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sk9tingfan
11-14-2010, 02:39 PM
Every season, skaters are vulnerable in terms of not living up to their potential. However, it seems that this season, individuals who you would think would not give into them are doing so in spades. Is this my imagination or just a function of another post-Olympic year? It seems to be far worse.

Please discuss.

REO
11-14-2010, 05:22 PM
You're probably right about the post Olympic year. When the Olys are getting close athletes tend to go into overdrive because that is their ultimate goal. Now they can take it easier for a year or two and then rev it up again.

museksk8r
11-14-2010, 05:37 PM
And it's not only that many of the skaters are making multiple errors, but I've found I don't like the programs of many skaters as much this season as previous seasons.

kwanfan1818
11-14-2010, 05:47 PM
The post-Olympic year is also one in which skaters can experiment with new styles, switch to new coaches, and/or re-tool their technique. It will take sometime for the changes to gel.

There's also pressure for some skaters to establish themselves: in nations with deep teams to become a contender for the world team or to regain as spot, to grab the top in Europe or ROW, or to finally position themselves to medal at the world level and establish themselves in the minds of the judges as potential Sochi medalists. This type of pressure might not be as great as being the front runner who is chased, but it can be formidable and frustrating if it doesn't work out.

julieann
11-14-2010, 05:49 PM
And it's not only that many of the skaters are making multiple errors, but I've found I don't like the programs of many skaters as much this season as previous seasons.

ITA, I'm also dissapointed some of the top skaters aren't competing for various reasons but I'm really dissapointed the skaters who were given the opportunity aren't useing it to their full advantage.

Sylvia
11-14-2010, 07:40 PM
I would say that, generally speaking, competitive skaters have a tough enough job living up to their own high expectations of themselves day in and day out without having to hear about how they aren't fulfilling their potential or their fans' expections of them. I don't happen to believe that this season is any different or worse than previous ones.

DickButtonFan
11-14-2010, 07:43 PM
I don't like many of this years programs either. I'm shocked that after all these years I'm still waiting for someone to excite me the way mk, cohen and yags did.

I've said in a dif thread somewhere that I wouldn't pick over half the music these skaters have.

The ugliest music choice I give to Agnes' sp, really don't like the grunting sounds.

The choreography this year is so bland to me except for maybe dai and mao's lp ( don't like her sp).

I thought rachael would come out with some kind of mk transformation considering she took off of school but no, same old music types. Hope she does something better next year.

Zhang really has impressed me this season tho and I like her sp music ok.

julieann
11-14-2010, 07:45 PM
I would say that, generally speaking, competitive skaters have a tough enough job living up to their own high expectations of themselves day in and day out without having to hear about how they aren't fulfilling their potential or their fans' expections of them. I don't happen to believe that this season is any different or worse than previous ones.

It's much worse in pairs than in previous years.

kwanfan1818
11-14-2010, 10:11 PM
Nm

haribobo
11-15-2010, 12:22 AM
It's much worse in pairs than in previous years.

Disagree. Most of the top pairs the last 10 years or so bored me to death. Medalists were so predictable and choreography on a whole was just dull. The most successful ones on the GP this season have been new and fun, if not the most technically proficient at this point. A changing of the guard was so badly needed, and I'm very glad we're getting it (even moreso with the absence of DubDavs, Zhangs, KawSmirs due to injury and whatnot, not that I wish injury on anyone)

Go, new teams, go! :cheer:

skatesindreams
11-15-2010, 12:34 AM
It doesn't seem different from the first year of any new Olympic cycle.
There's always change: new requirements, and uncertanty - as competitors adjust, and "position" themselves.

Some skaters thrive; and others don't.

Aussie Willy
11-15-2010, 02:02 AM
I would say that, generally speaking, competitive skaters have a tough enough job living up to their own high expectations of themselves day in and day out without having to hear about how they aren't fulfilling their potential or their fans' expections of them. I don't happen to believe that this season is any different or worse than previous ones.

I agree. And I don't think it is fair to judge just on the GP season. The GP season has very few programs that usually surpass expectations. Most skaters are using these events to try and work out what they can improve on and they usually do get better as the season goes along.

However I don't think it is any better or any worse than any previous post Olympics or start of any season that I can recall.

overedge
11-15-2010, 02:05 AM
I would say that, generally speaking, competitive skaters have a tough enough job living up to their own high expectations of themselves day in and day out without having to hear about how they aren't fulfilling their potential or their fans' expections of them. I don't happen to believe that this season is any different or worse than previous ones.

^^This. Plus I would imagine that many of them are feeling extra pressure knowing that it's a post-Olympic year, and so there will be more intense competition to be recognized as the one(s) who will become the front-runners in the next few years.

Seerek
11-15-2010, 02:49 AM
I personally find the post-Olympic years very interesting because you really do get a perspective of "old guard" vs. "new guard" competing against one another. Can the old guard hang on - or is it already the new guard's turn?

In 1995, we saw Kulik and Slutskaya appear for the first time
in 1999, Totmianina and Marinin made their debut, as well as Sarah Hughes
in 2003, Joannie Rochette, Carolina Kostner were new, as was Tomas Verner
in 2007, we saw new teams like Kawaguti/Smirnov and Virtue/Moir

burntBREAD
11-15-2010, 02:54 AM
I personally find the post-Olympic years very interesting because you really do get a perspective of "old guard" vs. "new guard" competing against one another. Can the old guard hang on - or is it already the new guard's turn?

In 1995, we saw Kulik and Slutskaya appear for the first time
in 1999, Totmianina and Marinin made their debut, as well as Sarah Hughes
in 2003, Joannie Rochette, Carolina Kostner were new, as was Tomas Verner
in 2007, we saw new teams like Kawaguti/Smirnov and Virtue/Moir

Not to mention Mao, Yuna, and a reinvented Miki in 2006-07! :rollin: