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overedge
09-09-2010, 08:54 PM
Interesting ideas.....
http://tenured-radical.blogspot.com/2010/09/cultural-studies-or-im-not.html

GarrAarghHrumph
09-09-2010, 10:02 PM
What do you find interesting, and why? And what do you suggest re: solutions?

overedge
09-09-2010, 10:15 PM
The suggestion that schools that promote athletics develop the kind of culture that leads to Party Central...which the blogger disagrees with.

I went to boring Canadian schools where athletics didn't get a lot of money and no one really cared how well the sports teams were doing :lol:, so the whole phenomenon of alumni supporting college athletics, and student teams playing in multi-thousand seat stadiums, is very unusual to me. And while some Canadian schools have more of a party culture than others (e.g. Queens University has had some big run-ins with the community about drunken student partying in residential neighbourhoods) even the big party schools have reasonably good academic reputations.

GarrAarghHrumph
09-09-2010, 10:34 PM
A lot of the "party schools" in the US have strong academic reps as well. In the top 10 party school listing from Princeton Review are U Georgia, U Texas Austin, U Florida and Penn State Main - very well ranked unis.

I'm actually wondering if the "party school" thing isn't more related to having a significant proportion of a school's social life be centered on the Greek scene, in addition to/rather than on school sports. I ask that because back in the 1980s and before, the schools that used to be considered party schools often didn't have large sports scenes, but they did tend to have large frat scenes. The way some of those schools got themselves out of that party culture was by disbanding or severely handcuffing their frats, and then actually working hard to provide students with alternative avenues for fun, often completely revamping their student housing system in the process.

Aceon6
09-10-2010, 12:42 AM
Agree with you on the influence of the Greek system. How successful the unis have been in keeping the Animal House culture down to a dull roar seems to be related to how important Greek alum donations are to support athletics and the general endowment. At Georgia, a good chunk of change comes in from Greek alums. The UGa administration does a pretty good job ignoring problems on Greek Row.

zhenya271
09-10-2010, 01:16 AM
My first thought was to put the blame on the Greek social scene.

GarrAarghHrumph
09-10-2010, 02:42 AM
The university I went to was once a famous party school, but they pretty much segregated the frats, breaking apart the old system and making them much less important to the campus life. They also really came down hard on them re: underage drinking and etc., including doing things like throwing entire chapters out/ending their charters, condemning frat houses and donating them to groups like Hillel, buying frat houses and then forcing the frats to move to houses that were hard to get to from campus, etc. I know that the linked blog post doesn't agree with punative methods, but at my school, they worked - the school no longer makes the party school rankings. And maybe the difference is that they didn't punish people as individuals for infractions - they would end the entire frat.

It's not the case that "all frats are bad", ipso facto. There are some schools with significant Greek scenes that aren't at all party schools, but in those cases, there's something that's core to the university's culture that prevents it from being a party school. Example is RPI - very strong engineering school, not a party school. Totally different scene. But the US Dept of Education does say that frat and sorority members drink more than other undergraduate students do, so I think there is something to this idea.

Anita18
09-10-2010, 03:11 AM
It's not the case that "all frats are bad", ipso facto. There are some schools with significant Greek scenes that aren't at all party schools, but in those cases, there's something that's core to the university's culture that prevents it from being a party school. Example is RPI - very strong engineering school, not a party school. Totally different scene.
:rofl: The students at our college consortium's engineering school were renowned as the hardest partiers! One of the grad students here graduated from there, and she's said that if you weren't drunk at the end of the night, that meant you weren't studying hard enough. Supposedly the work was so brutal that getting drunk was the only way they could relax.

Now that she's out of school, she doesn't drink she much anymore. :rofl:

emason
09-10-2010, 03:49 AM
The university I went to was once a famous party school .....

Slightly off-topic, but UMass Amherst by any chance?

Theatregirl1122
09-10-2010, 04:12 AM
:rofl: The students at our college consortium's engineering school were renowned as the hardest partiers! One of the grad students here graduated from there, and she's said that if you weren't drunk at the end of the night, that meant you weren't studying hard enough. Supposedly the work was so brutal that getting drunk was the only way they could relax.


I lived in the engineering dorm at Syracuse. People used to ask me if I lived there so I would have lots of quiet study time. :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: The halls on that floor basically ran with beer and the Engineering frat on campus is one of the hardest partying frats. The engineering dorm was great for finding someone to start the homework with you at midnight the night before it was due. Quiet study time on Friday nights? Not so much.

silverstars
09-10-2010, 05:47 AM
Every college--with maybe the possible exception of a school like Brigham Young--is a party school, some are more effective at hiding it than others. Speaking as a college student who has visited a lot of friends in a lot of very different places, that's just a fact. You can be a large university in the middle of nowhere or a small college in a city, but when you set a bunch of 18+ year-olds free for the first time in their lives, a lot of them are going to go a bit crazy and there isn't all that much the administration can do. It doesn't necessarily have to do with the strength of the Greek system--Vassar is a really wild place to be on a Thursday or Friday night, and that's a small liberal arts college with no Greek life whatsoever (or large athletic program, for that matter)--although it certainly makes the parties and drunken students much more visible. I go to a school with a large athletic program (as well as some fraternities) that no one really cares about, and there are still a lot of parties. We've had a "war on fun" (the newspaper's name for it, not mine) for years, focused particularly on fraternities and sororities, but it's had few noticeable results.

Lanie
09-10-2010, 05:58 AM
I went to a private, Christian university and I believe we are one of the few Christian universities in the US (if not the only) to allow drinking on campus. There was not much partying at all, because the process to drink on campus was kind of a pain in the ass. It was to stop students from going off campus to clubs, where date rapes, car accidents, etc had happened because of it. It worked. I never saw instances of partying. It could be because of the general make-up of the school (generally straight-laced, "good kids" but all my friends drank socially), but I don't know. We also had no Greek system on campus. I do know a few hard-core Christian schools where you are severely restricted have very big underground party scenes (lots of drinking, lots of sex). Hearing about some of them made my eyes nearly bug out!

Anita18
09-10-2010, 06:05 AM
I think it depends on the student body as well. I knew quite a number of people who partied at my school, but it just involved friends drinking together and being social and playing loud music. Nothing toooo crazy. The craziest thing I heard was a classmate getting trashed, then thinking he needed to get a mohawk haircut, and then getting into a fistfight later. The first day back at class, he looked awfully interesting. :rofl:

But all of my friends only got more gregarious when they were drunk. They weren't any angry drunks. Or maybe I was just surrounded by good two-shoes like myself. :o

The engineering school was more known for the things they'd build for the parties, including a small wooden bridge for the annual foam party. :rofl: One of my classmates later transferred to Caltech, where he built a pretty good replica of the Bellagio fountains in the pool for a Vegas-themed party there. :rofl: I love engineers, they're awesome.

Lanie
09-10-2010, 06:39 AM
The engineering school was more known for the things they'd build for the parties, including a small wooden bridge for the annual foam party. :rofl: One of my classmates later transferred to Caltech, where he built a pretty good replica of the Bellagio fountains in the pool for a Vegas-themed party there. :rofl: I love engineers, they're awesome.

That is totally awesome! :rofl:

made_in_canada
09-10-2010, 08:04 AM
My perspective might be a little different coming from a fairly small Canadian university but I don't really think there's that much boozing to an extreme of ending up in the ER. People drink of course, and there are lots of student club sponsored bar nights and stuff but generally it's pretty tame. Mostly house parties and such. Most people are very good about not drinking and driving too. There was one student in res who pissed off a moose and had a bit of a scare but that's about it.

We don't have any greek system and while we sorta care about our sports teams we don't go crazy about them and they certainly aren't a huge portion of the university's budget.