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nypanda
08-18-2010, 05:43 PM
I walk around New York a lot with my 5 year old. And there is not a day that she does not get pulled by me out of the path of a powerwalking, unaware, adult. Or run into. Think of it this way -- would it be okay for you to drive your car that way -- or do you stay pretty aware of your surroundings?

genevieve
08-18-2010, 05:59 PM
You folks wouldn't survive on a college campus! :lol:

I live in the middle of a multi-building private high school campus, whose main buildings are 3 blocks apart. I now know for a fact that teenagers just don't see adults, unless they are family members or someone in direct authority to them (aka teachers). At all. We are visually the same as the wah-wah-ing teacher sound in Peanuts :lol:

So yes, I am frequently driven off the sidewalk by adolescents who have no idea I exist, but also by plenty of adults who should know better :P

VIETgrlTerifa
08-18-2010, 06:56 PM
Sometimes when I work near the entrance of the store, I get to witness the way customers rudely run into each other at the doors. We have two doors at the entrance and it seems that it would be common sense to use the door on the right, that way people who are entering get one door and people who are exiting get another. I know that not everybody knows that, but it's funny when I see people exiting the store using the same door that someone is entering in, acting as if the person entering should hold the door for them. I also see the opposite happening a lot too, or people entering the store, stopping in the middle of the aisle to look around with a whole herd of people behind them having to work their way around.

It's especially funny when there's a cluster of people and one person entering or exiting opens a door and a whole line of people going the opposite way rushes through before the person opening the door gets to walk in or when there's one person who runs from the opposite side to take advantage of someone entering.

Karina1974
08-18-2010, 08:44 PM
I guess I'm thinking of when you are walking behind a group, but faster than they and you want to pass. A simple 'excuse me' isn't difficult.

Sometimes that doesn't even work. I cycle the Mohawk-Hudson Bikeway frequently and often encounter walkers who like to spread out across the entire trail. They should be walking single file to begin with. Some of them also don't seem to understand what "passing on your left" means either, or why I am ringing that bell attached to my handlebars as per NYS law.

Couples are the worst; it's like the relationship is threatened if, God forbid, they have to walk single-file. A few weeks ago I was trying to pass a couple on the right (she was walking on the left edge of the trail and he was next to her). I sounded my bell, and the guy moves over towards her and then moves back... before I'd even passed him! I almost went off of the trail, and he's lucky that it was not a point where there was a sloping drop-off or he would've gotten an earful once I had picked myself back up.

StonewshMullet
08-18-2010, 10:11 PM
Sometimes that doesn't even work. I cycle the Mohawk-Hudson Bikeway frequently and often encounter walkers who like to spread out across the entire trail. They should be walking single file to begin with. Some of them also don't seem to understand what "passing on your left" means either, or why I am ringing that bell attached to my handlebars as per NYS law.

Couples are the worst; it's like the relationship is threatened if, God forbid, they have to walk single-file. A few weeks ago I was trying to pass a couple on the right (she was walking on the left edge of the trail and he was next to her). I sounded my bell, and the guy moves over towards her and then moves back... before I'd even passed him! I almost went off of the trail, and he's lucky that it was not a point where there was a sloping drop-off or he would've gotten an earful once I had picked myself back up.


Same thing happened to a coworker of mine except he wasn't so lucky. He shattered his femer and will need at least 6 months of therapy to walk again, its was really really bad. He woke up in the hospital and was clueless, someone saw what happened and wrote down the plate number of the fleeing couple. Apparently the couple denied having anything to do with the accident, the only thing they were guilty of was bad manners. :mad: BTW, they didn't go off to one side, they split apart briefly and then joined hands again before he even passed and clotheslined him right off the bike. I think that's assault but I'm a bitter hag.

AragornElessar
08-19-2010, 01:24 AM
I just want to be sure I am understanding you. Are you blind? White Cane usually means that.

I am legally blind thanks to a degenerative eye disease. I have tunnel vision, w/a 10% field of view in my left eye and 15% in my right. What I do see, I see really well, but it's very limited.

kwanfan1818
08-21-2010, 10:54 AM
David Sedaris wrote an article in the 9 August issue of The New Yorker called "Standing By". Unfortunately, the full article isn't available online without a subscription; only the abstract is:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/08/09/100809fa_fact_sedaris

Towards the end he writes,


We're forever blaming the airline industry for turning us into monsters: it's the fault of the ticket agents, the baggage handlers, the slowpokes at the newsstands and the fast-food restaurants. But what if this is who we truly are, and the airport's just a forum that allows us to be our real selves, not just hateful but gloriously so?"

cruisin
08-21-2010, 03:09 PM
David Sedaris wrote an article in the 9 August issue of The New Yorker called "Standing By". Unfortunately, the full article isn't available online without a subscription; only the abstract is:

http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/08/09/100809fa_fact_sedaris

Towards the end he writes,

He raises a good point. I think, to some degree it is who we are. We (posters here) have given many examples of people we have seen behaving badly in stores and other places. I think the primary reason for why it becomes heightened with air travel is that we have a schedule and we are confined for long periods of time. Usually, we can avoid rude or ill behaved kids and adults in our lives by walking away. But, on a plane we cannot walk away. We either suffer the rudeness, put up with other's intrusive entitlement, or we stand up to it. Again, in most public places, we can walk away, get our table changed, do something non-confrontational. But, on a full plane, which has been delayed, where we are already stressed, when someone is glaringly overstepping your boundary and does not respond to polite requests to stop - people get mad.

I think there is some responsibility on the part of the airlines, the new baggage costs, the charging for every little thing. They probably could have avoided people getting angry about that if they just raised the ticket cost $25 - $35 and hid it. The other way that the airlines could make things better is if they were more forthcoming with their information. Don't say a plane will be ready to board in 20 minutes if it hasn't landed from the first leg of it's journey. Don't promise stand-by to someone if there are potentially 2 seats available and 15 people ahead of them.

I think our society has just become very "I need it now" and "It's all about me and what I need". It seems that we have lost the ability to consider other people and their space.

Yesterday, I was at the mall (took Mom to get an outfit for my niece's wedding - she looks really pretty in it :)). Anyway, we wanted coffee. Starbucks had a line out the door, so we went to Nordstroms coffee bar. There were only 2 people on line. I got on line and was there a minute or so. The line forms to the left of the cash register, so as not to get in the way of the tables. These two women are chatting and walk through the tables, right up to the cash register, completely ignoring the line. I said to the girl in front of me, did you see that? She said yes, guess they don't get that lines are for everyone, which the women heard (they looked at her and glared) and still didn't get on the back of the line. So the person behind the counter finished with the person he was helping, the girl in front of me paid for her water, and he turned to the two women and asked if he could help them. I said (politely), excuse me, but I'm next. He said no they were here first. I said no, I was on line, they came in after me. The two women glared (again) at me. He said (again) no they were here first. I said, I was here first, because I stood here and watched them cut the line, but you can do whatever you want. He took their orders, I walked out. I probably could have just waited, but I decided I would not give the business to this twit.

woodstock
08-21-2010, 03:21 PM
I work with children with disabilities. During one field trip to the mall we followed a man out the entry doors. I anticipated him to hold the door (at least until I could catch it and push my student in her wheelchair thru). I do that with folks pushing wheelchairs/strollers, in fact many people hold the door for folks to help them in those instances, saves them having to go thru the door in reverse. Instead he let it go right away and the door slammed against her feet and the front of her chair. Thankfully she wasn't hurt, but I was fuming at the rudeness. I bet he lets doors drops on people pushing strollers too!

cruisin
08-21-2010, 03:49 PM
I work with children with disabilities. During one field trip to the mall we followed a man out the entry doors. I anticipated him to hold the door (at least until I could catch it and push my student in her wheelchair thru). I do that with folks pushing wheelchairs/strollers, in fact many people hold the door for folks to help them in those instances, saves them having to go thru the door in reverse. Instead he let it go right away and the door slammed against her feet and the front of her chair. Thankfully she wasn't hurt, but I was fuming at the rudeness. I bet he lets doors drops on people pushing strollers too!

:mad: That really upsets me. The last two years of my Dad's life, we would use the mall wheelchairs, as he couldn't walk far, but he liked getting out, window shopping, and being around people. I was stunned at how disrespectful some people are toward handicapped persons. Cutting in front, not holding doors, etc. It's bad enough with strollers, but wheel chairs are more difficult to manage (especially if the passenger is heavy).

I put my Mom in a wheelchair, yesterday, she has COPD and has trouble breathing if she walks too far. There are a few ramps in the mall common areas (slight level changes). I approached one, going down, and there were a bunch of kids playing in it. I didn't want to start down with them there, because I was afraid I might not be able to stop it easily going down. I was surprised that the Mom saw us and immediately told her kids to get out of the way. Yay for that Mom.

I always hold doors for people, even ones who are not pushing anything. I will hold doors for people who are 10 feet away, that's how I was raised. I can't tell you how many people let me wait for them, holding the door, then don't say thank you. I just very sweetly say you're welcome and smile :D.

PDilemma
08-21-2010, 04:26 PM
Sometimes that doesn't even work. I cycle the Mohawk-Hudson Bikeway frequently and often encounter walkers who like to spread out across the entire trail. They should be walking single file to begin with. Some of them also don't seem to understand what "passing on your left" means either, or why I am ringing that bell attached to my handlebars as per NYS law.

Couples are the worst; it's like the relationship is threatened if, God forbid, they have to walk single-file. A few weeks ago I was trying to pass a couple on the right (she was walking on the left edge of the trail and he was next to her). I sounded my bell, and the guy moves over towards her and then moves back... before I'd even passed him! I almost went off of the trail, and he's lucky that it was not a point where there was a sloping drop-off or he would've gotten an earful once I had picked myself back up.

Your trails must be narrow! We bike our local trail (just did this morning) and often walk as well. We can walk side by side and still have room for bikes to pass on the left. And I know this is true because we have passed couples walking side by side when we're biking without a space problem as well.