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Marlowe
12-20-2010, 06:46 AM
Getting older doesn't mean one has to become an old crank.

I practice Chi Kung and Tai Chi, and I and my many friends and classmates (of all ages above and below 60) are all getting happier... not crankier!

Anita18
12-20-2010, 10:33 AM
My mother always says that as you get older you've got your same personality - only more so. The happy people seem to get even happier, and the grumpy ones tend to get grumpier.
I can definitely see this in my mom. Now that us kids are grown and taking care of ourselves, she's happy to chirp, "It's your life, do whatever you want!" rather than yelling at us to study. :lol: She's so much more happy-go-lucky than she was before, even though she's gone through a bunch of health issues.

Even my dad has chilled out a bit, although he'll still give you a long lecture if you ask a simple question. :lol:

paskatefan
12-20-2010, 10:40 AM
This is a very wise messsage. But for me, I think at age 61, I'm just pissed off that I don't have another 70 years to enjoy life! Seriously, I'm not grumpy at all. In fact, I feel lighter and happier in some respects and heavier in others. I don't have to work so hard, but I don't have many of the wonderful things of younger life to re-live, like young children and youthful emotions. But then again, I have two gorgeous grandchildren that I can enjoy and love but don't have to worry about raising. There is such encouragement in the idea that you have "time" when you are younger. Now I don't have as much, but I am also so grateful for the life I have had and can still reasonably expect good days to come. Heck-good decades!

When you hit your 50's....your parents or other older relatives and friends begin to pass away or suffer....and yet you are still strong and healthy but you realize there is nothing you can do to save your loved ones from dying, no matter how strong you are or how much money you have. It's like a wake-up call of reality. Maybe one is not invincible or omniscient or have all the answers. I think anyone can experience this at any age, but the mid-50's seems to be a common time. One begins to see the finish line and know that there is still time, but we must use it wisely!

Perhaps a sense of impatience with those who "have all the time in the world" plays a part. It's like I want to shake the shoulders of the young and say "Don't take this for granted!" But yet I love youth and love young people and their spirit and energy so much. Each era is a treasure. I do not like older people who shake fingers and admonish young people. I do not like older people who think they "know it all." Some might know more-some might not depending on how they've lived their lives.

Here's to life. Joie de vivre!

I need to take this approach to life (and remind my husband about it). :D

Cyn
12-20-2010, 11:00 AM
I forget who said this first, but the quote is something like this:


As one gets older, their broad mind trades places with their narrow waist.

Schmeck
12-20-2010, 11:30 AM
My mom, who just lost my dad a few months ago, has definitely gotten grumpier - but we call it depression, and she sees a doctor (and takes meds) for it.

Auntie
12-20-2010, 11:42 AM
My Dad was always grumpy and tense while we were growing up. Now he is positively happy go lucky. :confused: I think it's because he doesn't have to worry about his job any more. My Mom on the other hand ... last Christmas eve while driving home from church she complained vehemently when we got stuck behind a long line of traffic. It was firemen and a firetruck with Santa delivering presents to poor neighborhoods. Now that's grumpy!

The million dollar question is how do you avoid becoming a grumpy old person?

paskatefan
12-20-2010, 12:08 PM
The million dollar question is how do you avoid becoming a grumpy old person?

Well, for starters, keep yourself productively busy, and try to associate yourself with people who have an upbeat outlook on life.

snoopy
12-20-2010, 01:50 PM
I think grumpiness in older people can be related to health and/or slower reflexes (like 70+ older). Things just take longer to do then they used to. Say…. something like reading the signs while driving. If you haven’t had any sensory decline, you take that kind of thing for granted. Some people can laugh about their declining speed and memory but I think others get agitated over it.

Aceon6
12-20-2010, 01:59 PM
I'm definitely more grumpy. My health is fine. I don't have any physical limitations. I just don't feel the need to smile sweetly when someone stomps on me, and have lost patience with folks who never learned common courtesy. The nice part about being grumpy is that I can get pi$$ed off for a second, get over it, and go on to have a decent day.

Holley Calmes
12-20-2010, 02:04 PM
You know, I've never met you, but this quality about you comes across so well in your other posts. And until a post I read I think yesterday, I thought you were actually decades younger :D

Hey-60 is the new 40! :lol:

floskate
12-20-2010, 02:09 PM
My theory is with each passing decade your bullshit radar improves that you have less and less tolerance for crap.

So you appear grumpier and I guess you are grumpier but it's because you've seen it all so many times before that you won't bother wasting a second more of your time on the same old same old because you really weren't born yesterday :D

I totally agree with this!! It's so true. Both Mr Flo and I rant on a daily basis about the various incompetences we come across, often laughing at ourselves for the grumpiness we come out with. I have to say that at times we resemble Waldorf and Statler and really, we're still quite young. :lol:

That said, I always feel better afterwards once I've had a grumpy old moan. But for sure I will be one cantankerous old bitch someday. The writing's on the wall already! :shuffle:

let`s talk
12-20-2010, 02:33 PM
Do people's levels of intolerance get higher as they get older?
I noticed that the older generation is ruled by one simple axiom: those who don't lecture younger strangers how to behave are the smartest. Works offline and online.

Ozzisk8tr
12-20-2010, 02:42 PM
I noticed that the older generation is ruled by one simple axiom: those who don't lecture younger strangers how to behave are the smartest. Works offline and online.

Then again there's always the one about the younger generation should be seen and not heard. Works online really well.

Bev Johnston
12-20-2010, 04:16 PM
Getting older doesn't mean one has to become an old crank.

I practice Chi Kung and Tai Chi, and I and my many friends and classmates (of all ages above and below 60) are all getting happier... not crankier!

I wonder if maintaining some sort of physical activity helps. I know I feel better after a good skate (or even a bad one) or a class at the Y. I think it's getting those endorphin levels up, plus the social aspect involved with being out and about with others. I notice that I get cranky and down when I spend a lot of time on my own, in my house. And I've always been that way.

My grandmother got horribly cranky as she got older. Her world just became smaller and smaller and the only thing she saw was what was presented to her on tv. I think some sort of social life would've helped immensley.

merrywidow
12-20-2010, 05:54 PM
I'm 75 & I agree with some of what has been written. However, I don't think I'm grumpier but I do complain more about my deteriorating health, politics & not being able to do as much in a day as I used to do. There is a well known health product (advertised on TV) that I had the misfortune to take for a month after a heart attack & it definitely alters your personality. The very first day I quit taking it I was back to being upbeat instead of hating the world. I've spoken to others who have been on this product (or their spouses) & they've experienced the same personality change. So you may want to check out the meds your old people are on. I may be slowing down physically but I think I'm almost as sharp mentally as I was.