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Stefanie
08-23-2010, 07:52 PM
The only soup my son requests. I just made it last week :)

Olive Garden Pasta e Fagioli Soup (stolen from a Top Secret Recipes thread) :P



This sounds delicious, dbell! Thanks for sharing. :) Looking forward to making it on a Sunday as I'll have time.

cruisin
08-23-2010, 11:31 PM
Okay, I'm back with the ribollita recipe:

1 large red onion (chopped)
2 large carrots (diced)
2 stalks celery (diced)
4 medium potatoes (red or Yukon work best)(diced)
10 medium zucchini (diced)
11 oz. dried white beans (cannellini)
1 bunch Swiss chard (chopped)
1 savoy cabbage (shredded)
1 bunch kale (chopped)
2 leeks (julienned)
2-3 tbs tomato puree
2 day old Tuscan bread (torn into pieces)*
*If you don't have 2 day old bread, buy the Tuscan bread and cut into
chunks, put on a cookie sheet and out into a very low oven until it gets
"stale".

Prepare/soak the beans per package directions. Saute the onion in 1/4 up olive oil. When the onion becomes translucent, add the carrots, celery, potatoes, zucchini, and leeks. Let simmer until the vegetables have sweated out their juices. Then add the cabbage, chard, and kale. cover with water. Simmer, covered, for an hour. Add half of the beans whole. Mash the other half and add that. Add salt and pepper to taste and the tomato puree. Let simmer another 20 minutes, stirring frequently so that the bean puree doesn't stick to the bottom.

The rest can be done one of two ways:

1. The traditional way: Alternate layers of the bread and soup in an ovenwear casserole. Let it sit in the refrigerator over night. Heat in the oven ("re-boil" which is what ribollita means). It will be very thick, spoon into bowls, drizzle extra virgin olive oil on top and sprinkle with grated romano cheese.

2. The not traditional way, but it's faster: Tear the bread up into very small pieces and mix it into the soup (in the pot you cooked it in). Let it stand for 15 minutes or so until the bread absorbs the broth and is mushy. Then, as above, spoon into bowls, drizzle with EOO and sprinkle with cheese. It is even better the next day, and the next day or so.

If you plan to freeze it don't put potatoes in it (you really won't miss them). But potatoes get oddly soggy if they are frozen in soups.

rjblue
08-24-2010, 12:05 AM
rjblue's chowder:

2-3 strips of bacon finely chopped (or more if you are like me and love bacon)
2 med onions coarsely chopped
4 good size red potatoes
2 yukon gold (or other baking potato)- cut to 1/2 inch cubes
1 pkg frozen haddock fillet (one lb?)- chopped
1 can baby clams-drained
Coffee cream
butter

Put the bacon in your soup tureen and start to fry it over medium heat. Add the onions as soon as there is enough fat to keep the onions from sticking, and heat until they begin to be a bit translucent. Add the diced potatoes and cover with just enough water to barely cover them.

Cook over medium heat for about 10 min, and then add the chopped haddock.

After another 5 min or so add the clams (and any shrimp or scallops you have kicking around)

When the potatoes are done top off the broth with the coffee cream to make it rich, and several pats of butter.

The red potatoes will retain their shape, and the yukon gold will slough and thicken the chowder. I hate chowder that tastes like a white sauce thickened with flour.

I add salt and pepper at the table, because it seems better with the salt on top, and the bacon adds enough salt to the broth. I used to use celery or celery salt, but I find I like the simple fish and potato flavour better.

Serve with hot biscuits.

cruisin
08-24-2010, 12:21 AM
rjblue's chowder:...

I make a similar chowder with corn and some diced red peppers.

I don't love clams (texture), would the chowder work with just the haddock and some clam broth?

Holley Calmes
08-24-2010, 01:10 AM
I'm a slut for anything that uses bacon or salt pork as a flavoring :inavoid:.

This is why I love you. Me too. Bacon. We Southerners have a love affair with it (as I'm sure other regions do too.) My grandmother used to put the drippings from the breakfast bacon cooking in a container on top of the stove. She used this in her cornbread which she made every night, which was the most delicious cornbread I've ever had.

Bacon soup? I don't even eat pork other than bacon....but bacon soup sounds like something I could handle. How about a stuffed-potato soup with butter, bacon, chives? And lots of black pepper. Anybody?

rjblue
08-24-2010, 01:11 AM
I don't love clams (texture), would the chowder work with just the haddock and some clam broth?You can make it with any fish or seafood you like. It's so simple that most anything works.

FiveRinger
08-24-2010, 01:31 AM
I am fighting a summer cold. My solution has been wonton soup from my favorite Chinese restaurant. I eat it after I take my meds and fall right to sleep.


I've posted this before too but my favorite website for recipes is allrecipes.com. You can search by ingredients you want or don't want and they are grouped by category. Reviews are posted which is helpful.

I love this web site. They have lots of great soup recipes. Many of them are crock pot friendly, which, of course, is right up my alley!!!



A great weight loss plan is to substitute one of your meals with soup, keep your other meals reasonable, and cut out junk/snacks. I like soup because you can get tons of vitamins and nutrients at one shot and even hide some stuff you might not like too much.

Excellent tip--works, too.



This is why I love you. Me too. Bacon. We Southerners have a love affair with it (as I'm sure other regions do too.) My grandmother used to put the drippings from the breakfast bacon cooking in a container on top of the stove. She used this in her cornbread which she made every night, which was the most delicious cornbread I've ever had.


All of my grandparents are from the South, so I know exactly what you're talking about. Nothing substitutes for bacon. That turkey crap that they try to push off as bacon--should be illegal.

I have a cousin whose husband doesn't allow her to cook pork in the house (not for religious purposes, just doesn't like it). You should see it when she gets away from him. She eats everything on the hog from the rooter to the tooter when she's out of his presence! Definite deal breaker for me. Sorry.

Rex
08-24-2010, 02:38 AM
This is why I love you. Me too. Bacon. We Southerners have a love affair with it (as I'm sure other regions do too.) My grandmother used to put the drippings from the breakfast bacon cooking in a container on top of the stove. She used this in her cornbread which she made every night, which was the most delicious cornbread I've ever had.

Bacon soup? I don't even eat pork other than bacon....but bacon soup sounds like something I could handle. How about a stuffed-potato soup with butter, bacon, chives? And lots of black pepper. Anybody? I love most of the pig, save for the chitterlings, ears and feet.


I am fighting a summer cold. My solution has been wonton soup from my favorite Chinese restaurant. I eat it after I take my meds and fall right to sleep.Miso is good for what ails you too - I take it whenever I am having a cold or flu....


I have a cousin whose husband doesn't allow her to cook pork in the house (not for religious purposes, just doesn't like it). You should see it when she gets away from him. She eats everything on the hog from the rooter to the tooter when she's out of his presence! Definite deal breaker for me. Sorry.
Lips that hate swine, shall never touch mine :shuffle:.

shan
08-24-2010, 04:32 AM
I also like the knockoff of Wendy's Chili from topsecretrecipes.com. It's the only chili my kids like, even if they pick out the beans when I'm not watching. I've also made the Chili's Fajitas recipe from that site for a party and it was perfectly seasoned.

I love that recipe!! I make it every winter. :)

Japanfan
08-24-2010, 09:20 AM
One of my favourites is Greek Avgo-Lemono soup. First you make the chicken consomme. I usually use a whole chicken cooked in the slower cooker with wine, chicken broth, garlic, and celery (just a bit). This makes four-six cups of consomme and you add a few cups of orza and then blend three eggs or so into a bit of the hot broth before putting it in the pot. It's so yummy.

Another favourites is Thai soup made with chicken consomme, lemon grass, red curry paste and coconut milk. For this one I usually just make the broth from a few chicken breasts (skin on) because the other ingredients have so much flavour.

But my number one favourite is a beer/potato/smoked cheddar soup. I discovered this at an FSU lunch during the Olympics and experimented with it at home. I start off by boiling eight potatoes and a handful of onions in beer and chicken broth (half of each). Then I add sharp cheddar and two teaspoons of smoke flavouring. Lastly, I blend the whole soup in the food processor. It's so rich, thick and creamy that milk and flour aren't needed (as advised by some recipes).

Sorry I don't have more specific recipes - I always improvise as I go when I make soup.

Japanfan
08-24-2010, 09:28 AM
I wish I could trade with all of you in the heat for at least a few days! We have only seen a few nice days in summer this year. It has been mostly rain - but until now it has been warm. We were close to freezing the other night. :S THAT does not make me happy!


I've like to trade for some warmth as well. We are leaving Thursday for a one week camping trip on the west coast of Vancouver Island. We'll probably need to turn on the heater in our RV and be cooking curry or soup to warm up in the evening.

Aimless
08-24-2010, 03:46 PM
Creamy Gazpacho

This recipe appeared in Cooks Illustrated in June of this year. When I tasted it, I concluded that it was simply one of the best things I had ever made. I'm an accomplished cook with long and broad experience from sushi to tamales, so that's a big statement. I have craved it regularly through the summer, and last week I made it for the fifth time. The ingredients are unchanged from the original recipe but I simplified the technique ever so slightly, producing essentially the same soup with fewer dirty dishes resulting. Also, having tried both, I prefer a jalapeno to the hotter serrano chile that the original recipe suggested. The transformation that occurs in the blender is something to see! It becomes so creamy that you'd swear that there's dairy in it.

6 large tomatoes, cored (3 pounds)
1 small kirby cucumber, peeled & seeded
1 medium green pepper, cored & seeded
1 golfball sized red onion, finely minced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 jalapeno pepper, cored, seeded, and minced
2 tablespoons sherry vinegar, or red wine vinegar
ground black pepper
2 teaspoons salt, divided

1 slice good quality white sandwich bread
1/2 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons chopped parsley, basil, or chives


Coarsely chop four of the tomatoes, half of the cucumber and half of the green pepper. Place in a bowl and add the onion, the jalapeno, and the garlic. Toss with ground black pepper, 1 1/2 teaspoons of salt and the sherry vinegar.

Carefully dice the other two tomatoes, the rest of the cucumber, and the green pepper into neat 1/4 inch dice, and place these into a fine mesh strainer. Sprinkle remaining 1/2 teasp salt over them and mix gently. Place strainer over the coarsely chopped vegetables and allow to drain for one hour.

Put the fine diced vegetables into the container in which you will chill the gazpacho. Tear the bread into pieces and mix it into the now very juicy coarse chopped vegetables. Let it moisten and soften for a minute. In two batches, liquify the coarse chop in the blender on high for two full minutes, slowly drizzling half of the olive oil into each batch. The mixture will thicken, become creamy, and take on a rich orange color. Add to the container along with the chopped herbs and mix or shake well. Let chill overnight.

Truly, an astoundingly delicious soup. Much better than you can imagine. Flavor is complex and deep, texture is superb. Beautiful and irresistible. A killer first course, all ready in advance and easy to hand out in mugs or cups to guests who are standing around, or in pretty cups or bowls on the table, garnished with drizzle of EVOO or more herbs, chopped. Works fine with best quality winter tomatoes, but even better in the summer.

Holley Calmes
08-24-2010, 04:00 PM
Oh Aimless! I am sitting in a hotel room reading your recipe and dying to go home and make this. I adore gazpacho and this sounds wonderful. Thanks!

Garden Kitty
08-24-2010, 04:50 PM
There's a special soup my mom always made me when I was sick or on a cold winter's day, and I'm happy to share this family secret with you:

1. Open can of Campbell's chicken noodle soup and pour in pot
2. Add can of water to pot
3. Heat to boil.

For that extra homey touch, serve with saltines.

cruisin
08-24-2010, 04:57 PM
Here's a little tip for anyone who makes chicken soup, any version. Add a teaspoon or two of tomato paste to the broth. It gives it a wonderful flavor and a rich color.