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View Full Version : Goodbye, cruel words: English. It's dead to me



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PrincessLeppard
10-14-2010, 03:30 AM
Heathen. Profaner of the English language.

Etc.

:saint:

Prancer
10-14-2010, 03:44 AM
Heathen. Profaner of the English language.

Wonderful titles. I will wear them with pride whenever I go out. And I am sure that people will have questions. Where did they come from? What are they based on?

:saint:

John 3 17
10-14-2010, 03:56 AM
Wonderful titles. I will wear them with pride whenever I go out. And I am sure that people will have questions. Where did they come from? What are they based on?

:saint:

You're killin' me! :rofl:

The day I learned not to apply Latin rules to English was a great day!

-Bridget

jlai
10-14-2010, 03:59 AM
Speaking of profaner, there was an article on the WSJ about the decline of cursing:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703794104575545553828507786.html

Japanfan
10-14-2010, 09:28 AM
I also have issues with some of the new words being coined in academia.
For example, 'historicization' and 'problematization'.

I edit work for a PhD student who insists on using these two words, though I advise him against it.
They are ugly to read, ugly to enunciate. . .and I do not see why the English language needs them at all. IMO it is much preferable to say 'historical perspective' and 'examine problems'.

Reuven
10-14-2010, 11:02 AM
That's an age-old problem. Polysyllabic superciliousness does not make one sound smarter. ;)

Dragonlady
10-14-2010, 03:42 PM
A few years back the word "paradigm" came into vogue and was the buzzword of the moment in management circles. No one used models or examples, everything was a "paradigm". IMO, it was another example of using a relatively obscure word to sound important, when a more common, simple word would have worked as well, if not better.

Mercifully, paradigm dropped out of vogue shortly thereafter returned to the "word of the day" lists.

Norlite
10-14-2010, 03:51 PM
Polysyllabic superciliousness does not make one sound smarter. ;)



I'm stealing that and sending it to my daughter to share with her roommates.


I shall say "I was readin' stuff, saw this, and thought of yous guys"

Nomad
10-14-2010, 04:03 PM
That's an age-old problem. Polysyllabic superciliousness does not make one sound smarter. ;)

I would have loved to use that line on my former boss. She was guilty of that all the time. I just grit my teeth and put up with it, though; she wasn't an English major and rarely read anything other than the newspaper, so her exposure to good writing was limited to whatever was forced on her in school twenty years ago.

Garden Kitty
10-14-2010, 04:31 PM
One pet peeve of mine is the name of one of Santa's reindeer in The Night Before Christmas. Donner has become more common than Donder. (http://www.donder.com/)

But this week I saw a set of embroidered hand towels with the names of Santa's reindeer, including everyone's favorite, Donna.

purple skates
10-14-2010, 04:43 PM
It's the feminist version. :P

Anita18
10-14-2010, 04:45 PM
I also have issues with some of the new words being coined in academia.
For example, 'historicization' and 'problematization'.

I edit work for a PhD student who insists on using these two words, though I advise him against it.
They are ugly to read, ugly to enunciate. . .and I do not see why the English language needs them at all. IMO it is much preferable to say 'historical perspective' and 'examine problems'.
OMG :scream: :scream: :scream: :scream:

Prancer
10-14-2010, 04:51 PM
Speaking of profaner, there was an article on the WSJ about the decline of cursing:
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703794104575545553828507786.html

Taboo words tend to work their way into common use as they lose their shock value; new taboo words take their place.

An article on taboo words from 1938 that now seems :eek:: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,848910,00.html

And a short one on the history of some taboo words (er, the article actually USES many taboo words, so don't read if you are offended by cursing): http://alllie.com/dirtywords.shtml


I also have issues with some of the new words being coined in academia.
For example, 'historicization' and 'problematization'.

In writing classes, students are told to "shun the tions!"

Then some of the students become academics and can't help themselves.


Mercifully, paradigm dropped out of vogue shortly thereafter returned to the "word of the day" lists.

I remember going to a conference in 1992 and a friend of mine saying that if she heard the word "paradigm" one more time, she was going to scream.:lol:

I still hear or see "paradigm" several times a week.

Artemis@BC
10-14-2010, 04:51 PM
I hate nouns being turned into adjectives by adding a -y to the end. Or, worse, adding a final -y to a word that already is an adjective.

Or, adding the suffix "-ness" to an adjective to turn it to a noun ... when a perfectly good noun already exists. Like patheticness instead of pathos, stupidness instead of stupidity, anxiousness instead of anxiety, etc.

Anita18
10-14-2010, 05:04 PM
Or, adding the suffix "-ness" to an adjective to turn it to a noun ... when a perfectly good noun already exists. Like patheticness instead of pathos, stupidness instead of stupidity, anxiousness instead of anxiety, etc.
I do that when having fun with my coworkers. :lol: Another coworker uses the suffix "-osity" in the same manner. :lol: