered vocational school? At my high school reunion, many of the most financially well-off students were those that finished at the bottom of the class and went to vocational school to become auto mechanics and plumbers.

Ask yourself, what are you good at? Are you good at sales? If so, perhaps you can be a bridal consultant. I don't think that requires any degree. Are you coordinated with your hands? Then a hairdresser may be a good option. For both, I think it's easier if you are clearly gay, like Carson Kressley-ish. Women love gay bridal consultants and hairdressers. Ever see Say Yes to the Dress? Part of Randy's success is that he's very obviously gay.

By the way, where do you live?

modern_muslimah
12-30-2010, 12:42 PM
Are you currently in school? If so, they will likely be able to provide you with both counseling and career interest and/or personality surveys such as Strong-Campbell or the MBTI. These may help you narrow down your interests or even lead you to an area that you hadn't thought of before.

Definitely! My mother took the MBTI while at a CC and that helped her to determine that she wanted to be a social worker.

There's a great book called Do What You Are (http://www.amazon.com/What-You-Are-Type-Revised-careers/dp/0316880655) which focuses on MBTI as a way to find a career. The book definitely provides a lot of insight on why some people may prefer jobs where there's lot of interaction with people while other may prefer more solitary jobs or why some people prefer to have a hands on job while others may hate that type of job.

The book was recommended to me after I spoke to a family friend. He asked what I wanted to do and I listed three completely different things. This was after I had my BA. :lol: LC, there's a lot of us in your boat although I think you do get to a point where you have to decide to do something. As others have mentioned, you can always do the things you love outside of your job. I love to write about issues affecting Muslim women but it has never been my job.

GarrAarghHrumph
12-30-2010, 01:47 PM
None of the people I know who have degrees in Advertising are actually working in Advertising. I do, however, know a person with a degree in graphic design who is an art director at a very well-respected advertising agency in Chicago.

Yes. In general, from my observations here in NY, you'd major in graphic design - and be very good at it - before working some years as a designer, and then working toward becoming a creative director/art director, etc. The alternative is to be in account management - the face of the agency to their clients. For that, you'd probably major in something like business or marketing, maybe minor in advertising; but in reality, any major will do. What's key is that you gain related experience while you study - internships, etc. But advertising is a highly competitive field to get into, even to get an internship in.

GarrAarghHrumph
12-30-2010, 01:49 PM
another area of interest.... That's all I need :lol:

Yes, I am currently in school. Budgets are so bad at my school right now though, students only get one counseling appointment a semester right now.

Often, the tests mentioned are offered by the career center on campus, rather than your academic advisor/counsellor. So call the career center.

And rather than widening your focus, they can narrow it. You'll start to see trends. The tests can help you match your skills and interests up with potential careers, which you can then use to help pick majors.

PrincessLeppard
12-30-2010, 02:00 PM
Circus- No, injuries and the practicality of that took me out. What's frustrating is I've recently found out how easily corrected the injury that took me out is, and that if I'd continued my training, I'd probably have a performable, sellable act by now (and thus, be making making money right now), the timeline I was given was 2-3 years for the act I'd begun working on, and it's now 2-3 years later. I tried for something more practical (at the advice of many in this very thread) that didn't pan out. :wall: I wish I hadn't though.

So....it's our fault you aren't performing right now? And how marketable do you think a trapeze act is right now? And who gave you this timeline?

I haven't seen that you have tried anything practical at this point. You don't have a job of any sort, even a part-time job at a clothing store or something like that. I know what it's like to not be able to be successful in your passion; I was supposed to be winning my Oscar for best original screenplay at 30. It didn't happen, and after a year in the film industry, I realized I had to do something else if I wanted to eat.

flyingsit
12-30-2010, 02:53 PM
Part of the trick is finding not just what you're interested in, but what you're GOOD at, and then finding a way to use what you are good at to keep a foothold in your interests.

LordCirque
12-30-2010, 06:12 PM
@PL: The person training me for the act, most circus acts don't take as long for people to learn as they think. And going to Culinary School seems pretty practical to me. Considering all of my professional circus friends are actively working even in this economy, I'd say marketable enough to have SOME income, more than I'd make at a clothing store, definitely more than I'm making right now.

@Grr et all, I did that career test the first time at Community College, the MBTI, is what they gave us, everything I've explored thus far was on the list. I go between an INFP and an ISFP. I might go to B&N or Borders today and sit down with it again though.

I live in San Diego.

Trade School: No, I'd be miserable and I'm TERRIBLE with screwdrivers, hammers, and all that. I struggle even putting Ikea stuff together. I'm lucky I can plug in a lamp and use a stove. :lol:

I'd thought of Hairdressing at first, but my knife/hand skills were not that great in Culinary School so I have no reason to think I'd be that good as a hairdresser either.

galaxygirl
12-30-2010, 07:01 PM
@Grr et all, I did that career test the first time at Community College, the MBTI, is what they gave us, everything I've explored thus far was on the list. I go between an INFP and an ISFP. I might go to B&N or Borders today and sit down with it again though.

I'd thought of Hairdressing at first, but my knife/hand skills were not that great in Culinary School so I have no reason to think I'd be that good as a hairdresser either.

You can also take similar tests online. Here's one:

http://www.keirsey.com/sorter/instruments2.aspx?partid=0

Based on what I've read of your postings on FSU and the careers you've tried already, I'd guess that you are either an ISFP or an ESFP (or borderline between E and I). But that's just an uneducated guess. :)

Also, I'm guessing that a lot of success in hairdressing is due to the ability to visualize three dimensionally. And you don't need to cut as quickly when cutting hair as you do when you're cooking, so I do think that is something that you still may be able to do if you are really interested in it. It might not hurt to talk to a beauty school.