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PDilemma
10-13-2010, 02:48 PM
Ooh! Thought of another one: "should of" instead of "should have" :lol:

-Bridget

And "could of" and "would of" and just using "of" in place of "have" in any context.

I spent half my English teaching career on the following issues:

1. "Of" is never a verb.

2. Apostrophes are used for possessives and contractions. They are not used to make a word plural.

3. I do not know what "in the begging" means. The word is "beginning".

4. Use commas. Please.

But I still always read stuff like this:

"Hamlet could of made a different choice in the begging but he didnt of the gut's." :wall:

Dragonlady
10-13-2010, 03:53 PM
Oh, that's another thing my boss does when writing papers. It can be complicated, because we're often referring to experiment methodology done in the past, but at the same time, we're also referring to results from those experiments that are presently true. :wall:

"Presently" means in the near future. You're also referring to results from those experiements that are currently true. :wall:

Squibble
10-13-2010, 03:55 PM
"Hamlet could of made a different choice in the begging but he didnt of the gut's." :wall:

"I use to make mistakes like those before I studied grammar." ;)

Artemis@BC
10-13-2010, 04:49 PM
Oh, what great timing! I was just musing about a grammar peeves post because of yet another encounter with the dreaded "I could care less." Yesterday's instance was with a client, so I had to bite back my usual reply of "Really? How much less?"

As much as that one bugs me, though, I think my least favourite misused word is "literally." There's just no excuse for it. The only time you're allowed to say "it is literally raining cats and dogs" is if you're having a really busy day at the animal shelter. :D

"Verbing" bothers me less, as my advancing years have granted me the serenity to accept that language does evolve, and many verbs we take for granted were once lowly nouns. I was good enough for Shakespeare. Plus verbing can be fun.

I do have specific verb usage peeves, though, mostly related to media buzz-terms. For example, not really verbing but ... I figure if you're going to use "grow" as a transitive verb, you'd better be talking about vegetables. It's bad enough hearing about promises to "grow your investment," but when I heard about Vancouver's strategy to "grow cycling" in the city, I screamed at the radio. Literally.

Anita18
10-13-2010, 05:03 PM
"Presently" means in the near future. You're also referring to results from those experiements that are currently true. :wall:
What about stuff that we posture is currently AND presently true? :lol: We want to give our work some credit here!

Nora_Charles
10-13-2010, 05:06 PM
No one has mentioned my absolute "favorite" grammatical error: "anyways". NO, NO, NO!!!! There is no "s" in the word "anyway". Same is true for "all". Or the new one I keep hearing, "welp", used in place of "well". As in "Welp, I'm off for the grocery store!". Why are you addressing newborn puppies? (Yes, I know that's "whelp", but still...)

My Business English instructor would give us extra credit points for bringing in typos from the newspaper. The best one ever was from a story about two semis that ran into a garbage truck. The line was supposed to read "The semis hit a garbage truck". It was given an entirely different meaning by the typist who entered "The semi shit a garbage truck". Proofreading pays! :)

Artemis@BC
10-13-2010, 05:13 PM
More on verbing, from two authoritative sources:

Bucky (http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a89/ArtemisNorth/getfuzzy04-27-03verbing.gif)

Calvin (http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a89/ArtemisNorth/CHverbing.gif)

Nora_Charles
10-13-2010, 05:18 PM
More on verbing, from two authoritative sources:

Bucky (http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a89/ArtemisNorth/getfuzzy04-27-03verbing.gif)

Calvin (http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a89/ArtemisNorth/CHverbing.gif)


awwwwwww I love Calvin & Hobbes!!

Artemis@BC
10-13-2010, 05:27 PM
... The best one ever was from a story about two semis that ran into a garbage truck. The line was supposed to read "The semis hit a garbage truck". It was given an entirely different meaning by the typist who entered "The semi shit a garbage truck". Proofreading pays! :)

I saw a related one in a document I was editing: what was supposed to be "agricultural farm labour pool" was instead "agricultural farm labour poo." :D

Unfortunately, though, proofreading does not really pay. Not that much, anyway. If it were better paying, perhaps we'd see fewer mistakes in the newspapers.

Oh, hey, there's another peeve of mine: fewer vs. less. Is it really so hard to get that one right?

Nora_Charles
10-13-2010, 05:31 PM
Unfortunately, though, proofreading does not really pay. Not that much, anyway. If it were better paying, perhaps we'd see fewer mistakes in the newspapers.

:lol:

skatingfan5
10-13-2010, 05:34 PM
Unfortunately, though, proofreading does not really pay. Not that much, anyway. If it were better paying, perhaps we'd see fewer mistakes in the newspapers.I doubt it -- newspapers are cutting expenses to the bone and copy editors may go the way of the Linotype.
Oh, hey, there's another peeve of mine: fewer vs. less. Is it really so hard to get that one right?Anymores it seems that less and less people use "fewer" and "less" correctly. They could care fewer, more or less. :P

Anita18
10-13-2010, 05:44 PM
No one has mentioned my absolute "favorite" grammatical error: "anyways". NO, NO, NO!!!! There is no "s" in the word "anyway". Same is true for "all". Or the new one I keep hearing, "welp", used in place of "well". As in "Welp, I'm off for the grocery store!". Why are you addressing newborn puppies? (Yes, I know that's "whelp", but still...)
My sister and I totally use those in conversation with our friends and with each other. :rofl: DEFINITELY not in writing though!

Nora_Charles
10-13-2010, 06:16 PM
My sister and I totally use those in conversation with our friends and with each other. :rofl: DEFINITELY not in writing though!

:huh: Those words don't sound better spoken than written...:slinkaway

Squibble
10-13-2010, 06:20 PM
It turns out that this


he believes in the tenants of his religion.

wasn't a misspelling after all:


So, gay marriage, homosexuality is wrong, unless you're renting out (http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2010/10/13/2010-10-13_gop_governor_hopeful_carl_paladino_cashed_on_bu ffalo_gay_clubs_cobalt_buddies_ii.html) space in your building to a gay club. Or if your son co-owns one.

How could I have missed that? :duh:

orientalplane
10-13-2010, 06:34 PM
"More happy", to me, sounds totally incorrect...but I could be wrong.


Perhaps it depends on where you're taught. To me, saying, "She looks more happy than when I last saw her" sounds perfectly OK. I remember that when I was doing my English degree, I used more+adjective in my essays quite a lot, as I grew to like the way it sounded. My tutors never picked up on this as being wrong, but maybe they would elsewhere in the world. :)