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Beefcake
10-18-2010, 11:47 PM
The doctor of Nadya Suleman, better known as Octomom, is in a hearing this week to determine the fate of his medical license. Article (www.cnn.com/2010/SHOWBIZ/celebrity.news.gossip/10/18/octuplets.doctor.hearing/?hpt=T2)


Kamrava "will say she demanded all 12 embryos and, because it was the weekend, :huh: he did not know what to do," said California Deputy Attorney General Judith Alvarado. "But he knew it was unsafe."


The Medical Board of California's complaint said the doctor should have referred Suleman to a mental health physician after she repeatedly returned to him for treatments shortly after each of her pregnancies.

Suleman has freely admitted that she was mentally "ill" in her extreme pursuit of having babies, and now regrets the situation she's put herself and her children in. (While of course thankful for her children themselves.) An aside: I'm still floored that these children were born without visible birth defects, and to this day appear healthy and normal. Do any of them even have eye glasses? (Common preemie side effect)

What do you think? Is the doctor more guilty, or is Suleman? Was she mentally ill enough that he, her physician, should have gotten others involved? Or was her obsession such that he had to go through with the implanting of the dozen babies?

Norlite
10-19-2010, 12:26 AM
Why is his license in jeopardy?

It is a legal procedure, isn't it? No physical harm resulted? (although there's a chance of that in any legal medical procedure, but the fact that this one was successful should speak for him)

numbers123
10-19-2010, 12:39 AM
I think there has been ethical issues since the beginning of the saga. And the article states that his peers believe that he should have referred her to mental health prior to implantation of the last 8, if not earlier ones.
I believe that licenses can be suspended for unethical behavior. And if his peers determine that he was negligent in recognizing mental illness, he could be found as not practicing competent medical care.

genevieve
10-19-2010, 12:39 AM
What do you think? Is the doctor more guilty, or is Suleman? Was she mentally ill enough that he, her physician, should have gotten others involved? Or was her obsession such that he had to go through with the implanting of the dozen babies?
I think it's a complex issue and I don't know enough about the licensing restrictions etc etc to say whether he was negligent in any way. But I don't think that any patient's obsession or mental illness 'forces' a doctor to go through with implanting a litter. To blame this on her from a medical standards point of view is rather absurd. It might be different if she was hitting up different doctors for each pregnancy and was hiding her history, but she kept going back to the same doc, right?

skatemommy
10-19-2010, 12:47 AM
I think the doctor should pay the welfare bill. One or two of the preemies has a cleft palate. I've seen pictures of some of them with glasses

KikiSashaFan
10-19-2010, 12:47 AM
I don't know all the details, I said both, but I would put more on her. She couldn't properly care for the children she already had, so even if her intention was to have only one more child, that was irresponsible.

susan6
10-19-2010, 01:15 AM
Why is his license in jeopardy?

It is a legal procedure, isn't it? No physical harm resulted? (although there's a chance of that in any legal medical procedure, but the fact that this one was successful should speak for him)

Implanting large numbers of embryos (as in more than three at a time) is only supposed to be done in extremely rare cases, for women who have had previous failed attempts at IVF. Nadya was the exact opposite....she had had a successful previous pregnancy with a multiple birth from IVF. What the doctor did was way outside the guidelines, AND he was dealing with an obviously mentally ill patient. So....mostly his fault, I would say. He could have just said "no" and referred her to another doctor. But he implanted TWELVE because "it was the weekend" (I agree, :huh: ). She probably was badgering the crap out of him and he caved. But he should have recognized that she already had too many kids to deal with and wasn't in her right mind.

Really
10-19-2010, 01:16 AM
The good doctor could have said, "No."

Lacey
10-19-2010, 01:58 AM
I thought I read that an ethical number would have been two. If so, he should be convicted of something. However, I wouldn't want her to think that because he is guilty, she is not.

danceronice
10-19-2010, 02:04 AM
Both of them. She shouldn't have asked, and he should have said "no".

Gazpacho
10-19-2010, 02:09 AM
I thought I read that an ethical number would have been two. If so, he should be convicted of something. However, I wouldn't want her to think that because he is guilty, she is not.ITA. The doctor violated medical guidelines, as established by the relevant medical association in which he was a member (the Society for Reproductive Medicine). The guidelines are there for a reason. Implanting that many embryos is dangerous for the mother as well.

As to how much Nadya is to blame, that's a difficult question. Mental illness can strip away all rationality, reasoning, and impulse control. Was hers that severe? I don't know.

Overall, I'd put more of the blame on the doctor though.

overedge
10-19-2010, 03:06 AM
What does it being the weekend have to do with his decision? Even people who aren't doctors would have a pretty good idea that implanting 12 embryos is probably not a really smart idea, no matter what day of the week it is.

attyfan
10-19-2010, 03:28 AM
My instincts blame the doctor much more than the patient. He is supposed to be trained at recognizing problems (both the dangers of implanting 12 and the mental illness).

Prancer
10-19-2010, 03:48 AM
ITA. The doctor violated medical guidelines, as established by the relevant medical association in which he was a member (the Society for Reproductive Medicine). The guidelines are there for a reason. Implanting that many embryos is dangerous for the mother as well.

As to how much Nadya is to blame, that's a difficult question. Mental illness can strip away all rationality, reasoning, and impulse control. Was hers that severe? I don't know.

Overall, I'd put more of the blame on the doctor though.

ITA. And I don't find the argument that she would have just found another doctor persuasive. So what? Then THAT doctor would be the one whose license was in jeopardy.

rfisher
10-19-2010, 04:14 AM
I blamed Kate.