PDA

View Full Version : Comparative Literature Major



Pages : 1 2 3 [4] 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

jp1andonly
12-27-2010, 02:55 PM
so i studied music in university. My parents almost had a fit wondering what I"d do with it. I always wanted to be a highschool music teacher. I finished, got into my b.Ed program teaching highschool music and lo and behold today I don't teach it! After 2 years I decided that it wasnt for me and got a degree in another field: special education. This is what I do now. I only use my music degree when the music teacher needs help with a performance. I havent played my flute in ooooooo 8 years and thats ok. I still love to listen to classical music but will never be at the level I was before. I have found more interests to keep me busy and help me enjoy life. I am again back in school getting my masters in educational leadership as I want to be a principal. No one would have guessed that one as I was not one for mounds of paperwork and solving problems until I got into teaching.

If I had only thought I would teach music for the rest of my life I probably would have missed out on all the valuable experiences and people I have met over the years.

Really, my music background got my foot in the door and for that I'm grateful. Being a dual specialist makes me desireable to the district though I know I will never teach music again. Doing music in university almost drove the love of it right outa me. Sometimes doing the things you love in a higher educational setting is not always the right thing

Rob
12-27-2010, 06:49 PM
There is a whole lot of middle ground between a job you love and a job you hate, and you won't know how you feel about a job until you do it for a few years. The most interesting job in the world will get boring once you master it.

Word. And a job that you don't love can be interesting and rewarding even though it wouldn't be your first choice.

For example, my field changes every 2-4 years - a major law is passed that is incredibly complex and changes everything. Like Deferred compensation rules, Pension Protection Act, Health Care Reform. Even though I would rather be a ballet master or critic (too old to be dancing now) or teaching mythology, it is rewarding enough to dig in and figure out how to make things work in the new regime. People respect me at work because it is difficult material. I don't love it, but it is satisfying and interesting enough, especially when combined with a regular paycheck and benefits that allow me to buy ballet tickets, travel to skating competitions, maintain a home near the beach, and hopefully, retire in 10 years. The downside is that I spend a LOT of time working, but who doesn't? At 26, I would have been :yawn: at this idea, but at 50, it was a darn good thing I got the degree and went into this particular field because it is not glutted.

LordCirque
12-27-2010, 08:44 PM
While researching University programs that have Board Certified Forensic Anthropologists on staff, I came across a single major Dual program at UC Santa Cruz combining Earth Science and Anthropology for those interested in going into the lab work side of Paleo Anthropology. It sounds like it's a reasonably practical degree and if I can get through the math/science aspect of it (requires a 3 semester Calc based Physics sequence), could be practical because I'd think the training in that program/degree would probably qualify me to work in non-Anthropology/archaeology labs as well, which could sustain me if I decided I wanted to pursue Anthropology further itself and go to grad school, or just stay in the lab. It's all hypothetical obviously, as I'm not confident I'd be able to get through all the math and science, but I might at least give some of the classes a try before I rule the possibility out.

And I could always double major or minor in English/Writing/Literature/Dance whatever else. I'd always planned on a Double Major anyway.

Anita18
12-27-2010, 09:46 PM
I've actually thought of taking a CSIS class, just to see what it's like, and that is a very growing and in demand industry right now. The course you mentioned actually sounds like it'd be a lot of fun. I'm not much into web and graphic design, I'm not great at drawing, even on the computer, at all.
I've heard the ongoing joke that graphic designers don't know how to draw. :lol: That's for the illustration majors, duh. :P

Web design/programming isn't very hard to do by itself, but to do it well takes a lot of thought, patience, and some talent. I picked it up myself very quickly, but both of my parents are programmers so maybe it's in my genes. :lol:


I would like to have a job I love. My career is basically going to be my life. I don't have an extremely active social life, nor do I plan on having a family outside of a boyfriend/husband, so I'll have my relationship and my career. I don't want my job to make me hate my life, since that is largely going to be my life. It may not be a practical view but it is how I view my future. I don't disagree with you that I need a Plan B, but I need to find something I am going to enjoy doing.
Well, I don't think you should compartmentalize your life like that. There are a ton of things out there for me to try/learn that have nothing to do with having a job or a social life.

I have NO social life aside from hanging out with my bf (and seeing my family every once in a while), but I manage to fill my time reading about various issues, learning how to knit, and dabbling in art/graphic design. All of those are completely unrelated to my job, which I like but don't love. But honestly, I still wouldn't trade out my job yet, because despite it not being in something I love, I DO love the people I work with, and wouldn't want to give that up unless I knew I had something really awesome waiting in the wings.

Your dream career could be ruined by your work culture and coworkers. I totally lucked out on this, and I don't take it for granted at all.

Rhianna
12-27-2010, 10:56 PM
You know, when I started at community college I had so many plans of classes to take and see what I thought. I knew what my major would be and before I knew it, I'm graduating with my AA after next term and I've taken hardly any of them. Everything was filled with general education requirements plus a few classes for my major and minor, plus foreign language requirements.

overedge
12-28-2010, 03:37 AM
While researching University programs that have Board Certified Forensic Anthropologists on staff, I came across a single major Dual program at UC Santa Cruz combining Earth Science and Anthropology for those interested in going into the lab work side of Paleo Anthropology. It sounds like it's a reasonably practical degree and if I can get through the math/science aspect of it (requires a 3 semester Calc based Physics sequence), could be practical because I'd think the training in that program/degree would probably qualify me to work in non-Anthropology/archaeology labs as well, which could sustain me if I decided I wanted to pursue Anthropology further itself and go to grad school, or just stay in the lab. It's all hypothetical obviously, as I'm not confident I'd be able to get through all the math and science, but I might at least give some of the classes a try before I rule the possibility out.

And I could always double major or minor in English/Writing/Literature/Dance whatever else. I'd always planned on a Double Major anyway.

Speaking as someone who did a double major in two completely unrelated fields....doing this probably means a couple of extra semesters of study and/or extra expense. Or more than a couple depending on what subjects you choose. I can guarantee that you will have trouble getting required classes when you need them, because the two areas are not going to schedule their classes to mesh with each other - and if you can't take a required class in one area that is a prerequisite for other required classes, you basically have to wait until that required class is offered again. Which puts you even further behind in finishing.

And no, going to the advisors or assistants in one area and asking for accommodation because you are majoring in something else is not going to get you any special consideration. And instructors in one area are not going to cut you slack if you have something major due in your other area. There will be times that you have to work your *ss off to juggle the demands of courses in two different areas.

I did a double major because I happened across two subjects that really turned my crank and that I wanted to learn a LOT more about. So I was willing to put up with the inconvenience, the extra cost, and the extra time. I would NOT recommend doing a double major just for the sake of doing a double major, especially in subjects that aren't related.

numbers123
12-28-2010, 04:20 AM
as someone whose career was everything - to a fault, I can tell you that it really doesn't matter how passionate you are or dedicated to the career if you don't balance career with something else in life. Do not expect that your career will be your life.

I thought I was dedicating myself to a career that would fulfill me always. I found that I missed out on some very important things. Because there is no career or company that will pay you back as friends and family will. And there is no option to turn the clock back and grab those important times/memories.

It takes time to commit to a career path focus. You will find things that interest you, but unless you have a job while you persue those interests, you will find yourself with a mountain of debt and still no career path.

Quintuple
12-28-2010, 06:51 AM
Damn, I can't wait to have the hindsight perspective a lot of you have.

At the Christmas dinner table, I almost broke down and said out loud, "I don't have a career path. What the hell am I doing?" Specifically thinking of this thread, that is.

I still have the shortlist of all the crazy jobs I want to do (which require experience, portfolio, connections, and luck), and really haven't pursued a single one.

So I'm reading this thread as it progresses with curiosity, because I was where LC is a few years ago, and have a job that any neurotically analytical monkey could do, and haven't yet found the balance to develop my other interests.

Good luck!

flyingsit
12-28-2010, 02:50 PM
And I could always double major or minor in English/Writing/Literature/Dance whatever else. I'd always planned on a Double Major anyway.

Not to be mean, but this has been bugging me for quite a while. You will flunk any writing course if you insist on capitalizing whatever words you feel like. There are actually rules for capitalization just as there are for punctuation and spelling, and if you don't know them you will be summarily bounced from a successful degree program in writing.

GarrAarghHrumph
12-28-2010, 03:57 PM
That's not a bad idea actually and one I hadn't actually thought about really but does make logical sense. My only worry about that is what future will libraries play in our society 10, 20, 30 years from now? I don't think they will ever become irrelevant but one has to wonder.

@Prancer, yeah, I agree that no matter what I do, I'm going to have things I don't like about it. I just hope to find something that even the things I don't like, don't make me want to slit my wrists at the end of the day.

Even the library at my school - which is a library that is purely electronic and does not exist in "real life" - has actual reference librarians working at it, full time. I think that as in many fields, the library science/information science field is changing; but if you make sure you have the skills needed by a modern librarian, you'd be in the best possible shape to actually get a job in that field when you graduate. In addition, there are also specialty librarians who are in demand - law, science and engineering, etc. - all of whom have special skills for those fields. You may want to talk to some people who are in the field, see what you think.

PDilemma
12-28-2010, 04:02 PM
Not to be mean, but this has been bugging me for quite a while. You will flunk any writing course if you insist on capitalizing whatever words you feel like. There are actually rules for capitalization just as there are for punctuation and spelling, and if you don't know them you will be summarily bounced from a successful degree program in writing.

When I post online, my punctuation is often a nightmare. In emails to friends, I abuse commas at a rate that should land me in a grammar jail.

When I write a paper for grad school, I check, recheck, revise and edit to make sure I do not make those errors. Likewise, when I write email or other materials for work.

I would never judge someone's writing ability based on how they post on an internet forum.

taf2002
12-28-2010, 07:06 PM
When I post online, my punctuation is often a nightmare. In emails to friends, I abuse commas at a rate that should land me in a grammar jail.

When I write a paper for grad school, I check, recheck, revise and edit to make sure I do not make those errors. Likewise, when I write email or other materials for work.

I would never judge someone's writing ability based on how they post on an internet forum.

When I post on an internet forum I proofread for grammar & edit for better understanding. People who don't get misunderstood all the time. And not doing so can lead to errors on something really important. Using correct grammar, punctuation, & spelling should be a habit that should not be dropped when the receipient isn't important.

flyingsit
12-28-2010, 07:22 PM
I majored in journalism. At my university, to get into the journalism department, a grammar/spelling/punctuation test was required, and the minimum passing score was 80%. The first journalism class you took required in-class writing assignments every week, and if you turned in an article with a spelling error you failed the assignment, but if you asked the professor for the proper spelling of anything, he would give the correct spelling without penalty. That class really opened a lot of people's eyes to the fact that spellcheck is not a substitute for learning to spell properly. (their/there, your/you're, many other examples)

PDilemma
12-28-2010, 07:58 PM
When I post on an internet forum I proofread for grammar & edit for better understanding. People who don't get misunderstood all the time. And not doing so can lead to errors on something really important. Using correct grammar, punctuation, & spelling should be a habit that should not be dropped when the receipient isn't important.

Except that punctuation and grammatical usage is not without controversy. The assumption you make is that the rules are constant and set in stone. Serious students of grammar and linguistics would tell you quickly that they are not at all.

And you misspelled "recipient". And some would argue that it is not appropriate to use the ampersand when attempting to be formal (as you argue we all should at all times). Then there is the controversy of the Oxford comma...

Choupette
12-28-2010, 08:40 PM
I just had to say it: I don't have any good advice to Lord Cirque, but this thread just made me want to go back studying! :lol: I will not change career path, but I'm very tempted to study part-time. I'm fortunate that studying here doesn't cost as much as in the US.

Also, as someone for whom English is not a first language, I'm thankful to those who do their best when writing English because I'm always at risk of assimilating everything, mistakes included! :lol: