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my little pony
08-12-2010, 12:53 PM
If someone asks me if I am some particular nationality or ethnicity, I always say yes no matter what they guessed. I dont have time for extra discussion. The Indian guy at my 5 & 10 thinks I'm originally from Hong Kong. I have no idea where he got this idea but I let him run with it.

milanessa
08-12-2010, 12:56 PM
I dont have time for extra discussion.

Gotta get home to that ironing, huh?

my little pony
08-12-2010, 01:01 PM
Gotta get home to that ironing, huh?

someday I'm coming to Florida so you can mock my ironing fetish to my face, and also to take advantage of all those early bird specials

NeilJLeonard
08-12-2010, 01:10 PM
I don't understand the problem. If someone asks 'Are you American?' I say, no I'm from Canada. And that's not about anything except telling the truth. If I'm talking to someone for long enough that it comes up, then why shouldn't I tell them? I'm not offended, how on earth could I expect people in other countries to know? I wouldn't know how to tell all the accents in Europe apart, I wouldn't possibly expect them to be able to know ours either.

Best answer yet...:respec:

NJL (...possibly the best answer, period...;)...)

Squibble
08-12-2010, 03:45 PM
I try to blend into the culture of a city/country as much as possible and learn new things when I travel

There are Americans who do that too. But we don't get offended if someone thinks we're British or German. ;)


apologies in advance to all the Americans reading this, some American tourists (the ones you notice because they want to stand out) have a totally different attitude - I come from e greatest country in the world, bow down to the way I think things should be as I tell you about it loudly.

Stereotyping are we? So much for trying to learn new things when you travel! Haven't you noticed that quiet Canadians get mistaken for being American too?


Being sensitive and being an asshole aren't mutually exclusive. :shuffle:

:)


I don't understand the problem. If someone asks 'Are you American?' I say, no I'm from Canada. And that's not about anything except telling the truth. If I'm talking to someone for long enough that it comes up, then why shouldn't I tell them? I'm not offended, how on earth could I expect people in other countries to know? I wouldn't know how to tell all the accents in Europe apart, I wouldn't possibly expect them to be able to know ours either.

shells, I think I lurve you!

genegri
08-12-2010, 04:26 PM
I try to blend into the culture of a city/country as much as possible and learn new things when I travel while, apologies in advance to all the Americans reading this, some American tourists (the ones you notice because they want to stand out) have a totally different attitude - I come from the greatest country in the world, bow down to the way I think things should be as I tell you about it loudly.

I met one of those when I was in Europe. Nice lady from Texas (where else? ;)), but totally clueless. We were on a touring bus chatting away. First she told me she rode a train from London to Dublin. Then she proceeded to ask, nicely and enthusiastically, locals who have Americans relatives if those relatives felt "lifted by God and saw the light" when they were swearing into American citizenship. She appeared genuinely surprised when the Irish bus driver flatly said "no, not at all". :rofl:

When I told my Irish colleagues afterward, I was told "Yes, Americans are like that. We are used to it". :D Although in American's defense, that lady was the only one like that I met. Most Americans are pretty normal tourists like everyone else.

I really wished people would mistake me for Canadian.

withrespect
08-12-2010, 05:47 PM
Well that's not true in my case. I don't like being mistaken for American because I am so intensely proud to be Canadian.

ditto that!

sk8er1964
08-12-2010, 06:12 PM
I try to blend into the culture of a city/country as much as possible and learn new things when I travel while, apologies in advance to all the Americans reading this, some American tourists (the ones you notice because they want to stand out) have a totally different attitude - I come from the greatest country in the world, bow down to the way I think things should be as I tell you about it loudly.

As an American who lived in London for three years, I can assure you that this type of behavior is shown by people of many different nationalities, not just Americans. I saw all types on my daily commute to the West End. I'd even wager that some of them were Canadian. :P

timing
08-12-2010, 06:16 PM
I really wished people would mistake me for Canadian.
Many years ago I was. My brother and I were in a rose garden in Rapperswil. A couple (from America) heard us speaking English and came over to talk. They asked where we are from and my brother said Vermont. They then asked where in Canada was that :confused: My brother quickly replied that it was south of Montreal.

danceronice
08-12-2010, 06:22 PM
To be honest, I can hear the difference between most Aussie and Kiwi accents better than some Aussie and UK accents! (Of course, it probably makes me odd that I can differentiate pretty well between UK regional accents, enough to give an acquaintence from Blackburn crap about sounding like he's from Manchester, and can tell an Edinburough accent from Aberdeen.) Certain Australian accents are very similar to certain UK accents. Not to "native speakers", I'm sure, but to others.

The oddest ones are--"British" Northern Irish, which tends to sound vaguely Scottish but not quite to my ears (which I suppose should not be all that surprising), and just in terms of "Could you repeat that MUCH MORE SLOWLY" the worst for me is a certain class/area accent from Dublin.

As for traveling as a fake Canadian, the closest I've seen is when we were in Athens our wind ensemble members knew where the US, Canadian, and British embassies were located and which we were closest to at any given time (mostly "embassies of countries that are on good terms with US and speak English." As opposed to the first night, walking down a rather dark and forboding street and saying "Where are we anyway and why aren't there any Greek people? What is this building? 'Embassy of the People's Republic of Afghanistan'....crud. Is that the Iranian flag across the street?")

*Jen*
08-12-2010, 07:16 PM
As an American who lived in London for three years, I can assure you that this type of behavior is shown by people of many different nationalities, not just Americans. I saw all types on my daily commute to the West End. I'd even wager that some of them were Canadian. :P

I think we're more sensitive to the ones from our own countries. It really bothers me when I run into ignorant Australian tourists abroud. I guess I'm embarrassed :shuffle: But there are definitely ignorant ones from every single country in the world ;)


Certain Australian accents are very similar to certain UK accents. Not to "native speakers", I'm sure, but to others.


Generally not to native speakers at all, no. The thing about being an expat in a non-English speaking country is that I'm very sensitive to the subtle differences in accents, and can even tell different parts of Australia more easily now.

But I do confuse people with my own accent. It went from a soft Australian accent (nowhere near your stereotypical crodocile dundee one) to a downright wierd one very quickly once I left the country. I've been mistaken for British, Irish and NZ by Brits, Irish and Kiwis. It doesn't offend me at all - I'm kind of pleased not to have such a strong Australian accent. It really grates my ears after so much time away!

Nmsis
08-12-2010, 09:15 PM
As someone pointed out to me, "I'm sure people in the tourist industry aren't going to be rude to someone with money."
Actually, that kind of thought and / or attitude would be considered quite rude over here in France, and would be likely be met with a equivalent "raw" if not rude service. I mean, I don't work in the service industry but I would be really offended if someone made me understand that he/she had money and was expecting a good treatment from me because of that. That would really piss me, whatever his/her nationality.

So don't believe the theory to be true, because it sure isn't. :P
To me, it comes down to very different rules of politeness. We bring ours with us when we travel. But actually they are not everyone's.

Really
08-12-2010, 11:01 PM
I'm not 'offended' to be considered American, I'd just rather be considered what I am -- a proud Canadian. *shrug*

millyskate
08-13-2010, 12:03 AM
Actually, that kind of thought and / or attitude would be considered quite rude over here in France, and would be likely be met with a equivalent "raw" if not rude service. I mean, I don't work in the service industry but I would be really offended if someone made me understand that he/she had money and was expecting a good treatment from me because of that. That would really piss me, whatever his/her nationality.

So don't believe the theory to be true, because it sure isn't. :P
To me, it comes down to very different rules of politeness. We bring ours with us when we travel. But actually they are not everyone's.

Interesting observation. I've encountered people with money who come to France and just don't *get* that their cash won't buy them respect, or indeed good service, there... that a humble attitude is the only thing that works, irrespective of how much you have in your wallet.

As for the topic...
I work in the service industry.
And unfortunately, I must confirm that Canadian groups have the reputation for being difficult. In fact, our boss will only send the most experienced, service-orientated guides with the Canadian buses.

It is rather strange, because all my real-life Canadian friends are very pleasant, gracious and humble people who don't in the slightest have a sensitivity issue related to their nationality.

The first time I started wondering about the "Canadian sensitivity" issue was on FSU. Not to say all Canadians are hypersenstive, just that it appears to me more dangerous to criticize a Canadian skater in the skate Canada forum than it does to criticize a Russian skater in the Russian GP forum.

Starting work as a guide, I discovered that this impression of "needing to tread on eggshells" was shared by others.
In the service industry, generalisations are possible. The French-Italian bus isn't ALWAYS the last one to have all it's passengers on board, ready for departure, but over half the time, it is.
The Americans don't always tip in their own currency, but more often than not, they do.
The French ask the most "trying to sound intelligent but failing" questions (like "what is the power running in the high tension lines?"), the Scandinavians don't tip, the Japanese take many pictures, the Italians talk through the whole trip and systematically chose the front seat (and will actually steal the front seat from others when they have their backs turned)...
and yes, the Canadians are the only ones to tip by giving the guide pins of their national flag :lol: Some of my friends have quite a collection of them...

Bailey_
08-13-2010, 12:17 AM
That's funny because when I went on my tour of Europe, I was told to take pins and other Canadian souvenirs to give to people. I didn't...

I've been enjoying the discussion, recognizing that while each nation has their stereotypes - some people meet those stereotypes and others do not. For me, it's just kind of fun to think about differences between nations.

I am Canadian - don't say anything bad about my skaters, the Vancouver Olympic Games, and definitely don't call me American. And if you are from America - don't ask me if I live in an Igloo, or why I plug my car in (no, it's not electric), or tell me that I say "about" with my Canadian accent, and please have some idea of where I live when I tell you that I live just north of Minnesota. Thanks! I'm sorry for being so sensitive about this:)

Ha ha...