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View Full Version : Yuna will skate to Giselle and 'Arirang'



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Shinku
12-04-2010, 03:29 PM
Not that Yuna would really care, but the reason her media exposure went down in Japan, if it really happened, would has to do more with demise of Asada.

Since 2006 Jr Worlds, Japanese media used Yuna to build a phony rivary story vis a vie Asada in order to make money. Since 2009 Worlds, it has become clear even to an untrained eye that Yuna's skating is miles away better than Asada's. Now a days, trying to compare them would only result in embarassment for Asada, hence they are keeping it quite.

I think you got it wrong. They simply haven't been writing about Yuna recently because she hasn't been competing so far this season and there's been no scandalous news after she split with Orser. The Japanese media in general, isn't that sweet on Mao nor any athlete to care not to embarrass them. Which is quite different from how the Korean media treats Yuna.

But surprisingly, the Japanese media has been pretty supportive towards Mao this season. There's been hardly any criticizm on her bad results, but articles focus more on the fact that she's been reforming jumps so her conditions right now are unavoidable. As a result, her fans in Japan aren't that bothered about how she's been doing recently, and Mao hasn't even lost a single sponsor.

And frankly speaking, most Japanese are getting sick of this 'Korean Boom' thing which their media purposely created a few years ago for commercial reasons, so more and more are losing interest in anything Korean, which includes Yuna. Articles on Yuna do not sell, and clips of Yuna simply do not get good ratings anymore...hence, not much news about Yuna thesedays in Japan. Only translated Korean articles are feeding Yuna news in Japan.:smokin:

Lookingood
12-04-2010, 04:37 PM
Sick of this..:blah:

Is there any clips of Yuna practice videos about the new Program?

kwanfan1818
12-04-2010, 05:12 PM
Wow my first time to leave a comment here and can't get to know whats going on here. First Yuna's Program is 'Homage to Korea' exactly, not only Arirang but with several Korean trd'l songs isn't it? I've never seen this kind of BIG argument on a skater's program or music, only when she said just the titles- and whats wrong? Why can't JUST wait for the WC expecting another beauty she would show us? OMG.

You obviously haven't been around this board very much.

dinakt
12-04-2010, 11:32 PM
Wow my first time to leave a comment here and can't get to know whats going on here. First Yuna's Program is 'Homage to Korea' exactly, not only Arirang but with several Korean trd'l songs isn't it? I've never seen this kind of BIG argument on a skater's program or music, only when she said just the titles- and whats wrong? Why can't JUST wait for the WC expecting another beauty she would show us? OMG.
hmm anyway i've learned much more about Arirang and the relationship of two countries. and I still think theres no problem with her choice. why can't? she's apparently one of the greatest skater ever, and olympic champ. she can do what she want. i'm on her.

But you have to agree, some parts of the argument were actually interesting! The parts that involved reasoning, history and video, from many posters who do not agree with each other?
It is true that Yu-Na threads provoke passions; same is true for other successful and brilliant skaters.
I wish Yu-na supporters who are new to the boards would feel a little less outrage at discussions surrounding Yu-Na and would be a little more willing to carry on a dispute without name - calling and eye- rolling. There are fans like that, and they have provided some great, valuable information. There would be no skating boards if we all were " JUST waiting" to see what our favorite- and not so favorite- skaters would do.

PUNKPRINCESS
12-05-2010, 12:09 AM
But you have to agree, some parts of the argument were actually interesting! The parts that involved reasoning, history and video, from many posters who do not agree with each other?
It is true that Yu-Na threads provoke passions; same is true for other successful and brilliant skaters.
There are many divergent views that have been expressed in this thread regarding the place of ballet in skating, the ways in which music can be used (ballet music or not), historical and nationalistic relevance of folk songs, etc. All in all, I'd say this was one of the better threads you'd normally see.

:respec:

I also wish people wouldn't be called "bots" as liberally as I see it happening. I was PMed by one of the Yu-Na fans thanking me for my posts because she herself is afraid to voice her opinions. Not to mention a number of posters getting personal with me. :rolleyes: My feelings toward ballet in figure skating stand, and it's not only relevant to Yu-Na but also in defence of Yukari's Giselle. Apparently, that makes me an uber too.

RumbleFish
12-05-2010, 01:18 AM
I think you got it wrong. They simply haven't been writing about Yuna recently because she hasn't been competing so far this season and there's been no scandalous news after she split with Orser. The Japanese media in general, isn't that sweet on Mao nor any athlete to care not to embarrass them. Which is quite different from how the Korean media treats Yuna.

But surprisingly, the Japanese media has been pretty supportive towards Mao this season. There's been hardly any criticizm on her bad results, but articles focus more on the fact that she's been reforming jumps so her conditions right now are unavoidable. As a result, her fans in Japan aren't that bothered about how she's been doing recently, and Mao hasn't even lost a single sponsor.

And frankly speaking, most Japanese are getting sick of this 'Korean Boom' thing which their media purposely created a few years ago for commercial reasons, so more and more are losing interest in anything Korean, which includes Yuna. Articles on Yuna do not sell, and clips of Yuna simply do not get good ratings anymore...hence, not much news about Yuna thesedays in Japan. Only translated Korean articles are feeding Yuna news in Japan.:smokin:

You don't get my point, do you?
I don't speak for all Yuna fans, but for me at least, don't really give a shit whether Japanese media exposes Yuna or not. In fact, I'd prefer them staying away from her as far as possible, as I have seen in the past how they used her to create the Asada delusion or fabricate false images about her.

The bottom line is that regardless of what you may think, Japanese shouldn’t' be treated in any different way from fans in other region. If you enjoy Yuna's skating, come and join the party. If you don't, shut up and stay the feck away. That's all I have to say.

let`s talk
12-05-2010, 02:41 AM
On Yuna's forum her fans posted drawings of her in various costumes of Giselle (the thread with practically the same titile as this one). Very pretty indeed, and natural! I vote for the first costume, a traditional one, she looks very colorful and more attractive. I wonder what her real costume will be.:P

Tinami Amori
12-05-2010, 03:00 AM
Wow. I've never thought Arirang could be seen as a political tune. :lol:
The song itself is very peaceful, more about 'missing a loved one', which can be a lover, family, a motherland, good ol'time, etc.

Look guys….. Just because you were not aware of something, or would rather act “utopian” and intentionally avoid controversial subjects, or feel that something is too un-PC to mention, does not mean “it” does not exist….. There is an issue of “nationalism” associated with Arirang, and it has connection to historic events related to Japan.

Weather or not it means Kim should or should not skate to this piece when performing in Tokyo, is ANOTHER subject.

100,000 North Koreans dazzle at mass games spectaclehttp://worldfocus.org/blog/2009/10/06/100000-north-koreans-dazzle-at-mass-games-spectacle/

The “Arirang” song is the most well-known folk song from Korean history. It’s the unofficial national anthem for both Koreas. But when [North Koreans] use that name, they’re demonstrating that it’s not just a North Korean song - that it’s an all-Korean song demonstrating the unity of the Korean people. It originally became an emblem of nationalism during Japanese colonial rule from 1910 to 1945. The very first Korean movie from 1927 was called “Arirang.” This is mass, modernized folk culture.

The Dual Career of “Arirang”: The Korean Resistance Anthem That Became a Japanese Pop Hit
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=1264852

“Arirang” is known worldwide as the quintessential Korean folk song. Its iconic status in contemporary Korea derives from its perceived role in strengthening Korean resolve to resist the cultural violence of the Japanese colonial occupation (1905–45). A musical “skeleton” capable of countless improvised variations and interpretations, some “Arirangs” explicitly assailed the Japanese and thus were censored by colonial authorities. However, in the 1930s and 1940s, precisely the time when assimilationist pressures in colonial Korea were intensifying, Japanese songsmiths, singers, and recording companies released “Arirang” renditions in prodigious quantities, sometimes in collaboration with Korean performers. “Arirang” became the most familiar song in the Japanese empire: Its persistent theme of loss spoke to Koreans of their lost sovereignty and to Japanese of the ravaging effects of modernity on traditional lifeways. For both peoples, it served as a mirror for self-contemplation and an “ethnographic lens” for gazing upon the other.

Korean Kamikaze
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/opinon/2010/12/165_73079.html


So, one should not be surprised to learn that Corporal Matsui was followed by a number of other Koreans. Those people, usually in the early 20s, grew up under the influence of imperial propaganda and came to perceive themselves as Japanese subjects, first and foremost.

So, they wanted to die for their emperor. Nonetheless, they still saw themselves as Korean. In a telling sign, Tak Kyong-hyon, who died in a suicide attack in late May 1945, sang Arirang while boarding his fateful plane.

Taking into consideration historic facts NEVER hurts when doing business, travelling or performing in foreign countries.

dinakt
12-05-2010, 03:53 AM
Tinami, maybe sometime a Georgian skater skates to "Suliko", and the new generations will not take it as any sort of statement, but only as a beautiful song. Generations change, old associations die out... It is only sensitive material while there are people who have negative associations. Perhaps it was inflammatory in 1940, but is not anymore. It seems the majority of people posting here does not feel "Arirang" is political these days, though the opinion varies. How oh how to take a poll in Japan... The issue, after all, isn't how Koreans feel about the song ( clearly it is loved), but whether the Japanese audience would have negative associations.

invierno
12-05-2010, 04:16 AM
.

100,000 North Koreans dazzle at mass games spectaclehttp://worldfocus.org/blog/2009/10/06/100000-north-koreans-dazzle-at-mass-games-spectacle/


The Dual Career of “Arirang”: The Korean Resistance Anthem That Became a Japanese Pop Hit
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=1264852

Korean Kamikaze
http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/opinon/2010/12/165_73079.html




Why do you even bring North Korea here? Yuna is from South Korea. Jee.
And your articles say about Arirang's meaning and role in 20's, 30's, and 40's. Now it is almost 2011.
Yeah, I got it that you did your homework and you dug some history.
Now MOVE ON. :rolleyes: You sound like a broken record.

ETA: Why didn't you say anything when Zaretsky siblings used Schindler's list? Or Lambiel's William Tell? It could hurt Austrians' or Germans' feeling so bad!! If I dig up more, I'm pretty sure there must have been much more of nationalistic music used in FS. Do they use them to attack certain other ethnic group?? NO! They use it because they are proud of THEIR heritage, their country, their musician, etc. And you are gonna say Koreans should't use the most Korean music? Because it was used agaist Japan for couple of decades, more than 60 years ago, during its 2000 years existance?? For what, for Japanese???? WTF?? Are you even Japanese? Are you representing Japanese consensus here?

From your past posts, I know you don't really care for Yuna. It's okay.
But here you are trying to twist Yuna's intension, 'sending a love letter for her fans' into some non-existing political mess. Stop that.

Le Amarant
12-05-2010, 04:25 AM
^I think you forgot to read the rest of the quote:


It’s the unofficial national anthem for both Koreas. But when [North Koreans] use that name, they’re demonstrating that it’s not just a North Korean song - that it’s an all-Korean song demonstrating the unity of the Korean people. It originally became an emblem of nationalism during Japanese colonial rule from 1910 to 1945. The very first Korean movie from 1927 was called “Arirang.” This is mass, modernized folk culture.

triple_toe
12-05-2010, 05:10 AM
So, from Le Amarant's post, Arirang is basically like the Hockey Night in Canada theme for Canadians, right?:inavoid:

RunnersHigh
12-05-2010, 05:32 AM
The “Arirang” song is the most well-known folk song from Korean history. It’s the unofficial national anthem for both Koreas. But when [North Koreans] use that name, they’re demonstrating that it’s not just a North Korean song - that it’s an all-Korean song demonstrating the unity of the Korean people. It originally became an emblem of nationalism during Japanese colonial rule from 1910 to 1945. The very first Korean movie from 1927 was called “Arirang.” This is mass, modernized folk culture.
There're two DIFFERENT Koreas since after 1950 like there were two DIFFERENT Germans. And Yu-Na was born in South Korea.


Look guys….. Just because you were not aware of something, or would rather act “utopian” and intentionally avoid controversial subjects, or feel that something is too un-PC to mention, does not mean “it” does not exist….. There is an issue of “nationalism” associated with Arirang, and it has connection to historic events related to Japan.

Weather or not it means Kim should or should not skate to this piece when performing in Tokyo, is ANOTHER subject.
Arirang clearly had an issue of nationalism about 1930 or 1940.
Korean flag clearly had an issue of nationalism since 1910.
Korean anthem clearly had an issue of nationalism since 1910.
Even Korean clearly had an issue of nationalism since 1910.

Every Korean thing and living things is controversial to you? :lol:
What about Kimchi in Tokyo or Galaxy S in Tokyo?


“Arirang” is known worldwide as the quintessential Korean folk song. Its iconic status in contemporary Korea derives from its perceived role in strengthening Korean resolve to resist the cultural violence of the Japanese colonial occupation (1905–45). A musical “skeleton” capable of countless improvised variations and interpretations, some “Arirangs” explicitly assailed the Japanese and thus were censored by colonial authorities. However, in the 1930s and 1940s, precisely the time when assimilationist pressures in colonial Korea were intensifying, Japanese songsmiths, singers, and recording companies released “Arirang” renditions in prodigious quantities, sometimes in collaboration with Korean performers. “Arirang” became the most familiar song in the Japanese empire: Its persistent theme of loss spoke to Koreans of their lost sovereignty and to Japanese of the ravaging effects of modernity on traditional lifeways. For both peoples, it served as a mirror for self-contemplation and an “ethnographic lens” for gazing upon the other.

If you want to make your definition clear above, you need to tell me what the title or lyrics of each Arirnag above. I bet you already knew there're a lot Arirangs and countless improvised variations. Hope you can solve any of them. ;)


So, one should not be surprised to learn that Corporal Matsui was followed by a number of other Koreans. Those people, usually in the early 20s, grew up under the influence of imperial propaganda and came to perceive themselves as Japanese subjects, first and foremost.

So, they wanted to die for their emperor. Nonetheless, they still saw themselves as Korean. In a telling sign, Tak Kyong-hyon, who died in a suicide attack in late May 1945, sang Arirang while boarding his fateful plane.
:confused: What is your point above? You mean the colonist attacked Japanese people or carried on an independence movement? As the article said above he died in a suicide attack. You don't know what suicide attack meant during the WWII? No way!!!! You are a man of considerable learning!!!

Tinami Amori
12-05-2010, 07:35 AM
:confused: What is your point above?

What’s my point? My point is to participate in a discussion and to express my opinion on this issue which started several pages ago by other posters who are aware of certain specifics…. Have you read this topic from beginning?

Here are few posts on this discussion....


Sorry to interrupt. I am not so sure her "Arirang FP" will be very well received in Tokyo. Maybe it would be a little like performing "Bells of Moscow" in North America.


I agree with you. There is no reason to think the non-Korean audience will be moved by "Arirang". In fact, I think she reduces her chance of winning by (i) performing Arirang in Japan, and (ii) not participating in other competitions prior to the Worlds. However, the dramatic effects she can generate by doing so is huge. With or without winning the title, her message to her countrymen will be delivered very effectively.


I don't know how the Japanese will react to Arirang. BUT, Arirang is simply gorgeous music, and I'm not sure why you think that Non Koreans wouldn't find it beautiful. (I'm non Korean) A year ago I played the music for some American junior high students, these are the type of kids who listen to rap etc none were Korean. And all of them really liked it. Obviously there's more cultural stuff at play with Japan, but the music in and of itself is something Non Koreans can appreciate. Great music is something that kind of transcends audiences and cultures IMO. I think Non Korean and Non Japanese will think they are hearing a pretty and moving piece of music.

etc. and so on….

RunnersHigh
12-05-2010, 07:57 AM
Oops! Double posted!!!