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View Full Version : Goodbye, cruel words: English. It's dead to me



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skatingfan5
10-12-2010, 09:41 PM
"he believes in the tenants of his religion" I wonder how much rent he is charging. ;)

purple skates
10-12-2010, 09:50 PM
Now, now, everyone. Don't loose it.

(That one makes me want to scream! It's all over the place, too, like some sort of viral mutant typo.)

skatingfan5
10-12-2010, 09:57 PM
Now, now, everyone. Don't loose it.

(That one makes me want to scream! It's all over the place, too, like some sort of viral mutant typo.)That's the right attitude! Don't take English language abuse laying down! ;) Anymore I'm tired of people playing fast and lose with there grammar, spelling, and whatnot. :P

purple skates
10-12-2010, 10:02 PM
:rofl: I read this thread, then the very next thread I read, in the first post, it's/its is misused not once, but twice!

Dragonlady
10-12-2010, 10:03 PM
The one that makes me crazy is "connect" when it's used in place of "call" or "meet with", i.e. "I've been trying to connect with him for a week" or "When would you like to connect?".

mikemba
10-13-2010, 12:27 AM
"tollerance."



This is actually a correctly spelled word -- it means enjoyment of Toller's skating. :P

jlai
10-13-2010, 12:51 AM
tollerance - tolerance of highway tolls
trollerance - putting up with trolls on discussion boards :P

Squibble
10-13-2010, 12:59 AM
This is actually a correctly spelled word -- it means enjoyment of Toller's skating. :P

Indeed. Thomas Hardy used it several times in Far from the Massive Madding Crowd. ;)

barbk
10-13-2010, 04:53 AM
It wasn't until I said "What is 'alpha alpha'?" that I realized what they were trying to say. As soon as a heard "alpha alpha" I realized they meant alfalfa.

That was probably what caused the professor, to, ahem (sorry, sk8r1964) loose it. ;) I remember him railing about the utter stupidity of students who heard something - alpha alpha in this case -- and who never thought to ask, "Why would this province of China have a fodder I've never heard of," or, "Why would a Chinese fodder be named using the spelling of letters from the Greek alphabet?" as well as general comments on their overall education if they'd really never heard about alfalfa by that point in their educations.

It is much funnier in retrospect, but at the time I just prayed that I would never, ever do anything that would cause him to get that mad at me. I wonder what he thinks of it now?

But, it's a doggy dog world world out there, and the tenants of my religion are generally cat people, so I'm kind of stuck. Maybe we'll connect in a better way going forward, when I'm able to reach out with greater tollerance. ;)

Anita18
10-13-2010, 06:18 AM
I also dislike the ever-increasing tendency to report in present rather than past tense. If it happened in the past, I don't want a play by play - use past tense!
Oh, that's another thing my boss does when writing papers. It can be complicated, because we're often referring to experiment methodology done in the past, but at the same time, we're also referring to results from those experiments that are presently true. :wall:

John 3 17
10-13-2010, 10:12 AM
Ooh! Thought of another one: "should of" instead of "should have" :lol:

-Bridget

orientalplane
10-13-2010, 10:21 AM
"I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less" always makes me :confused: as it's so obviously saying the exact opposite of what you mean. Thankfully, I've never actually heard it said, and have only read it on message boards.

*Jen*
10-13-2010, 12:45 PM
Saying someone is "more pretty" or "more happy" is a perfectly acceptable alternative to "prettier" or "happier". Often it gives more elegance to a sentence (though I'm not saying that's necessarily the case in the example you cite).


Are you sure? Because the way I was taught, and the way I was taught to teach, 2 syllable words ending with 'y' always have an 'ier' and 'iest' ending. "More happy", to me, sounds totally incorrect...but I could be wrong.


Now, now, everyone. Don't loose it.

(That one makes me want to scream! It's all over the place, too, like some sort of viral mutant typo.)

:shuffle:


"I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less" always makes me :confused: as it's so obviously saying the exact opposite of what you mean. Thankfully, I've never actually heard it said, and have only read it on message boards.

Me too! It doesn't make any sense. It makes me wonder...if you could care less, then why don't you? :confused:

allezfred
10-13-2010, 12:48 PM
Pacifically....

John 3 17
10-13-2010, 01:51 PM
"Expecially"... a lot of people pronounce "especially" this way and it drives me batty!

Spelling "definitely" as "defiantly", that one always gets under my skin.

-Bridget