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purple skates
12-28-2010, 08:45 PM
And you misspelled "recipient". And some would argue that it is not appropriate to use the ampersand when attempting to be formal (as you argue we all should at all times). Then there is the controversy of the Oxford comma...

People make typographical errors all the time. Or maybe some people don't spell well. Or maybe the person posting isn't a native speaker of the language being used. Or whatever.

I have a real pet peeve with people pointing out spelling and grammar errors on internet forums. People who point them out are usually doing so because either their own argument is weak or they are just being ornery. Either way, it adds nothing to the conversation, IMO.

LordCirque
12-28-2010, 09:12 PM
i didet no their were rulez for grammer and speling n that there punciasion

I'm extremely aware of formal writing rules, and by the way, the use of the & instead of and is informal. I'm actually praised quite often for my knowledge of spelling, grammar, and punctuation by college English professors, plus I regularly get perfect scores in the areas of grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

My perfect 4.0 in College English/Writing classes says something to that as well.

Do I always watch that when I post online? No, and I know VERY few people that do, including people that know better.

PDilemma
12-28-2010, 09:27 PM
People make typographical errors all the time. Or maybe some people don't spell well. Or maybe the person posting isn't a native speaker of the language being used. Or whatever.

I have a real pet peeve with people pointing out spelling and grammar errors on internet forums. People who point them out are usually doing so because either their own argument is weak or they are just being ornery. Either way, it adds nothing to the conversation, IMO.

I was told off --in the very post I critiqued-- for suggesting that people don't always need to have perfect grammar, punctuation and spelling in informal communication such as on an internet forum. I found it a bit ironic.

Nan
12-28-2010, 09:32 PM
I found it a bit ironic.

It's like rain on your wedding day
It's a free ride when you've already paid
It's the good advice that you just didn't take....

;)

purple skates
12-28-2010, 09:37 PM
I love that song....

taf2002
12-28-2010, 09:48 PM
Except that punctuation and grammatical usage is not without controversy. The assumption you make is that the rules are constant and set in stone. Serious students of grammar and linguistics would tell you quickly that they are not at all.

And you misspelled "recipient". And some would argue that it is not appropriate to use the ampersand when attempting to be formal (as you argue we all should at all times). Then there is the controversy of the Oxford comma...

I don't assume that grammar rules are constant, but the rules I follow are constant. IOW I try to follow what I learned whether in an informal setting or not. I've been out of college for a long time so I haven't learned anything new. But I had a double major in English & Speech with a minor in secondary education so I try to practice what I preach. Choppette's post is a good reason to do so.

I wasn't attempting to be formal, I was attempting to be correct but yes, I do take shortcuts such as ampersands and contractions. I don't think they lead to misunderstandings. And I knew that "recipient" was misspelled but after changing it several times I gave up. For some reason I can't access spellcheck when on FSU. I should have put "(sp)" after it.

Anita18
12-28-2010, 10:23 PM
I have a real pet peeve with people pointing out spelling and grammar errors on internet forums. People who point them out are usually doing so because either their own argument is weak or they are just being ornery. Either way, it adds nothing to the conversation, IMO.
Agreed.

I find that most people here watch their spelling and grammar, so any non-native English speaker could learn a lot from reading this forum. However, as it is with most Internet forums, the style is more colloquial than formal.

Tinami Amori
12-29-2010, 03:27 AM
And I could always double major or minor in English/Writing/Literature/Dance whatever else. I'd always planned on a Double Major anyway.

Oh, how fun.... to Dance, to Write, to go on Architectural digs.... La-di-dah..:summer:

Your poor mother.......:o, now i'm certain she'll have to live off her pension and not much more when she's old and not counting on your contributions, and you'd probably be raiding her refrigerator....:slinkaway


Aesop: Ant and Grasshopper
http://www.umass.edu/aesop/content.php?n=0&i=1

Prancer
12-29-2010, 03:42 AM
Damn, I can't wait to have the hindsight perspective a lot of you have.

That's one thing about getting old--you don't have to do anything to make it happen :lol:.


Not to be mean, but this has been bugging me for quite a while. You will flunk any writing course if you insist on capitalizing whatever words you feel like. There are actually rules for capitalization just as there are for punctuation and spelling, and if you don't know them you will be summarily bounced from a successful degree program in writing.

:shuffle: IME, English professors care less about such things than just about anyone else and creative writing professors care less than anyone.

This is not to say that conventions don't matter, just that I don't know of any English professor who would fail a student for a spelling error. When I was in a professional writing program and everything had to be publication-ready, yes, but in general writing classes? No.


Even the library at my school - which is a library that is purely electronic and does not exist in "real life" - has actual reference librarians working at it, full time.

Reference librarians are, as a group, the most internet savyy, technologically literate people I know. I follow seven or eight of them on Twitter in an attempt to keep up.

The more complex information gets, the more need there will be for librarians, IMO--but the market there isn't all that great right now.


I find that most people here watch their spelling and grammar, so any non-native English speaker could learn a lot from reading this forum.

FSU is the most literate general board I know of :cheer2:. But it's still a good idea to keep McKean's Law in mind: Any correction of the speech or writing of others will contain at least one grammatical, spelling, or typographical error. :D

purple skates
12-29-2010, 03:47 AM
IME, English professors care less about such things than just about anyone else and creative writing professors care less than anyone.

My brain keeps telling me that Prancer made the dreaded "could care less/couldn't care less" mistake but damn - the above is correct and it's a case of the mind seeing what it wants to see. I was all ready to jump up and down and break my own thou shall not correct commandment. :blah:

:P

Prancer
12-29-2010, 03:48 AM
My brain keeps telling me that Prancer made the dreaded "could care less/couldn't care less" mistake but damn - the above is correct and it's a case of the mind seeing what it wants to see. I was all ready to jump up and down and break my own thou shall not correct commandment. :blah:

:P

Nyah, nyah :P.

Anita18
12-29-2010, 03:51 AM
Oh, how fun.... to Dance, to Write, to go on Architectural digs.... La-di-dah..:summer:

Your poor mother.......:o, now i'm certain she'll have to live off her pension and not much more when she's old and not counting on your contributions, and you'd probably be raiding her refrigerator....:slinkaway

Aesop: Ant and Grasshopper
http://www.umass.edu/aesop/content.php?n=0&i=1
Not too long ago people with the ant mentality went into law school thinking they'd come out making guaranteed 6-figure salaries. Now those people are 5-figures in the hole wondering how the heck they got there and what to do with skills (and degrees) that aren't the least in demand. :shuffle:

In this uncertain economy, you might as well do something you like instead of chasing after something "lucrative." :P

Allen
12-29-2010, 03:51 AM
:shuffle: IME, English professors care less about such things than just about anyone else and creative writing professors care less than anyone.


I think you're probably right about that. In my experience, you have to mark the grammar, but you're really grading the content unless the grammar is just atrocious.

LordCirque
12-29-2010, 04:07 AM
I know quite a few people in a field that was thought to be very safe, architecture, that are all unemployed and looking for new careers even.

With the uncertainty of the economy, I don't think there are ANY careers that are "safe."

Louis
12-29-2010, 04:36 AM
Combining a liberal arts major with a more practical major or minor will set you up beautifully for a career.

Once you have the second major or the graduate degree completed, your liberal arts degree becomes an enormous asset. But until then, you'll be a diamond-in-the-rough. Some will take a chance on you; some won't.

Signed,
B.A. in Literary Theory, M.B.A. in Marketing.