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Prancer
08-26-2010, 01:48 AM
Piqua is up to 94.7. And Miamisburg has gone down to 97.9 which is only "efficient", compared to "excellent last year!!! Good grief.

:lol::lol::lol: I live in one of the districts that went from "Excellent with Distinction" to merely "Excellent." Heads. Will. Roll.

I'm glad to see Piqua doing better; maybe it will help some of the kids get outta there. I never lived in Piqua, but I did live near there for a while and most of the kids I knew then dropped out and got deeply involved with drugs. I still see a lot of that.


Nothing. Well, nothing for the supply lists. They are voluntary most places. I don't know about the fees as my kids never had that.

If we don't pay the general student fees, we don't get report cards. Everything else is voluntary.


Awe ok .

It's OUTRAGEOUSLY expensive, especially if they add in the DisneyWorld trip, which is almost $1000 more per kid. And it's not like they need that stuff.

But it is kinda nice when you show up at contests and everyone looks good.

Supply lists started trickling in from the high school teachers today. I was able to shop at home for most of it, but I'm going to have to stock up again.

Aceon6
08-26-2010, 01:56 AM
It's a pretty cheap way to keep super-expensive employees happy. I know one of the things that annoys me about my current job is how hard it is to get decent pens.

Can I bring you in for show and tell so you can speak to our admin? It's the little things that really tick me off, and not being able to get a college ruled notebook or a decent pen drives me crazy.

Back on topic, our district is cutting back on the lists this year per order of the parent advisory council. Teachers can put whatever they want on the list, but they've asked that the basic supply list be kept around $10 - couple of notebooks, a few pens and pencils, and the like. The art, music, and vocational supplies are more, but parents expect that.

agalisgv
08-26-2010, 02:20 AM
Speaking of supplies--don't know if it was nationwide or just here, but OfficeMax was selling 100 sheets of notebook paper for a penny. Ditto with folders--a penny each. Pens and pencils I *think* were fifteen cents for a pack. Three-ring binders were under a dollar with a third free for every two you bought.

Just thought I'd pass that on :cool:

FigureSpins
08-26-2010, 01:19 PM
I was just thinking about school fees and supplies because school started yesterday and already, I've had the annual hints and lists from the teachers.

Public schools don't expect the "we're too poor" and "we're too busy" and "we're too important" families to contribute anything. So they hit up the concerned parents (read: suckers) who don't mind parting with a few boxes of tissues the big Costco bundle they bought last month.

Classrooms during cold and flu season without tissues in stock are disgusting. Kids are gross and will spread germs everywhere without handy tissues in each classroom. *shudders* My kids definitely use more than two boxes a year (I usually send in a box/child every three months.)

Tissues are used for more than nose-blowing. Got gum? Wrap it up in a tissue and toss it. Spilled juice? Clean it up with a tissue and toss it. Hands sticky from lunch? Wipe them off with a tissue. Made an art project that's not dry yet? Tissues to protect it and your books! I buy the cheapest store brand possible for school. I also send in paper towels twice a year with some windex, to hint that they should clean the desks before the holidays.

I usually buy the 1 sale stuff and bundle it with my kids' leftover supplies from last year and send them into the homeroom teachers to use as spares. I got ticked off last year by something (rant lower down) so I'm not doing that this year. I bought the sale stuff and put it with the leftovers into my office supply closet for my own children to use instead. They have nice new stuff for this month, but when they run out, they can restock.

*rant alert* Last year, I sent the girls with a ream of paper for every teacher that had sent home handouts. All the teachers thanked us sincerely. The girls caught some virus and took turns being out sick for about two weeks, so there were a lot of makeup sheets to handle. (Because texbooks are too expensive and impersonal.) The Language Arts teacher, when asked, said extra copies were placed in a tray by the door for the students to be responsible and take as needed. Well, guess what? Those kids who came to school without looseleaf? They use the backs of those sheets as writing paper, according to two of my DD's friends. They help themselves everyday! No wonder all worksheet copies are gone by the next day and she still has students who didn't turn them in yet.

When they asked this teacher for an extra copy of one of the worksheets marked as "missing" on the progress report, the ***** had the audacity to say "I ain't got no extra paper or time to be makin' you copies." (Yes, Language Arts teacher talking like she's Stymie from the Little Rascals. :rolleyes: I asked each of the girls separately if she really said it that way.)

Disgusting, especially since we had given her the friggin' paper! I made a point of mentioning it during the parent:teacher conference and saying that, if she wasn't willing to provide that missing worksheet, the child's grade shouldn't be affected. It was waived when I repeated her reply to the girls.

The high horse I'm riding this year:
I sent an email to the Principal and asked that any worksheets used in class or for homework should be available online as pdfs, so that missing work can be made up more easily at home. I mentioned the lack of paper in the school for makeup work and how difficult it is to get extra copies. I didn't quote Stymie, though I was tempted. If she wasn't still at the school, I would have given her a parting shot.

DH and I both went to Catholic schools as children where we had a very specific school supply list, which every family was expected to fill and replenish on their own. The Mother's Guild events helped provide supplies for classrooms and for families who were down on their luck. Regardless, if you showed up on the first day of school without the proper number of black-and-white, 100-page, school ruled marble notebooks, look out! Your parents were getting a note or phone call.

I was astonished when I went to a public high school and my best friend's family, who were upper middle class, objected to having to buy looseleaf paper! The kids had all gone through public elem/intermediate schools and all supplies were paid for by the taxpayers! :wideeyes:

Private school families wuzrobbed! We not only pay the taxes that funded their supplies, we then paid for tuition and our supplies! (Then again, I was put into accelerated math and english in hs, so I guess you get what you pay for.)

All my daughters attended NYC private Catholic schools until we moved south. Not only did we pay approximately $300 in school fees and fundraising per year, every trip and activity had a price tag, and we had to buy specific school supplies. Plus, everyone was given a list of classroom supplies to send in: paper towels, tissues, window cleaner, etc. The specialty items like planners, protractors, compasses, templates, calculators, etc. were paid for by the school supply fees, so that everyone had the same thing. (It made it easier than the wasting classroom time trying to figure out how to do functions on 30 different calculators. Sure saved me the trouble of trying to find a TI-30 in stock and at a decent price.)

I think it's right to have the families of the students being educated paying for their tissues, paper, school supplies, etc. There are tons of "fill a backpack" charity programs that are willing to help out anonymously - Staples and Office Depot collect for them every year, as do the PTA and Churches. The taxpayers should pay for the schools, the teachers and office supplies. Just mho.

agalisgv
08-26-2010, 02:58 PM
^^^I appreciated your post above.

Just one point I would make:
Public schools don't expect the "we're too poor" and "we're too busy" and "we're too important" families to contribute anything. So they hit up the concerned parents I don't know that I would characterize low-income families as unconcerned parents.

Prancer
08-26-2010, 03:14 PM
Speaking of supplies--don't know if it was nationwide or just here, but OfficeMax was selling 100 sheets of notebook paper for a penny. Ditto with folders--a penny each. Pens and pencils I *think* were fifteen cents for a pack. Three-ring binders were under a dollar with a third free for every two you bought.

Just thought I'd pass that on :cool:

Thanks for the tip! You can go to the Office Max site and put in your zip code to find the local specials. I like sales like this for my shop-at-home store. And I still need those colored pencils for my son's English class.

Lara
08-26-2010, 05:50 PM
Trying to talk to parents can at times put you at risk. But PL is correct, in our state teachers and medical personnel are mandated reporters. Heck EVERYONE who suspects abuse, neglect or emotional distress are mandated reporters. Meaning, if I as a resident of the state observe anything that seems out of the ordinary, I am mandated to report it. But teachers, social workers, police officers, medical personnel are held to a higher standard.

Same in NY state - I had to complete a child abuse online course as part of my medical license application (two years of peds residency didn't count!) and they made that very clear.

Susan1
08-26-2010, 10:08 PM
You guys are going to love this............a lady I work with, whose son goes to a very affluent school district (which by the way just got Excellent with Distintion - woo hoo), called the school today beeeeeeeeecause her son came home with a note that said if he furnished "wipes" (Clorox? Lysol? whatever), he would get EXTRA CREDIT!!!!!!!!!!!! Is that not the stupidest thing you ever heard? Adding to a student's average for doing something totally non-grade, education or study-related. She called and told someone in the office, without mentioning her name or the teacher, just the 8th grade he is in. They said they would look into it. Can you imagine - "my grade can go from a C to a B because I brought in Lysol wipes."? Or "if I only would have brought in wipes, I would have gotten enough points to raise my grade."? Such incentive to study, huh? I think that's got to be bordering on illegal or something? Irresponsible?

PDilemma
08-26-2010, 10:13 PM
Such incentive to study, huh? I think that's got to be bordering on illegal or something? Irresponsible?

As a former high school teacher, I find it unethical and one more example of rampant grade inflation. But many parents are probably pleased as punch about the chance to inflate their kids' grades. If I had been paid an extra quarter for every parent who begged for free extra credit (as in giving points for no real work or extra study by the kid) for their kids in the 16 years I taught, I would be able to pay for my Master's degree in quarters on one lump sum. My favorite from the last couple of years was the woman whose daughter was sleeping through government class and still managing a B-. Mom wanted me to give her extra credit to bump her quarter grade up to an A because she was a Division I volleyball recruit and, therefore, deserved it.

Prancer
08-26-2010, 10:55 PM
You guys are going to love this............a lady I work with, whose son goes to a very affluent school district (which by the way just got Excellent with Distintion - woo hoo), called the school today beeeeeeeeecause her son came home with a note that said if he furnished "wipes" (Clorox? Lysol? whatever), he would get EXTRA CREDIT!!!!!!!!!!!! Is that not the stupidest thing you ever heard?

My kids get extra credit for bringing stuff in sometimes, too. It really makes no difference at all gradewise; there aren't enough points given to make a difference, certainly nothing even close to a whole letter grade. If it does make a difference, the overall grade is so close to the borderline that the grade would be rounded up anyway. I believe they get five points per item with a maximum of two items; most of their classes run to somewhere between 500-1000 points per term. Ten points is meaningless.

Susan1
08-27-2010, 12:23 AM
My kids get extra credit for bringing stuff in sometimes, too. It really makes no difference at all gradewise; there aren't enough points given to make a difference, certainly nothing even close to a whole letter grade. If it does make a difference, the overall grade is so close to the borderline that the grade would be rounded up anyway. I believe they get five points per item with a maximum of two items; most of their classes run to somewhere between 500-1000 points per term. Ten points is meaningless.

So what is the point of bribery if it doesn't make any difference? Maybe the could write a report about germs and earn points that way.

cruisin
08-27-2010, 12:27 AM
So what is the point of bribery if it doesn't make any difference? Maybe the could write a report about germs and earn points that way.

Oh! No! A whole generation of germophobes! :lol: I could give lessons :D

Prancer
08-27-2010, 12:34 AM
So what is the point of bribery if it doesn't make any difference? Maybe the could write a report about germs and earn points that way.

What would be the point of assigning a paper when what you want is wipes? :confused:

The extra credit is incentive to get the kids to remember; the lack of any substantial reward is a reflection of how unimportant the task is academically. Students don't tend to think of things in terms of percentages and value, and most don't understand that 10 points is essentially meaningless. And not just K-12 students, either. College students are the same way. I offer extra credit to all students because it makes the ones who need more work do more work, but I also make sure that the extra credit doesn't have a whole lot of impact on their grades. If a student is on the borderline and extra credit bumps them over, fine, but no one should see a whole letter grade's difference just because of extra credit, even if it's multiple extra credit assignments.

FigureSpins
08-27-2010, 02:09 AM
^^^I appreciated your post above.

Just one point I would make: I don't know that I would characterize low-income families as unconcerned parents.
I didn't say anything about low-income families being unconcerned. Perhaps you meant another post?

I said schools don't expect supplies from three groups, one of which is low-income. If they can't afford the supplies, they have be concerned enough to ask for help, right?

The others (busy and unconcerned) are two entirely different scenarios that the schools realize that they're fighting a losing battle trying to get them to provide supplies.


ITA that extra credit for supplies is ridiculous. At least make it points towards a "no homework" pass if you want to offer a reward. Maybe it was extra points on one assignment? That has such little impact on the overall grade, it's possible.

Prancer
08-27-2010, 03:41 AM
ITA that extra credit for supplies is ridiculous. At least make it points towards a "no homework" pass if you want to offer a reward. Maybe it was extra points on one assignment? That has such little impact on the overall grade, it's possible.

I don't know how it's done in the other district, but I believe they use the same grading software mine does; all extra credit is added in a category called Extra Credit and the points simply get added to the total overall. It is never applied to a particular assignment unless it is directly related to a particular assignment. But again, 10 points of extra credit in classes that have 500-1000 points per term has virtually no impact at all.

And I also have to point out that a school district that gets an Excellent with Distinction rating does not have a whole lot of kids who are just sliding by on unearned extra credit, as those ratings are based almost entirely on state assessments.