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Anita18
09-25-2010, 01:45 AM
I assumed the water *was* that hot. At any rate, I wash my dishes by hand with hot water and detergent, place them in my dishwasher to dry, and once it's full, run the diswasher on the last cycle (without detergent), let them air dry, then store them. So I guess none of this applies to me. :confused:
Why do you wash your dishes twice? It seems like a waste of water and energy (yours and the dishwasher's) to me.

My roommate and I don't have a full set of anything between us, so we wash everything by hand. Hot water and Dawn does the trick for almost everything, while scraping off burnt milk off a metal pan is good exercise. (Although yeah, there could be a better use of my time...) We use the dishwasher to store large bowls and blender items. :lol: It must be a frugal Asian thing. The only Asians I know who use dishwashers are those with big new expensive houses and thus have the means to buy full sets of silverware, glasses, and plates.

I don't even think it's necessary to sterilize things when you wash them, aside from the obvious things like cutting boards and knives used for raw meat. I work in a lab and the only things we sterilize are the things that CAN'T have bacteria in them. (Namely, when we're trying to grow our cells and bacteria, which don't have skin and/or immune systems. :lol: ) Otherwise I'd think our digestive system handles most little nasties fine.

zhenya271
09-25-2010, 03:07 AM
detrimental to your drinking glasses how?

Supposedly if your dishes aren't dirty enough your detergent could attack your glasses and leave permanent etching. I've seen the article pop up a couple of times on yahoo, I think it also includes information about how most people tend to use way more laundry detergent than we really need to, that even the predetermined measured line on the cup is even too much.

milanessa
09-25-2010, 03:10 AM
I shall protect my glasses from attack. :confused:

zhenya271
09-25-2010, 03:39 AM
I shall protect my glasses from attack. :confused:

LOL! I'm not a complete convert,yet. It's still hard for anyone else in the house to open up the dishwasher and tell if it's been run through or not because I still do a quick rinse under the faucet. I definitely have to rinse if I'm not running it that night.

jlai
09-25-2010, 03:47 AM
Why do you wash your dishes twice? It seems like a waste of water and energy (yours and the dishwasher's) to me.

My roommate and I don't have a full set of anything between us, so we wash everything by hand. Hot water and Dawn does the trick for almost everything, while scraping off burnt milk off a metal pan is good exercise. (Although yeah, there could be a better use of my time...) We use the dishwasher to store large bowls and blender items. :lol: It must be a frugal Asian thing. The only Asians I know who use dishwashers are those with big new expensive houses and thus have the means to buy full sets of silverware, glasses, and plates.


Yeah, I never figured out the washing twice thing.
I have a set of silverware, glasses and plates because I got them as gifts (though I didn't even want them).

zhenya271
09-25-2010, 03:51 AM
Here's an article about why you shouldn't rinse before. I couldn't find the one that included the laundry detergent information.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/21/garden/21fix.html

mkats
09-25-2010, 04:04 AM
I've never used a dishwasher :shuffle: My family always does them by hand.

Prancer
09-25-2010, 10:26 AM
I think it also includes information about how most people tend to use way more laundry detergent than we really need to, that even the predetermined measured line on the cup is even too much.

I think this is definitely true. My mom always told me to use as little detergent and fabric softener as I could because otherwise they build up on clothes and make them dingy and coat the inside of the washer. I looked at her laundry and other people's laundry and figured she was right, so I always used far less than the recommended amount.

And it seems Mom was, once again, right: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703808904575025021214910714.html

I had noticed that my dishes weren't getting clean and I blamed our dishwasher, but then I picked up a Consumer Reports that rated dishwasher detergents and they put the Cascade Complete I had been using a good ways down the list. I went "Huh," and switched to their top recommendation--Finish All-in-One Powerball tabs. And by gosh, I do think the dishes really are cleaner.

Schmeck
09-25-2010, 11:10 AM
I'll try the Finish Powerballs (although the name makes me giggle!) after I use up this crappy bottle of Cascade. I have to shake the bottle before I use it now, as the contents keep separating (sp?) and I get a watery mix with clumps of goo if I don't.

vesperholly
09-25-2010, 12:36 PM
I use a generic gel from my local supermarket chain, and it seems to work OK, though I do get the occasional not-clean dish. I have one glass in particular that always gets a chalky film on its bottom (and didn't used to). Mostly I think I load the dishwasher poorly ... :shuffle:

orbitz
09-25-2010, 12:51 PM
It seems like for the average family size of 5 or less, hand-washing is the better way to go. My family rarely used the dishwasher when I was living at home, and I've never used one once I moved out on my own.

Prancer
09-25-2010, 01:51 PM
It seems like for the average family size of 5 or less, hand-washing is the better way to go. My family rarely used the dishwasher when I was living at home, and I've never used one once I moved out on my own.

I believe it's actually more water-efficient to use the dishwasher.

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2009/01/built-in-dishwasher-vs-hand-washing-which-greener.php

jlai
09-25-2010, 03:02 PM
That's what I heard but you have to use electricity as well.

In fact, that type of questions is always my dilemma. e.g.
If I use paper towel in the public restrooms after I wash my hands I consume paper. If I use a handdryer I consume electricity. Which is worse?

I opt for paper towels and handdrying where possible.

NancyNC
09-25-2010, 04:21 PM
I believe it's actually more water-efficient to use the dishwasher.


That's what I heard but you have to use electricity as well.

Unless you use cold water and hand pump your water from a well, hand washing also uses electricity. And according to most reports I have seen, it uses more since dishwashers can more efficiently use smaller amounts of water.

Anita18
09-25-2010, 07:26 PM
I think this is definitely true. My mom always told me to use as little detergent and fabric softener as I could because otherwise they build up on clothes and make them dingy and coat the inside of the washer. I looked at her laundry and other people's laundry and figured she was right, so I always used far less than the recommended amount.
I use VERY little laundry detergent (I use the Tide 2x concentrated stuff anyway) and my clothes still come out clean, so it's win/win as far as I'm concerned. My clothes smell less strongly of detergent, and I can buy less of it!

My bf used my detergent once and he tossed in a whole capful and I was like, "Dear God why does it smell so strongly of Tide?" :rofl: I didn't criticize him tooo much, since the load he did included my comforter. :lol:


I believe it's actually more water-efficient to use the dishwasher.

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2009/01/built-in-dishwasher-vs-hand-washing-which-greener.php
It completely depends on the situation. As I've mentioned before, my roommate and I don't have a full set of anything so you bet it's more efficient to wash one bowl, one fork, and one cup by hand than to use the dishwasher. :lol: When we're cooking, we still only fill up our very small sink (and maybe the counter), which is about half the size of our dishwasher. To run a full dishwasher, we'd have to buy a lot more stuff, and we just don't find it necessary.