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ArtisticFan
09-01-2010, 11:53 PM
I have had it in both feet from the abuse I heaped on my feet as a former dancer. One thing that has worked for me is icing. However, not just an ice pack.

My doctor suggested taking a bottle of wanter and emptying out about half of it. Then put it in the freezer and let the water turn to ice. Put the bottle on the floor and roll it with my foot for 20 minutes. It sounds stupid, but it does work.

Cheylana
09-02-2010, 08:51 PM
These are all fantastic suggestions. Again, thanks to all! :)

kathy sullivan
09-02-2010, 09:06 PM
I'd add one more suggestion. I had it and it was so amazingly painful. Tape, ace bandages to raise my arch, and ice helped a lot. I also got wind from my martial arts friends about a cream called Topricin. They said it worked wonders in some cases. Desperate, I tried it and it worked really well for me. You can buy it at most health food stores or online. Make sure you get the formula that advertises relief for plantar faciitis. I used it liberally and a lot - it is very comforting and feels it like you have ice on you feet when your just waking in shoes. I recovered in about 3 months almost completely. And had a lot of relief from it from the time I started using it. It seems to work best on the type caused by injury as opposed to the type associated with aging. Good luck.

bk_skates
09-02-2010, 10:28 PM
I'm a physiotherapist and have treated a few people with plantar fasciitis. If you can I'd recommend going to see a physio who can do some modalities (eg. ultrasound) on you to help get rid of the inflammation. They can also show you some exercises or how to tape your foot. I wouldn't run out and spend a ton of money on orthotics just yet. I've also had plantar fasciitis myself and I can walk around barefoot today.

As for treatment, you definitely want to start stretching your calves. You should do the runner's stretch where you lean into a wall with your arms and keep the back leg straight (which should be the painful one). Try doing 3 stretches with 30 second holds. You'll also want to repeat this exercise with a bent knee in the back leg in order to stretch the 2nd muscle in your calf. You should stretch 2-3 times/day.

Filling a bottle of water and freezing it is also highly recommended. Then roll the arch of your foot back and forth on it at the end of the day or if you've been on it for a long time. Put a can of soup or some other canned good beside your bed and roll your foot back and forth on it for 1-2 minutes in the morning before putting your feet on the floor. It helps to stretch out the tight tissues in the foot.

Another good exercise for the little muscles in your foot is to take a tea towel and lay it on the floor (tile or hardwood...carpet is too hard to work with). Sit in a chair and put your foot on one end of the towel. Keep your heel planted and use your toes to crunch up the towel under your foot. Do this a couple times.

Hope this helps!

Karina1974
09-03-2010, 12:16 AM
I've dealt with foot and ankle problems for a while in my right foot. Last winter my sore heel flared up into PF, and I spent the winter taking a break from the rigorous folk dancing and fitness walking that I did all last summer and winter. Taking a step on my right foot felt like I was stepping on a knife edge - a very dull knife edge. Stepping on those little metal strips they put on the floor in doorways especially killed.

Luckily, the pain really backed off in time for me to start up dancing again in April/early May, and I've been dancing ever since, 3 times a month since May. I have also biked almost 200 miles (avg. 20 miles/weekend) since the beginning of June.

The discomfort is back in the heel area, at the base of my Achilles tendon, where it's been very mildly sore for about 2 years now. It is at its worst when I get out of bed in the morning, but after a warm shower, I can walk without discomfort. I wear sneakers all of the time when I am out or at work, and nothing on my feet at home, and character shoes with 1.5" heels for contra/square dancing. Before the dances start, I can always be found standing in a corner of the room, doing heel raises and just standing in as high a releve position as I can get, which helps a lot. I can dance all night after that. :)

I'm curious as to the emphasis on using ice to treat this condition (or any condition involved strained ligaments/tendons/muscles for that matter). I use heat to treat any strains that occur. There's a reason why you warm up your body before performing any vigorous exercise, and why once you've been on your feet for a bit with PF it hurts less (like after standing in the lukewarm shower for several minutes); chilling an injury I would think would make the muscles/ligaments/tendons stiffen up and make it more painful, not less. Just yesterday I went out riding and mildly strained a muscle in my calf (you can feel it flex when you put your hand on the outer lower front of your lower leg and lift your toes off the floor). It hurt to put weight on it, so I wrapped a heating pad around it when I got home and, this morning, the pain was completely gone.

loopey
09-03-2010, 01:01 AM
Keep in mind that by "high heels", I believe that everyone means heels that are no higher than 2". The heel really helps if you have high or fallen arches.
I would suggest that folks check with their Dr. BEFORE deciding heels (even 2" will help). In some cases the inflammation of the fascia can put more pressure on the achilles tendon (especially if a bone spur has manifested). In these cases a "high" heel can help relieve some of the pressure. If this is not the case, a heel of even 2" can put MORE pressure on the fascia which is counter-productive to heeling. I would hate to think someone with plantar fasciitis is assuming "heels" is a good solution.



I'm curious as to the emphasis on using ice to treat this condition (or any condition involved strained ligaments/tendons/muscles for that matter). I use heat to treat any strains that occur. There's a reason why you warm up your body before performing any vigorous exercise, and why once you've been on your feet for a bit with PF it hurts less (like after standing in the lukewarm shower for several minutes); chilling an injury I would think would make the muscles/ligaments/tendons stiffen up and make it more painful, not less. Just yesterday I went out riding and mildly strained a muscle in my calf (you can feel it flex when you put your hand on the outer lower front of your lower leg and lift your toes off the floor). It hurt to put weight on it, so I wrapped a heating pad around it when I got home and, this morning, the pain was completely gone.The reason Dr's recommend rolling the ice bottle is because while the ice is helping reduce any inflammation, the rolling action is keeping the fascia loose. When you have plantar fasciitis, when you first wake up in the morning, or if you are inactive (off the feet) for more than 45 minutes, the fascia can tighten up and then when you stand up OUCH!. Some Dr's do recommend that patients alternate between heat and ice, but the stretching is really important either way.

dbny
09-04-2010, 01:44 AM
When you have plantar fasciitis, when you first wake up in the morning, or if you are inactive (off the feet) for more than 45 minutes, the fascia can tighten up and then when you stand up OUCH!.

Aha! I wondered what caused that. Thanks for the info!

Yazmeen
09-04-2010, 02:15 AM
I had it about 10 years ago not long after I started skating. I cannot emphasize enough as others did - before you get out of bed, do foot circles with both ankles and flex and point your feet - STRETCH!! Also, stretch both calves before you go to sleep. These exercise have become natural for me, I never get out of bed or go to sleep without doing these moves, and I've never had a recurrence since the first bout.

Another good site:

http://heelspurs.com/index.html

You can buy surgical tape in the drugstore to tape your foot. Best of luck, and I hope you feel better very soon!

bbtano
09-18-2010, 05:03 AM
As for treatment, you definitely want to start stretching your calves. You should do the runner's stretch where you lean into a wall with your arms and keep the back leg straight (which should be the painful one). Try doing 3 stretches with 30 second holds. You'll also want to repeat this exercise with a bent knee in the back leg in order to stretch the 2nd muscle in your calf. You should stretch 2-3 times/day.

I've had it off and on for about 10 years and stretching my calves has been the best treatment for me. I also got a pair of Birkenstock shoes to wear to work and they've been great. I've never stopped walking around the house barefoot, but I did stop wearing flip-flops and other shoes that don't have any heel/arch support.

I hope your pain subsides quickly! But if it doesn't, be patient and keep up with the stretching because it can sometimes take a few months to heal.

Lara
09-18-2010, 10:38 PM
After reading this thread, I'm pretty sure that's what I've had this month...pain and tightness by the achilles tendon that's worse in the morning. Ugh. :( (Medical school didn't really cover this condition and I never came across it in my two years of pediatrics.)

I'm guessing it was starting jogging that triggered it (or some combo of the sneakers and new sandals) and has finally started easing up. Thanks for all the input.

Cheylana
09-18-2010, 10:48 PM
I've had it off and on for about 10 years and stretching my calves has been the best treatment for me. I also got a pair of Birkenstock shoes to wear to work and they've been great. I've never stopped walking around the house barefoot, but I did stop wearing flip-flops and other shoes that don't have any heel/arch support.

I hope your pain subsides quickly! But if it doesn't, be patient and keep up with the stretching because it can sometimes take a few months to heal.
Thank you! I have definitely improved, although I still have work to do. I've been doing the foot and calf stretches and I try to roll my foot on a ball when I remember. I'm going for my orthotics fitting on Monday, so I'm hoping that gives me a little more relief too. I need to look into getting a pair of Birkenstocks, since it's getting such good reviews.

vesperholly
09-19-2010, 10:56 PM
Does plantar fasciitis include arch pain? Whatever tendon runs along the bottom of my foot from heel to the toe next to the big toe hurts like hell. My right foot has been in varying stages of swollen from mild to puff city for the past two weeks.

Cheylana
09-20-2010, 12:40 AM
Does plantar fasciitis include arch pain?
Yes, 100% yes! Unfortunately.

Whatever tendon runs along the bottom of my foot from heel to the toe next to the big toe hurts like hell. My right foot has been in varying stages of swollen from mild to puff city for the past two weeks.
I didn't have any pain in my toes, but definitely from the balls of the foot, through the arch, and into my heel. Mine was an acute case, it came on really suddenly and was really painful, but I think it's more typical for the pain to come on gradually. If it feels more painful when getting out of bed in the morning or when standing up after a long time of being seated, the odds of PF go up.

PF or no, you should consider letting a podiatrist take a look at it, especially if it's covered under your insurance plan.

slicekw
09-20-2010, 01:27 AM
I've had it in my left foot for as long as I can remember. As a kid, I would "pull" something on the bottom of my foot...it's the PF. The worst it was, I wore Birkenstock clogs for about 8 months, inside and out, and no other shoes. Shoes really do make all the difference.

Cheylana
11-04-2010, 05:51 PM
I had promised to provide an update, and it's been 2+ months since my injury, so now seemed like a good time.

With heavy knocking on wood :P I report that my left foot is actually feeling pretty good. I stretch both feet quite a bit before getting out of bed, but after an initial moment of achiness the foot is fine. I wear low-heeled shoes and boots and my sneakers with custom-made orthotics, and this has worked out pretty well. I still might get those Birkenstocks though....

I am back to doing yoga, but that's the only time I'm barefoot, and I'm careful not to do anything too risky (e.g., I won't hop in or out of chaturanga). I was told "no running" for three months, but honestly, I probably won't try running again until maybe next spring at the earliest... we'll see!

Once again, thanks to everyone for their wonderful suggestions, for which I remain truly grateful! :)