PDA

View Full Version : Comparative Literature Major



Pages : 1 2 3 4 5 6 [7] 8 9 10 11

Anita18
12-29-2010, 09:13 PM
a) This is a "specific" of one person that you know, and I am sure many others.. but still.... Some take loans, some don't. It does not hurt to work your way through college. It's been done by millions, people work their way through higher education, without "student loans", or grants, or scholar-ships.... Sure it’s harder…. But as we say in Russia, “the only thing that’s easy – is cheese in a mouse-trap”.

b) 5-figure salary can be 19,000 USD per year….. or 99,000 USD per year….

It's a tough world out-there.... every decision costs something.
Sure, but I know more people who went to law school than med or grad school...and nearly all of them are looking to a mountain of debt when they graduate. Only PhDs get stipends so they don't have to graduate with that debt. Law school and med school you have to pay a lot of $$$$$. I'm not sure if that's the case where you are, or what you're familiar with. You HAVE to take on that debt unless you or your family is filthy rich. There are some scholarships, but it's hard to get, especially with a competitive student body.

And when you're in med/law school, there's no time to have a job in addition to the schoolwork, aside from summer internships. The people I know in med school basically fall off the face of the earth until they graduate.

I was referring to 5-figures in the hole, ie, their debt, what they'd have to pay back the school once they finish their education whether they find a job or not. :lol: There might have been some misunderstanding there.


I wasn't even thinking of jobs specific to Anthropology or Archaeology, I was thinking of basic science lab jobs that I remember seeing old classmates of mine talk about when they finished their biology degrees.
I have such a job, in cancer research/microbiology, and you can't get a foot in the door unless you have a bachelor's in biology/molecular bio and some experience working in a lab. My boss even talked about how tough it would be for someone vying for a lab job, who had to work at Starbucks during the summer in college instead of taking on an unpaid lab internship. It's unfair, but that's how the market is. I was able to do it because I had a relative who hooked me up with an internship AND provide room and board. It's possible to find paid lab internships if you look hard enough and push hard enough, but very difficult because there are a ton of other people willing to take on the same position for free.

My job pays the bills, but I'm lucky in that my parents paid nearly all of my college tuition. (And I am CRAZY cheap - unfortunately I think you'd have to give up your extracurriculars like dance class.) It would be possible to pay back public school loans on my salary, but you'd have to be very frugal to do it.

agalisgv
12-29-2010, 10:19 PM
does anyone know anything about the quality of The New School in NYC? Is considered a reputable university or is it looked at on the same level of National University and University of Phoenix and the like? The New School used to have an excellent reputation for the liberal arts. They were on the cutting edge of a lot of the contemporary theories coming out of the humanities and social sciences. It was very 'in'--very cool and edgy. But it has dramatically declined over the years and a shadow of what it once was.

Garr and Prancer will have better perspectives on this, but IMO no liberal arts or social science degree will be considered worth very much if it comes from an online program. Online degrees have a place I suppose, and they can work for professional degree programs that require students obtain accreditation of some sort (eg. masters in education), but for the liberal arts and social sciences? Not so much.

I do know a fair amount of MLIS programs are done online today. But they are still a part of brick and mortar institutions. They do that to develop computer and internet literacy.

Rob
12-29-2010, 11:19 PM
Sure, but I know more people who went to law school than med or grad school...and nearly all of them are looking to a mountain of debt when they graduate. Only PhDs get stipends so they don't have to graduate with that debt. Law school and med school you have to pay a lot of $$$$$. I'm not sure if that's the case where you are, or what you're familiar with. You HAVE to take on that debt unless you or your family is filthy rich. There are some scholarships, but it's hard to get, especially with a competitive student body.

And when you're in med/law school, there's no time to have a job in addition to the schoolwork, aside from summer internships. The people I know in med school basically fall off the face of the earth until they graduate.

I was referring to 5-figures in the hole, ie, their debt, what they'd have to pay back the school once they finish their education whether they find a job or not. :lol: There might have been some misunderstanding there.


I worked part time through law school except for the first semester when they don't really let you. I organized my schedule so I could work a whole day and two half days as a clerk in a corporate law department. You just have to study every day in all your free time and on the weekends. There also are evening programs for those who work full time, but it just takes a bit longer to finish. Plus, if you work in the summers at a big firm, you make real money. It is NOT public interest law though. If you want to save the world, the world does not pay well.

I also went 70k in the hole even with a partial scholarship, but I was able to pay it off in ten years. You can consolidate and pay over 30. However, all bets are off right now on getting a job. Right now, firms are not making new offers, and they are postponing start dates for people they made offers to years ago. This has been going on a long time. Maybe if you are starting now, 3 years is long enough for the economy to turn around.

The awful thing is that many of my law school friends who did not get permanent jobs during the 90s recession wound up getting stigmatized as " just a contract attorney" (attorneys who are hired on temporarily for big cases to review and produce documents and the like). It is snobby, but they never got the "right" experience as an entry level attorney so they never really found the kind of permanent jobs they would have gotten if they had come out 1-3 years later. Sounds strange, but firms would often rather hire brand new grads than 2nd or 3rd years who were contract attorneys and are willing to be cut back to a first year -- they think there must be some reason besides the economy that they did not find permanent jobs within a year of graduating. I wonder where the current market will play out -- there have been many huge layoffs, and there are some top grads whose start dates have been pushed way out. Hopefully there will be a market for mid levels when they need to fill vacant class years.

dbell1
12-29-2010, 11:24 PM
So, it's no longer 'comparative literature' and it's now 'forensic science'? Really? :lol: That didn't take long.

LordCirque
12-29-2010, 11:33 PM
God forbid I ask questions about more than one area of study :rolleyes:

numbers123
12-29-2010, 11:48 PM
I'll say it again--you need a Plan B.

I agree and a plan B and C for additional jobs when you graduate. Life expenses get in the way of what you want to do.
College educations cost $$$$$$$, and if you do get a job you will need more than one to pay the loans. My son and dil are out of college now 6 years and are still trying to get a handle on their student loans. And it took them nearly 12 months to get a job in their fields, during a time that jobs were somewhat plentiful. There are many people who are working a second or third job to pay the rent.

Sometimes reality is a bitch.

UMBS Go Blue
12-30-2010, 12:28 AM
So, it's no longer 'comparative literature' and it's now 'forensic science'? Really? :lol: That didn't take long.If we loosely interpret "forensic science," then there are some pretty good, and rather ironic, jobs (http://www.acfe.com/career/fraud-examination-careers.asp) out there.

Anita18
12-30-2010, 12:47 AM
I worked part time through law school except for the first semester when they don't really let you. I organized my schedule so I could work a whole day and two half days as a clerk in a corporate law department. You just have to study every day in all your free time and on the weekends. There also are evening programs for those who work full time, but it just takes a bit longer to finish. Plus, if you work in the summers at a big firm, you make real money. It is NOT public interest law though. If you want to save the world, the world does not pay well.

I also went 70k in the hole even with a partial scholarship, but I was able to pay it off in ten years. You can consolidate and pay over 30. However, all bets are off right now on getting a job. Right now, firms are not making new offers, and they are postponing start dates for people they made offers to years ago. This has been going on a long time. Maybe if you are starting now, 3 years is long enough for the economy to turn around.
Oh yeah, I just remembered my neighbor from when I was in high school was doing such night classes while working full-time. Seemed rather insane. :lol:

Why were we talking about law school again? Oh right, people went into law thinking they were gonna fall into big money and finding it not a sure thing. :lol: Right when my friend graduated was when the biglaws were starting to bleed majorly. Talk about bad timing.


So, it's no longer 'comparative literature' and it's now 'forensic science'? Really? :lol: That didn't take long.
Eh, reminds me of my cousin, who was choosing between MD/PhD or a job on Wall Street. He might be regretting his choice right now because med school is kicking his ass. :lol:

Sparks
12-30-2010, 01:14 AM
I worked part time through law school except for the first semester when they don't really let you. I organized my schedule so I could work a whole day and two half days as a clerk in a corporate law department. You just have to study every day in all your free time and on the weekends. There also are evening programs for those who work full time, but it just takes a bit longer to finish. Plus, if you work in the summers at a big firm, you make real money. It is NOT public interest law though. If you want to save the world, the world does not pay well.
Right. And at some law schools, one is not allowed to work at all.

numbers123
12-30-2010, 01:23 AM
Why were we talking about law school again? Oh right, people went into law thinking they were gonna fall into big money and finding it not a sure thing. :lol: Right when my friend graduated was when the biglaws were starting to bleed majorly. Talk about bad timing.

My brother who has worked in family law, labor relations law and housing something or other law has been unemployed for 3 years now since the housing market began to fail. There are no careers that are a sure bet these days, especially when trying to make them last for 40 years or so.

Anita18
12-30-2010, 01:39 AM
My brother who has worked in family law, labor relations law and housing something or other law has been unemployed for 3 years now since the housing market began to fail. There are no careers that are a sure bet these days, especially when trying to make them last for 40 years or so.
Which is why I think it's amusing that people are bagging on LC for not pursuing career-viable majors. :P

Though, I think the point is that if you're gonna go to university anyway (and not pay $$$ for graduate schooling), you might as well major in something more...potentially career-viable? :lol:

GarrAarghHrumph
12-30-2010, 01:54 AM
Outside of it's ties to Project Runway and former ties to Inside The Actor's Studio, does anyone know anything about the quality of The New School in NYC? Is considered a reputable university or is it looked at on the same level of National University and University of Phoenix and the like?

When researching colleges and universities that aren't well known or state run colleges, what are some things to look for and what are red flags to look for?

You can always ask about a school here. You can also look schools up on the US News and World Report website (for example, to get their ranking, type in "The New School" and "US News and World Report", and you'll see they are a tier 2 or 3 school overall - in other words, fine, but not elite. I also second what another poster said - the school used to be considered kind of cutting edge, but has fallen down in rep over the years. They do offer some intriguing programs, though.

What you won't see from all that is that they do have some very highly regarded programs, including, as I understand it, those in creative writing, Parsons, Mannes, and the Actor's Studio.

You can also ask college questions on the Yahoo Answers higher ed board, or on College Confidential.

In general, a major red flag to look out for is whether or not a school is proprietary/for profit, like U of Phoenix is. Even if they're regionally accredited (the type of accreditation any school you look at should have), if the school is proprietary, it's a watch-out. Academics and employers do not really like such schools, in general. There are some exceptions, though - SVA, SCAD, Digipen, etc. are all proprietary and are all respected. But those are the exception, rather than the rule.

As for the reputation of a program - to be entirely honest, at the undergrad level, generally speaking, it's not really *about* the reputation of your program. So long as your school is academically decent, and the program there is sound, IMO, its ranking, at the undergrad level, in the fields you're looking at, does not matter. It's at the grad level where rep is key. At the undergrad level, again, so long as your school and program is sound, it's more about what you do to take advantage of what your school has to offer you - independent studies, internships, writers groups, etc. And what that means, IMO, is that unless you are independently wealthy, one of the major things you need to think of in terms of the "fit" of a school or a program for you is its cost. You are a CA resident, yes? The UCs and Cal States are going to be your least expensive option, as a transfer student, because to be honest, most merit aid (aid based on grades) goes to entering freshmen, not to transfer student (you'll still get aid based on income, but it's limited.) Going to a public school in your home state means that you'll have to take out less in student loans. Having less of a student loan burden will give you the freedom to do what you want when you graduate - including moving to an expensive city like NYC. So IMO, as someone who runs a side business advising students looking at colleges, I strongly recommend that you include some UCs and Cal States on your list. See where you get in. See what the aid packages look like. See how much in loans you'd need to take out for each school. Then decide.

Student loans are not something to take lightly. They can cripple you. It's especially important to stay away from *private* student loans. IMO, if you need a private student loan in order to attend a school, that school is too expensive for you, and you need to look elsewhere.

heckles
12-30-2010, 02:42 AM
Student loans are not something to take lightly. They can cripple you. It's especially important to stay away from *private* student loans. IMO, if you need a private student loan in order to attend a school, that school is too expensive for you, and you need to look elsewhere.

Maybe LC's first literature class will explore Shakespeare's Hamlet!

Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.

Prancer
12-30-2010, 03:14 AM
Garr and Prancer will have better perspectives on this, but IMO no liberal arts or social science degree will be considered worth very much if it comes from an online program.

ITA. But didn't LC say in another thread that he hates online classes and doesn't learn well that way? That should eliminate the online degree right there.

LordCirque
12-30-2010, 03:16 AM
Yeah, I'd never even consider an Online Degree program. Unless the Professor posted videos of lectures and the professor had time to answer individual questions via email, I'd be highly skeptical of my ability to do well in an online course. I'm the student that needs the classroom environment with lecture, questions, discussions, etc...

I did just think of another field, Advertising, that might be worth my researching but figured I'd ask here too. It's "practical" at least in theory, and does require a certain amount of creativity.