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Aaron W
08-11-2010, 06:02 PM
U.K. tourism guide warns Canadians are sensitive (http://toronto.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20100811/canadians-sensitive-100811/20100811/?hub=TorontoNewHome)


Are Canadians easily offended? British tourism officials seem to think so.

New tourism guidelines for the 2012 London Olympics warn that Canadians can be overly sensitive, especially about their national identity.

Seeking to improve the sometimes frosty welcome on offer to tourists, VisitBritain has issued advice on how best to handle foreign visitors.

The advice says Canadian tourists are likely to be upset if mistaken for U.S. citizens.

Here's another article:

British tourism guide warns Canadians sensitive about national identity (http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5jJjEBY4F6U1dx9AXGV0nNMbDehCg)

Aceon6
08-11-2010, 06:22 PM
As a first generation American of a Canadian father, yes, it's true. Any why wouldn't they be? True, their GDP isn't on the level of the US, but they do have their sh!t together.

jeffisjeff
08-11-2010, 06:24 PM
:watch:

pat c
08-11-2010, 06:25 PM
I am hurt. :wuzrobbed; I am going to take my knitting needles and go and hide. ;)

Seriously? I think some are more annoyed than sensitive. (shrug)

danceronice
08-11-2010, 06:32 PM
Are Australians as offended when mistaken for British? Scots for Irish? (Never mind that last, that's a whopping great "yes".)

Norlite
08-11-2010, 06:50 PM
The advice says Canadian tourists are likely to be upset if mistaken for U.S. citizens.

Very true.

Winnipeg
08-11-2010, 06:57 PM
Hey, I take offense to that stereotype.................;);)

NeilJLeonard
08-11-2010, 06:58 PM
Very true.
Proof that they can't take a joke?

NJL

genegri
08-11-2010, 07:17 PM
Off topic, but from the same article:


Chinese visitors may be unimpressed by landmarks just a few hundred years old, tourism staff are told.

:rofl:

And it's so true! My mom was Chinese and she was never ever impressed by any "historical" landmarks in the US. :lol:

victorskid
08-11-2010, 07:51 PM
A typical question I've been asked on visit to the UK is "what part of America are you from?"

My response tends to be "I'm from the Canadian part of North America".

I don't consider it sensitivity as much as pride - I am Canadian :)

overedge
08-11-2010, 08:08 PM
[[sob]] My feelings are hurt. {[sniff]]

What I really laughed at in this story, though, was this part:

Indians are in general, an impatient lot, and like to be quickly attended to," the guidelines claim. "The more affluent they are, the more demanding and brusque they tend to be."

Gee, I wonder which colonializing empire the Indian culture learned this from :lol:

*Jen*
08-11-2010, 08:12 PM
Are Australians as offended when mistaken for British? Scots for Irish? (Never mind that last, that's a whopping great "yes".)

I'd say yes, because the accents are so vastly different, although I wouldn't be. Now Australians and New Zealanders, that's a little more serious. I'm not offended to be mistaken for a kiwi, but people in London tell me they've had their heads bitten off for being called Australian ;)

PeterG
08-11-2010, 08:33 PM
The advice says Canadian tourists are likely to be upset if mistaken for U.S. citizens.

Who wouldn't be offended if someone thought they were from the U.S.???

:P

Seriously though, when I was travelling throughout Europe in the 90's, I heard stories of how people from the U.S. would have sewn a Canadian flag on their backpacks because they got treated better if Europeans thought they were Canadian instead of American.

*Jen*
08-11-2010, 11:03 PM
This story goes further than advice about Canada :shuffle: http://www.smh.com.au/travel/travel-news/poms-not-an-aussie-insult-brits-told-20100812-1202c.html

TygerLily
08-12-2010, 12:40 AM
Canadians are sensitiveYup. :slinkaway