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Capital_B
08-20-2010, 10:41 PM
How do you understand the phrase:

"They are all experienced translators. They all graduated."

Does it mean that they have all a university degree or even that they own a Dr.-title?

skatingfan5
08-20-2010, 10:44 PM
How do you understand the phrase:

"They are all experienced translators. They all graduated."

Does it mean that they have all a university degree or even that they own a Dr.-title?Hard to tell what those two sentences mean without knowing the context in which they originally appeared. Could you elaborate?

Nomad
08-20-2010, 10:45 PM
My interpretation is that they have at least a BA.

Capital_B
08-20-2010, 10:46 PM
Unfortunately not. Do you think that a native speaker wrote it?

Norlite
08-20-2010, 10:47 PM
They graduated from translator school?



:slinkaway

Capital_B
08-20-2010, 10:52 PM
Hm, I thought the same as Nomand, but my dictionary says graduated means having a PhD (Dr.). I am not an American or English native speaker. Are you, Nomad?

skatingfan5
08-20-2010, 10:54 PM
They graduated from translator school?
:slinkawayActually, without any context about who these translators are or what they will be translating or what type of institution they graduated, that is about the limits of what these two sentences would tell you -- that all of theses "experienced translators" had graduated/completed some kind of translation curriculum. There is nothing grammatically wrong with the two sentences, but in and of themselves, they really don't convey a lot of information.

genevieve
08-20-2010, 10:57 PM
I am a native english speaker and with no further context it could mean they graduted from: high school, college, a trade program, an online course. I suppose they could have graduated from a PhD program, but that would probably be the last thing I'd think of.

skatingfan5
08-20-2010, 10:57 PM
Hm, I thought the same as Nomand, but my dictionary says graduated means having a PhD (Dr.). I am not an American or English native speaker. Are you, Nomad?"Graduated" in the United States can merely mean completing your high school (secondary school) education. Or it could mean that one had received a bachelor's degree (4 years of college, usually) or any number of advanced degree programs beyond that. As I said, without more information about the context, it really could mean any number of things.

ETA: Just saw genevieve's post and I agree with her. Graduated = Ph.D. would be one of the last things I'd think of, although it obviously could mean that.

Capital_B
08-20-2010, 10:59 PM
But you don't mention university, Genevieve. Do you exclude this?

skatingfan5
08-20-2010, 11:03 PM
But you don't mention university, Genevieve. Do you exclude this?I'm not genevieve, but I'm pretty sure she isn't excluding "university." In the United States, most people use the term "college" to mean the same as "university." The distinction is that most "colleges" do not offer advanced degrees, but some do (e.g. Dartmouth College has graduate programs and even a professional program in medicine).

genevieve
08-20-2010, 11:07 PM
yeah, in general usage here college = university = undergraduate degree

Capital_B
08-20-2010, 11:15 PM
Okay, thank you! :)

bardtoob
08-21-2010, 01:59 AM
"They are all experienced translators. They all graduated."

I interpret this as meaning:

They = Experienced translators
They = Graduates

Being experienced translators is unrelated to graduating.
Being graduates is unrelated to being experienced translators.

A person can graduate from any kind of program if they enroll and complete the curriculum, including requirements for conduct and payment.

A person can be an experienced translator if they convert meaning in one language to analogous meaning in another language.

BigB08822
08-21-2010, 02:00 AM
I interpret it to mean they have at least a 4 year college degree. They may or may not have more than that.