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ArtisticFan
08-28-2010, 03:29 AM
more likely you could have/had a kidney or bladder infection leading to passing of kidney stones accounting for the blood in urine and the still high white counts from fighting off the infection. I have explored that possibility. It is one of the reasons that I have seen a urologist for the past few years and recently changed to one closer to where I live. Because of the high white cell counts and blood in my urine, doctors have been quick to say that I have a UTI or kidney infection. However, when other results come back they tend to say that I didn't have an infection after all. I have had kidney stones in the past - trouble getting diagnosed with them too. I know the pain, but end up arguing to get it diagnosed because they tell me it is more than likely an infection rather than a stone.


Weight gain could be due to retaining water from recent improper kidney function or perhaps a diabetic issue or the thryroid condition, even the meds could be causing the weight gain are you sure you are not pregnant or even a tubular pregnancy or adding cysts considering your menstrual issues? I know I'm not pregnant. In addition to my birth control pills, my husband is working out of town currently. I haven't had enough energy to have an affair :) I've been tested for polycystic ovarian syndrome, but the results were negative. Numerous ultrasounds have not revealed an issue with cysts. I usually have one or two, but they disappear by the next test. I should clarify about my thyroid issues. My original PCP felt a goiter on my thyroid and ordered blood tests. They came back as normal, but because my father and nine of my cousins presented similarly, he went ahead and put me on thyroid meds. Subsequent doctors have run the same tests, which have come back normal, and kept me on the medication. I have never been given a reason that I have the symptoms but the tests say I should be normal. All of the doctors have just shrugged and said it is not a big deal.

Have you ever been tested for Lupus? Have you had blood clotting or heavy bleeding issues before? I have not been tested for Lupus. The blood clotting and heavy bleeding have started as new symptoms in the last 6-8 months. I have been getting nosebleeds that don't seem to want to stop and issues if I cut myself accidentally. I hadn't really put them together or thought about them until the incident with the IV. To be honest the others were annoying, but not something I was concerned about. The hand incident scared me quite a bit. They had already bandaged my hand and were guiding me out of the maze of the hospital when I looked down at my hand because it felt so warm. It seemed like there was blood everywhere. Someone helped me sit down and they all rushed toward me to clean up my hand and get the bleeding to stop, but all I kept doing was staring at it and thinking that this was not good.

Allskate
08-28-2010, 03:53 AM
I should clarify about my thyroid issues. My original PCP felt a goiter on my thyroid and ordered blood tests. They came back as normal, but because my father and nine of my cousins presented similarly, he went ahead and put me on thyroid meds. Subsequent doctors have run the same tests, which have come back normal, and kept me on the medication. I have never been given a reason that I have the symptoms but the tests say I should be normal. All of the doctors have just shrugged and said it is not a big deal.

From what I've learned, different tests and different labs have different cutoffs for what is considered "normal." Thyroid problems tend to be underdiagnosed partly because of this. Also, many of the best endocrinologists think that was is "normal" varies by person and that test results alone are not enough to rule out problems. A friend of mine saw one of the foremost expert endocrinologists. Her original tests/lab/doctor put her in borderline normal. He determined that her thyroid had been damaged by her radiation treatment, gave her meds, and she is now feeling much better. So, that's why a good endocrinologist who really knows thyroid issues is so important.

I hope you get answers and a solution soon. It sounds like you're at least headed in the right direction with all these doctors appointments.

Patsy
08-29-2010, 04:17 PM
Wondering if perhaps an internal medicine practitioner could help sort things out? Glad you're getting after things.

nubka, my condolences to you on your loss.

LilJen
08-29-2010, 05:11 PM
ArtisticFan, I thought of something else to keep an eye on. You didn't say whether you were still vomiting daily, but if you are, be very careful to rinse and brush your teeth often. TMI, perhaps, but vomit can really damage teeth (in fact some bulemics go undiagnosed until their dentists notice the damage from months or years of repeated vomiting).

Please take good care of yourself and I hope you get some answers soon.

Myskate
08-29-2010, 11:05 PM
I'm not a doctor either but have worked in a medical laboratory for 25 years running blood tests. When they check your white cell count and it is elevated, there should be a differential done also which will tell the Dr. what kind of white blood cells you have. Increased neutrophils are usually due to a bacterial infection. Abnormal lymphocytes can mean mononucleosis. Are your platelets decreased? This can cause the kind of bleeding you had.

Hopefully your hematologist will really look at your results and explain them to you. If you don't understand--ask. Don't let someone tell you not to worry about it. You already are. Good luck and hope you are well.

dbny
08-29-2010, 11:28 PM
Do it!! The thing I have learned in my limited contact w/ the medical world is that YOU have to be your own advocate & take charge of your own care.

I cannot agree strongly enough. Before seeing another doctor gather copies of all your relevant medical records so you can present them to whichever new doctors you see.


Great to hear you've gotten the ball rolling! :) Good luck!

ITA!

From personal experience, if you suspect cancer in any way, shape, or form, go to a specialist for that type of cancer. You should see a leukemia specialist in addition to the hematologist. Since you say you have a strong family history of leukemia, I urge you to find a reputable leukemia specialist at a major cancer center (if you don't know where to look, or whom to trust, go to the library and use "The Castle Connoly Guide to the Best Doctors in the xxxx Area"). This type of doctor usually does not see new patients prior to a diagnosis, but find the doctor, call the office and speak with someone there. Explain your situation (family history, symptoms, etc.) and ask if you can send your medical records with a request for an appointment. Write a cover letter explaining all. If you PM me, I will send you a copy of my own letter, which was reviewed by an MD friend of mine, and which got me the appointment I desperately needed.

Allskate
08-30-2010, 12:03 AM
I cannot agree strongly enough. Before seeing another doctor gather copies of all your relevant medical records so you can present them to whichever new doctors you see.

Definitely bring all your medical records. It can save you a lot of time and repeat visits and help the doctors. For example, you probably have an autoimmune disease that causes your thyroid problems. People with one autoimmune disease are much more likely to have another autoimmune disease. So, for the doctor who knows your medical history, other autoimmune disorders will be more suspect as a cause of your current symptoms, from vomiting to the blood and white cell issues.