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BlueRidge
08-18-2010, 03:10 PM
I wonder about this when I see people with their ears plugged constantly. This article is about kids, but my coworker listens to music all day and has it turned up so I can hear it a lot of the time, and I just wonder if she's messing up her hearing. It would be interesting to know if there are any studies on adults, and over longer time periods, though I guess its a more recent phenomenon that people listen so much with earbuds stuck in their ears.

Study: 1 in 5 US teenagers has slight hearing loss (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100818/ap_on_he_me/us_med_hearing_loss_teens)


CHICAGO – A stunning one in five teens has lost a little bit of hearing, and the problem has increased substantially in recent years, a new national study has found.

Some experts are urging teenagers to turn down the volume on their digital music players, suggesting loud music through earbuds may be to blame — although hard evidence is lacking. They warn that slight hearing loss can cause problems in school and set the stage for hearing aids in later life.

"Our hope is we can encourage people to be careful," said the study's senior author, Dr. Gary Curhan of Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston.

The researchers analyzed data on 12- to 19-year-olds from a nationwide health survey. They compared hearing loss in nearly 3,000 kids tested from 1988-94 to nearly 1,800 kids tested over 2005-06.

The prevalence of hearing loss increased from about 15 percent to 19.5 percent.

Most of the hearing loss was "slight," defined as inability to hear at 16 to 24 decibels — or sounds such as a whisper or rustling leaves. A teenager with slight hearing loss might not be able to hear water dripping or his mother whispering "good night."

I think there should be a lot more warning out there about this risk.

DickButtonFan
08-18-2010, 03:15 PM
I got an iPod last Christmas for the first time. So I went and listened to some music with my earphones in and when I was done noticed my ears hurt realllllllllllllllly bad. I didn't even have the volume up that high. I believe there's something really wrong with those earphones I don't like using them.

AYS
08-18-2010, 03:17 PM
I've never been able to use any of these earphone things, even back in the walkman days, due to pain in my ears.

Really
08-18-2010, 03:19 PM
When my students listen to music on their mp3's, I always tell them if I can hear it, it's way too loud.

The stupid thing is that their parents should realize the dangers because we were all warned about listening to music that was too loud. How many of us walked out of dance clubs with our hearing muffled and ears ringing from dancing too close to the speakers.

This isn't rocket science -- if you have something blasting in your ears for a significant amount of time, ear/headphones or not, you risk your hearing.

My ears physically hurt from the disk-like earbuds that came with my iPod, so I bought some buds that are more cylindrical, and I don't get sore ears. I'm also a lot wiser than I was when I was 20, and I keep the volume at a reasonable level -- so that I can still hear conversation around me.

BlueRidge
08-18-2010, 03:20 PM
I've never been able to stand any kind of ear phones or head phones.

I also don't know how people can walk around and ride the bus and stuff without being able to hear all that is going on around them.

bardtoob
08-18-2010, 03:45 PM
I still used those lightweight headband earphones with the fluffy pads or I used those ones that have similar ear pieces but actually slide onto the ear, but I do not use earbuds or anything that goes into my ear because they have always hurt my ears.

I was a musician of the more classically trained variety while growing up, so I preferred being able to hear the nuances of music, even if it was computer generated pop. Neither blasting it in my ears nor tuning out the world ever appealled to me.

PeterG
08-18-2010, 07:26 PM
I think there should be a lot more warning out there about this risk.

:confused:

Doesn't every single mp3 player (or portable DVD player, etc.) have a warning in it's manual? Every single one I have bought mentioned this. To set the volume at a level at home where you can hear it sufficiently, and when you are in louder places, do NOT turn up the volume as it will cause hearing damage.

I'm not sure there is anything more ANNOYING AND INCONSIDERATE than someone who plays music in ANY public space where someone else can hear that person's music. If those people end up deaf, it's completely at their own hands. And if they can't hear that semi-truck bearing down on them... Oh well. Stuff happens. (THAT is how irritating I find these people!!! :eek:)

BlueRidge
08-18-2010, 07:48 PM
:confused:

Doesn't every single mp3 player (or portable DVD player, etc.) have a warning in it's manual? Every single one I have bought mentioned this. To set the volume at a level at home where you can hear it sufficiently, and when you are in louder places, do NOT turn up the volume as it will cause hearing damage.

oh...

I don't have one so don't know, but I think it needs to be more talked about in the media. I just don't think people take it seriously enough.


I'm not sure there is anything more ANNOYING AND INCONSIDERATE than someone who plays music in ANY public space where someone else can hear that person's music.

well there are people who talk loudly on cell phones to give them a run for their money... :shuffle:

hydro
08-18-2010, 08:12 PM
oh...

I don't have one so don't know, but I think it needs to be more talked about in the media. I just don't think people take it seriously enough.


The EU has established guidelines for acceptable volume limits. Every audio player has to meet those requirements to be sold. The US does not have any such restrictions that I'm aware of.

skatingfan5
08-18-2010, 08:17 PM
well there are people who talk loudly on cell phones to give them a run for their money... :shuffle:That's why I carry foam earplugs with me -- and almost always am wearing the when I'm on the bus. There usually are at least two people carrying on VERY LOUD conversations on their cell phones (so as to be heard over the noisy bus sounds), often each in a different language. And surprisingly often one of them is sitting in the seat directly behind me. :mad: :lol: I still can hear them with the earplug in, but at least the sound is muffled down a few decibels.

BlueRidge
08-18-2010, 08:21 PM
The bus is the new phone booth...

skatingfan5
08-18-2010, 08:34 PM
The bus is the new phone booth...I liked the old phone booths better -- where one usually had it to oneself (http://www.loti.com/fifties_history/images/cramming1.jpg) for a PRIVATE conversation. What a quaint concept! Now it's sharing some extremely personal information with your very closest friend ... and another three dozen random strangers who happen to be riding the bus with you. :rolleyes: :lol:

PeterG
08-18-2010, 09:37 PM
I'm so old-fashioned...

To me, cell phones are for emergency situations or for private conversations in private places. I would never talk about personal matters where others might hear. It's so tacky...and tactless.

KatieC
08-18-2010, 11:21 PM
I agree about cell phones - I especially don't want to hear people arguing on them. As for ear buds, I only use my MP3 player when I'm away and don't have a radio to listen to at night. Then I used the ear phones and set the sleep function for ten or twenty minutes. Of course, I'd usually wake up at some point and unwrap the cord from around my neck!

Reuven
08-18-2010, 11:38 PM
That's why I carry foam earplugs with me -- and almost always am wearing the when I'm on the bus. There usually are at least two people carrying on VERY LOUD conversations on their cell phones (so as to be heard over the noisy bus sounds), often each in a different language. And surprisingly often one of them is sitting in the seat directly behind me. :mad: :lol: I still can hear them with the earplug in, but at least the sound is muffled down a few decibels.Ah yes. Cell Yell. Like the social worker I couldnít help over hear talking about a client, in a waiting area, at Logan Airport, with about 120 other people there, hearing every word she said.
Really is right, if someone else can hear your earphones, itís too loud.