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Prancer
10-15-2010, 08:26 PM
I was trying to watch 'Grey's Anatomy' online. I searched for it and couldn't find it. I could only get what I was looking for by getting rid of the apostrophe :rofl:

Really? I tried "Grey's Anatomy" and it took me right here: http://abc.go.com/shows/greys-anatomy Full episodes and everything.

And there's a whole page of links like:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey's_Anatomy
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grey's_Anatomy

:confused:

Norlite
10-15-2010, 08:45 PM
Really? I tried "Grey's Anatomy" and it took me right here: http://abc.go.com/shows/greys-anatomy Full episodes and everything

:confused:


That link woudn't help Jen. Or me either.

Prancer
10-15-2010, 08:48 PM
That link woudn't help Jen. Or me either.

Oh, yeah, I always forget those "geographical restrictions."

Dragonlady
10-15-2010, 09:41 PM
In Canada, if you want Grey's Anatomy, you have to go to the CTV Website.

*Jen*
10-15-2010, 11:03 PM
Oh, yeah, I always forget those "geographical restrictions."


In Canada, if you want Grey's Anatomy, you have to go to the CTV Website.

Alas, I'm not in Canada either.

I should have explained a little more - I could find it very easily to download a torrent or stream it - BUT I have a subscription to Graboid (it's apparently legal) which means I can download without the virus worry and watch later. On my search of Graboid, the apostrophe made all the difference. I could find last series, but not this one.

Nmsis
10-16-2010, 02:49 AM
But that is also the case with the original wording, in which the authorization can be oral or written. There might be a piece of paper, there might not be. The original wording would indicate to me that the authorization was more likely to be oral, actually, but that would be a guess on my part and not something I would count on.
That's the moment when one realize the nuances between similar words in diffirent languages are really different. ;) (mainly because "additional authorization" sounds so administrative that I would automatically make the link with a written paper when that may actually be the opposite in english (?))



Whether you discussed the matter or you had a discussion about the matter, "the matter" can still be either an anecdote or the subject of a serious discussion that needed time. There is no indication in either of the weight of "the matter," although in English. "the matter" would imply that the topic was a serious one, whether it was discussed or the subject of a discssion.
Ok. A noun or a verb would really imply a different nuance in french. Emphasizing the action or the process / result. If they are 100% equivalent for americans, that's something my mind is going to have trouble to deal with. That's always a good thing to learn. Thank you. :)



Is this the case for French children, as well? Could a student greet a teacher with "Good morning, Mr. xxxx, you m-f'er!" if done in a sweet and cheerful manner?
In what way would it be done nicely or smartly ? That's just plain, in your face, agressivity.

Now let me tell you a story my grandfather told me. He was a student in medecine in the 20s. One day, one of his fellow students, let's call him A, went to see Mister B, an official of some kind in the university. He said :
"Mr B, this is scandal. I'm outraged. I'm being publicly insulted, that's a shame. I protest."

After a lot of protestation, A brings Mr B to the crime scene. And there, on the wall, in big letters, are written those words :
"MISTER B IS AN IDIOT" (Monsieur B est un con)

Then Mister B begins to look at A rather suspiciously.
"And can you tell me in what way you are being insulted, A ?"
Then A takes Mr B by the arm and brings him closer to the wall, in a corner of the big sentence, in which it is writen in very little letters :
"And A is an idiot too"
"See ?"

A had to wash the whole thing and do some additional work but nothing drastic. Students had a good laugh and the university officials too.
That was impertinence but yes, as long as it is done in a smart way, we tend to appreciate/forgive that.



It sheds a new and very different light on French culture for me.
French culture is a diverse as it could be.
Foreign people tend to consider it very aristocratic and sophisticated. It can be.
But actually if there is an aristocratic culture, there is also a working class culture, a culture of the poors that tends to be beloved even by the upper class. Céline, Bruant, Edith Piaf, Yves Montand, Gainsbourg ... They all come from the poorest background. And even when glory came, they remained close to their roots. People don't associate accordion (aka "the piano of the poor") with France for nothing. And aristocraty has always run to watch them sing, perform. Slang becomes poetry and dirty words become elegant in their mouth. It is a different kind of aristocracy that is very much beloved here and is not afraid of words. That is definitly part of my culture. It encompasses the whole social spectrum. I don't know a french person who doesn't lurve the songs of Léo Ferré (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aiXcUTTLud4) (who was an anarchist), whatever part of the political spectrum they belong to or whatever their wealth. And I could find equivalents from nowadays like Noir Désir (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrgcRvBJYBE), Benjamin Biolay ...

I would find a lot of french songs where the words "baiser" (fcuk or scr*w), "merde" (shit), "putain" (whore), "salope" (b*tch), even "pédé" (fag), "con" (a**hole, stupid or idiot) are used in really interesting ways that may actually be also funny, lovely or even moving.

Words are screens on which we can project ideas or emotions. They are not bad in themselves.

Prancer
10-16-2010, 03:27 AM
That's the moment when one realize the nuances between similar words in diffirent languages are really different. ;) (mainly because "additional authorization" sounds so administrative that I would automatically make the link with a written paper when that may actually be the opposite in english (?))

For me, it's the word "emanated" that would make me think it was oral rather than written. While emanated can mean "issued," it is more often used in the sense of "spreading outward," as in "the scent emanated from the candle."

So I would have the impression that the authorization was being spread orally, although again, I wouldn't know for sure. If I were concerned about the nature of the authorization, I would have to ask. A phrase like "additional authorization" sounds all pompous and officious, but that doesn't mean it is. It just means that someone official said "Go ahead" in some way.


Ok. A noun or a verb would really imply a different nuance in french. Emphasizing the action or the process / result. If they are 100% equivalent for americans, that's something my mind is going to have trouble to deal with. That's always a good thing to learn. Thank you. :)

It's not that they are equivalent, exactly. In terms of meaning, there are times when you might want to say that "A discussion was held" instead of "We discussed" because the meaning would then be different, but there is no real difference between "had a discussion about" and "discussed" except for the former being a wordier way of saying it.

This is the sort of thing that made me cross-eyed and crazy when I was studying other languages :P.


Words are screens on which we can project ideas or emotions. They are not bad in themselves.

That was the first thing I learned in linguistics--words are neither good nor bad but thinking makes them so. We spent a lot of time talking about taboo words, which was much more interesting than talking about the international phonetic alphabet, the next subject at hand :P.

Artemis@BC
10-21-2010, 06:33 PM
Oooh, just encountered another of my pet peeves on the radio this am: misuse of the word ironic. The radio host was talking about the new guidelines for doing CPR, and that one way to get the right 100 beats-per-minute rate was to use a song beat. The song suggested by the experts was, as he put it, "ironically titled 'Staying Alive.' "

Um, no, that's not irony. That's an amusing, probably intentional choice, or otherwise a coincidence. Almost the opposite of irony.

Is it just me, or is ironic used incorrrectly far more frequently than correctly? We can't even blame Alanis Morissette ...

Icetalavista
10-22-2010, 02:26 AM
While verb-izing nouns is annoying, at least it comes close to conveying what the speaker actually means...in contrast to "I could care less," which conveys the OPPOSITE.

I'm a nurse, and we use printed reports to tell the next shift the status of patients. Some nurses have such poor punctuation, or a complete lack of punctuation, that the meaning of their sentences can be interpreted multiple ways. Dangerous.

OTOH, I'm glad English is flexible enough to survive sloppy grammar and spelling,and to borrow from any language.