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Civic
08-17-2010, 12:24 AM
I think anyone who's ever had to deal with the public on a daily basis empathizes with this man.
As I was working the reference desk today, I daydreamed about how I could make my headline-making exit....

Really? I would have thought things were calmer in Library Land. But I suppose that's a story for another thread.

shan
08-17-2010, 05:46 AM
My 3 1/2 year old nephew is left to his own devices by his overly indulgent parents. Recently at a fair as he was getting off a rollercoaster he turned around went into the no exit area and turned the coaster back on and almost killed 15 people. My sister-in-law tried to laugh it off but for once my family didn't let her off the hook. We told her that she needed to put that cell phone away or the next time someone will get seriously hurt. I can understand a person getting sick of a screaming kid and wanting to jumpt to safety or in this case slide.

:eek: How awful!! I'm assuming that no one was injured?

Gil-Galad
08-17-2010, 10:35 AM
I could be wrong, but my read is some are arguing for children to be sufficiently polite before being taken out in public, and Gil-Galad argues his/her parents let them out before then, and then let any bad behavior be corrected by strangers.

The first involves causing no upset to strangers, the second involves allowing strangers to be disciplinarians.

They seem like pretty different approaches to me...
That is correct - to some extend. But my Mum (Dad's a physician, wasn't that much in the picture) saw herself as part of the people we needed to get along with. So the first person that "taught" us not to interrupt people while they are talking, was of course her. She was pretty tough there. When she read us a story and we didn't stop talking or fidgeting - bye bye story. When we asked a question (and we asked a lot of them) but didn't really listen to the answer because of some distraction - she stopped answering.

When you didn't say "please" you simply didn't get the toy / food. You had to figure out on your own why not. Same goes for throwing things around, like food. The food was gone and the kid had to clean it up. When we went for a walk in the village, but couldn't keep calm it was "Apparently you don't want to go for a walk with me, let's go back." It was all action - reaction, from very early on. I think it's what kids understand. And by the time we were regularly in public, we kinda got the message.

Coco
08-17-2010, 01:54 PM
Are flight attendants able to give citations to people when they break laws on planes? I know if someone does something serious they will be arrested when the plane lands. But regarding the parent who took her child's seatbelt off in defiance, a nice ticket would have been in order there.

cruisin
08-17-2010, 03:09 PM
That is correct - to some extend. But my Mum (Dad's a physician, wasn't that much in the picture) saw herself as part of the people we needed to get along with. So the first person that "taught" us not to interrupt people while they are talking, was of course her. She was pretty tough there. When she read us a story and we didn't stop talking or fidgeting - bye bye story. When we asked a question (and we asked a lot of them) but didn't really listen to the answer because of some distraction - she stopped answering.

When you didn't say "please" you simply didn't get the toy / food. You had to figure out on your own why not. Same goes for throwing things around, like food. The food was gone and the kid had to clean it up. When we went for a walk in the village, but couldn't keep calm it was "Apparently you don't want to go for a walk with me, let's go back." It was all action - reaction, from very early on. I think it's what kids understand. And by the time we were regularly in public, we kinda got the message.

It seems that your Mother did exactly what most of us did. She prepared you, with consequences, for getting along in the world. But, there are times when children need to be told what to expect ahead of time. If a child has never been on a plane, they do not know what is expected of them. You cannot take them home, you cannot have them cleaning up thrown food if it's on other people or in their space. So, you put your child at a disadvantage if you do not explain that it will be a confined space for an extended period, and that they have to be on their best behavior.

StonewshMullet
08-17-2010, 04:11 PM
:eek: How awful!! I'm assuming that no one was injured?

Fortunately nobody was injured but about 15 people were less then a foot from being knocked down by moving cars. When they tried to go on another ride someone said told my SIL that they would prefer that my nephew not be allowed on anymore rides. She and my brother had the audacity to be annoyed. My Mother let them both have it, she said they had been too lazy to keep an eye on their son and he almost killed 15 people, they're lucky not to be sitting in jail. Were people always this entitled?

pinto
08-17-2010, 04:23 PM
Another scary example of danger by distraction by cell phone

cruisin
08-17-2010, 04:31 PM
Another scary example of danger by distraction by cell phone

And entitlement.

Karina1974
08-17-2010, 05:45 PM
I said, excuse me, lady, but apologize to her. The woman looked at me in shock. I said, how dare you speak to her that way, apologize. The woman starts sputtering and saying she's in a hurry. I said, I don't care if you're in a hurry, the girl does not deserve to be yelled at and called stupid. She did apologize, though not very sincerely. And afterward the manager came up to me and thanked me. In front of the cashier, so the cashier knew she wasn't in trouble.

:respec:

Bravo, cruisin! As someone who's done my time in customer service as a gas station attendant (cashier and Full Serve pumper), a bank teller, and still do as a receptionist for a steel company, I applaud you. I really wish more people would have the balls to speak up when they witness this kind of rudeness being perpetuated towards CS people who truly are doing the best job they can under the circumstances.

cruisin
08-17-2010, 05:58 PM
:respec:

Bravo, cruisin! As someone who's done my time in customer service as a gas station attendant (cashier and Full Serve pumper), a bank teller, and still do as a receptionist for a steel company, I applaud you. I really wish more people would have the balls to speak up when they witness this kind of rudeness being perpetuated towards CS people who truly are doing the best job they can under the circumstances.

Yes, I wish they would too. Especially since the CS person really can't defend themself. If the customer complains, they risk getting fired. The whole "customer is always right" thing, is wrong. Yes, the customer should be able to get what they want, but they have no right to treat the person helping them like they are beneath them.

I actually had another experience in that same grocery store. A man was at the deli counter and asked for (don't really remember the wight but...) 1lb of turkey. The woman behind the counter said, very politely, are you sure that is how much you want. they guy got snippy and said that's what I asked for, that's what I want. The woman said, yes, but for the last few days you've asked for a pound of something, then when I cut it you change your mind and only want 1/2 lb. And often that 1/2 pound that was cut gets thrown away. Well, they guy starts yelling at her and says he's getting the manager. He gets the manager and complains very loudly that the woman was rude and nasty to him and leaves. I waited and went to the manager and said the man was lying. That the woman at the counter was polite, did not raise her voice, and explained what happened. He said he was glad I stuck around, because then it would have been the customer's version against the employee's. Mine was objective. The woman is still working there, so I guess he believed me. ;) I've done that a few times where I've seen a CS person being treated badly, and I worried that they were going to have to deal with a complaint. I usually will give them my phone number and tell them that if the nasty customer complains that the manager should call me and I will tell them what happened.

lise
08-17-2010, 06:02 PM
Flight attendants have to put up with a lot and sometimes take it out on passengers. I remember in 2006 when I left for a trip, I barely made it out of my city because the flight attendant was verbally abusive to me. She was insulting me, refused to serve me ect. My brother is a pilot (but used to be an attendant) and I know how to behave on a plane. I'm always respectful. She felt that my carry-on luggage was too big and she wanted me to remove it and check it in. I did so, but she was still not happy. In the end, I ended up getting her name and reported her to the airline when I landed. I never do this, but she was exceedingly rude to me. The airline apologized and offered to give me a credit on my return flight with an upgrade.

cruisin
08-17-2010, 06:04 PM
It goes both ways. Service people are humans too. They are capable of behaving badly, just as the customers are. But, I must say, I see far more customers being abusive than being abused.

flyingsit
08-17-2010, 06:07 PM
The whole "customer is always right" thing, is wrong.

And not just when it comes to customer service people. I once told an HR rep that by promulgating that philosophy, they are also spreading the message that the employee is always wrong. Which is not a good way to engender loyalty among employees.

milanessa
08-17-2010, 06:22 PM
It goes both ways. Service people are humans too. They are capable of behaving badly, just as the customers are. But, I must say, I see far more customers being abusive than being abused.

Ah, but (IMO) flight attendants are different. I was one for 5 years. Granted it was in the Air Force (yes there is such an AF job) but one of the primary requirements is to be able to keep your cool. If you can't handle complaining/rude/snarky pax how can you be expected to react properly in a true emergency? After all, that's their main reason for being onboard.

BlueRidge
08-17-2010, 06:26 PM
And not just when it comes to customer service people. I once told an HR rep that by promulgating that philosophy, they are also spreading the message that the employee is always wrong. Which is not a good way to engender loyalty among employees.

That's not really the meaning of that phrase. It means you always treat the customer like they are right because telling them they are wrong doesn't really keep them as a customer. If you're doing customer service, it helps a whole lot to keep that in mind. But you always know that it really means, "the customer is always right even when he/she is wrong."