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cruisin
08-24-2010, 04:45 PM
That's why I said the ones who do pay for the therapies and such. But I'm in an area where there are folks who are using it as a money maker now. I have no issue with folks who get the SSI and put it towards the therapies and extra doctors fees, but many, many, many families I work with do not. They get the diagnosis for the cash, and do nothing for the child. Sadly, I've made several dyfs calls on behalf of the kids (for health/hygiene/care issues). Threatening to take the kid out of the house (and ergo the SSI check goes with them) seems to be what works.

That is so sad. The programs are there to help children in need, and the parents are abusing it. This kind of program abuse is what jacks up the cost of providing assistance and is part of why many object to the program's existence. It seems, though, with the situations you are describing that there is general negligence. Not just the parents trying to scam the system.

JumpinBug
08-24-2010, 05:02 PM
Some schools will withhold report cards, or keep students from activities if they don't pay fees. However, they also have programs to pay the fees if there's financial need. In schools around here, the extra fee helped to cover exploratory activities (art supplies, woodshop, etc.), agenda books, etc. It actually doesn't even cover one of those things, but $20 a student at least helps. But, someone launched legal action to block the fees, so now it cannot be charged. They said it should be paid by the government, which is nice, but instead the government cut funding, so the extra activities have had to restrict some of what they're doing.

I've requested kleenex... and it was a request only. Usually around 10 kids bring it in, and then I supplement to get us through the year. It may sound crazy to a parent reading the request, but a classroom goes through an incredible amount of kleenex, and everyone ends up using it at some point. That's it, though, everything else is for their own use - pencils, paper, gym strip, no sharesies. My school is good about buying supplies for teachers, but even with that I end up spending plenty of my own money. I also buy things for general student use (usually markers and pencil crayons in the markdown sales), and items for students that cannot afford things.

The most fun I've had was putting together an art bin for a special student... I think it cost me a day's pay, but seeing him use it was worth it. :)

Salome
08-24-2010, 05:45 PM
Sadly, I've made several dyfs calls on behalf of the kids (for health/hygiene/care issues). Threatening to take the kid out of the house (and ergo the SSI check goes with them) seems to be what works. Do you ever try talking to the parents first? Threatening to take someone's children away is no small thing.

PrincessLeppard
08-24-2010, 05:53 PM
Do you ever try talking to the parents first? Threatening to take someone's children away is no small thing.

Teachers are mandatory reporters of child abuse. If we suspect it (or neglect), we have to call.

numbers123
08-24-2010, 06:14 PM
Do you ever try talking to the parents first? Threatening to take someone's children away is no small thing.


Teachers are mandatory reporters of child abuse. If we suspect it (or neglect), we have to call.

Trying to talk to parents can at times put you at risk. But PL is correct, in our state teachers and medical personnel are mandated reporters. Heck EVERYONE who suspects abuse, neglect or emotional distress are mandated reporters. Meaning, if I as a resident of the state observe anything that seems out of the ordinary, I am mandated to report it. But teachers, social workers, police officers, medical personnel are held to a higher standard.

Salome
08-24-2010, 06:31 PM
Teachers are mandatory reporters of child abuse. Of course. The other poster didn't say abuse though. Health/hygiene/daily care aren't as cut and dry, so talking to a parent first wouldn't be inappropriate. If the mandated reporter has prejudices towards certain families because they seem to be scamming the system, I'd think using dyfs to threaten a family (that was the term used) would be not what was intended.

If you think there might be abuse happening, sure you make the call. But to me you don't do that to threaten people--you do that to protect a child. The whole threatening aspect seems troubling to me.

Aceon6
08-24-2010, 06:56 PM
Of course. The other poster didn't say abuse though. Health/hygiene/daily care aren't as cut and dry, so talking to a parent first wouldn't be inappropriate. If the mandated reporter has prejudices towards certain families because they seem to be scamming the system, I'd think using dyfs to threaten a family (that was the term used) would be not what was intended.

If you think there might be abuse happening, sure you make the call. But to me you don't do that to threaten people--you do that to protect a child. The whole threatening aspect seems troubling to me.

Actually, in our state, Massachusetts, anyone who works with children is required to report possible neglect as well, not just possible abuse. Lack of proper clothing for the season as well as poor hygiene are reportable.

As for talking with the parents first, that's a hard call. At my former hospital, the social workers would spend time with the parents to get a feel of their ability to provide. Some kids were clean, just not properly clothed. If the SW felt it was strictly a money issue, she'd refer them to an agency and get clothing vouchers for them. In other cases, it was clear that the parents weren't doing their jobs. Those, she'd report.

flutzilla1
08-24-2010, 07:02 PM
As far as personal supplies - paper/pens/pencils, absolutely they get provided by the families..

I'm not 100% sure about even this one anymore. For this year's 4th grade supplies, my son was told to bring in 5 different colored folders for each of his subjects, but not to have him put his name on them, because they would "help him put his name on the folders". This is the first time I'd ever seen this sort of thing on his supply list, and it sounded very, very suspicious to me, and since we bought him the nicer, more sturdy folders (his folders need to be sturdy as they tend to get a bit of a workout in his travels), we went ahead and put his name on them anyways. I don't think it would be fair at all for the families who pay the premium for more sturdy supplies to end up having all the supplies pooled so the child doesn't end up getting the stuff back that his or her parents paid extra money for.....

PDilemma
08-24-2010, 07:15 PM
I'm not 100% sure about even this one anymore. For this year's 4th grade supplies, my son was told to bring in 5 different colored folders for each of his subjects, but not to have him put his name on them, because they would "help him put his name on the folders". This is the first time I'd ever seen this sort of thing on his supply list, and it sounded very, very suspicious to me, and since we bought him the nicer, more sturdy folders (his folders need to be sturdy as they tend to get a bit of a workout in his travels), we went ahead and put his name on them anyways. I don't think it would be fair at all for the families who pay the premium for more sturdy supplies to end up having all the supplies pooled so the child doesn't end up getting the stuff back that his or her parents paid extra money for.....

It could also be seriously anal teachers who want every kid's name in the same place on the folders written in the same way. A lot of middle and elementary level teachers tell kids exactly how to do every single thing a certain specific way including how to write their names on their papers and supplies. Then when high school teachers get them in ninth grade, they drive us crazy if we don't give step by step extremely specific directions for every little thing. Some kids habitually leave their names off their assignments because "you never told us to put our names on it". And we are constantly asked "should I put my name on this?" As I banged my head over this, I would often hear the 6-7th language arts teacher next door saying very loudly "now we're going to put our names on the papers....".

cruisin
08-24-2010, 07:26 PM
Heck EVERYONE who suspects abuse, neglect or emotional distress are mandated reporters. Meaning, if I as a resident of the state observe anything that seems out of the ordinary, I am mandated to report it.

Yes, that is how it should be. Anyone who suspects that a child is being abused or neglected, should report it.

As to some of the items fees might be used for. Such as agendas, bluebooks, etc. I know that our PTA pays for that, for every grade level. The agendas are not just date books. They also have composition/math/language (English and foreign) guidelines. Behavioral expectations and rules. Club and other extra curricular information.

I do have one question re: bussing for field trips. Do sports teams (football, baseball, etc) pay for the school busses that take them to away games in most schools? If not, why should field trips require that? Unless it is a chartered bus, not a school bus.

genevieve
08-24-2010, 07:42 PM
I think it's been posted that the bus was chartered

Debbie S
08-24-2010, 07:52 PM
When I taught, one year I was given a gradebook, the other year I had to buy mine. The kids brought in their own supplies. The first year (middle school), I got some money for supplies for the classroom, but that offer was only good before school started (and I wasn't hired until a few days before teacher in-service week, but I got them to extend the time for me) and after that, we had to pay for whatever we bought. So things that seasoned teachers had that I didn't realize I needed until after school started (ink stamps, permanent markers, chart paper, some other stuff I can't remember), I had to buy....at the end of the year, I ended up keeping what I hadn't used - hey, it was mine....

The first day of school (this was 12 years ago), a couple of kids came in with kleenex boxes and handed them to me or put them on my desk - I had no idea school supply lists now include that and I was a bit puzzled as to why they were giving me their kleenex boxes - I asked one if he/she wanted to put their name on it and I remember the kids around me looking at me like I was crazy, lol. I assumed they were for each kid....later, another teacher explained that they bring them in for the classroom. :duh: :lol:

My second year teaching, I was at a different school and it was no problem for us to be reimbursed at any point during the school year for supplies. This was high school, so kids brought in their own stuff.


A lot of middle and elementary level teachers tell kids exactly how to do every single thing a certain specific way including how to write their names on their papers and supplies. The problem at my first school was that the principal and the parents were convinced that kids at that age needed to be told to do anything and everything. And if a kid did something wrong (an assignment done incorrectly, turned in late, called out/misbehaved in class), it was clearly the fault of the teacher for not explaining what they should have done. I would point out that I'd given out a list of instructions, went over them in class, asked for questions, the kids had 3 weeks to do the assignment - but still, the kid obviously didn't understand me and if they didn't ask a question, I must have been intimidating.

JumpinBug
08-24-2010, 08:04 PM
"I do have one question re: bussing for field trips. Do sports teams (football, baseball, etc) pay for the school busses that take them to away games in most schools? If not, why should field trips require that? Unless it is a chartered bus, not a school bus."

Where I'm at, teams pay for their buses. It can sometimes be covered by the PE department, but there's a charge for every single bus, and the users pay for it. Our PE department funds what they can, but for some things they do charge the kids $2 or what have you to help cover the cost.

Prancer
08-24-2010, 08:11 PM
I do have one question re: bussing for field trips. Do sports teams (football, baseball, etc) pay for the school busses that take them to away games in most schools? If not, why should field trips require that? Unless it is a chartered bus, not a school bus.

In our schools, yes, they do, as do all the other groups that use the school buses for transportation. It's included in the participation fee.

Today was the first day of school here. So far, I have to pay for but not track down :cheer2: supplies for mechanical drawing and I need to get a box of colored pencils for my son. Who is a junior. And needs it for English class.

Mine is not to reason why, mine is but to supply.

Everything else they either already have from past classes or can get from the two big drawers in my desk that I keep full of basic supplies. I expect there will be more as the week trudges on, but so far, not bad.

Myskate
08-24-2010, 10:39 PM
In my sons' high school there is $175.00 fee for every sport played, plus $45.00 for uniform upkeep. Yikes!!. If a team is over 30 students, the school will bus them to and from their event. If it is less than 30 students, the school will bus them to the event but the kids need to find their own rides home. This is awful when one of their matches is against a city 40 miles away from where we live. I guess that is better than the sports clubs. They have to come up with transportation, entry fees, sometimes hotels and still pay the $175.00 fee. I know my friend whose son is on the rowing team pays nearly $1,000.00 per year to subsidize him.