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taf2002
08-09-2010, 04:30 PM
Or maybe the child simply prefers doing other things, like playing with friends or something.

Would people say if the child wasn't into sports, then the parents must be sports haters and insufficiently cultivating the love of sports? Would people be pushing the child to love sports even if the motivation is coming from the parents instead of the child? It seems to me that many would advise allowing the child to develop their own interests instead of simply following the desires of the parent. I'm not sure why the advice is so different when the activity comes to reading :confused:.

Maybe it's because reading is key to so many other activities. A engineer or a computer tech or a math whiz is hampered in their careers if they are poor readers. Reading proficiency is necessary...reading for pleasure is not.

kwanfan1818
08-09-2010, 04:38 PM
I'm not sure why the advice is so different when the activity comes to reading :confused:.
There isn't any other activity that I can think of that can have such a dramatic impact on the ability to deal with school and to be able to get/search/seek and understand information. I think that there's an underlying fear of a child not doing well in school in the long-term if s/he doesn't show interest in reading.

I don't know what reading really looks like now, though, with computers, ebook readers, and multi-use devices being so prominent.

----
I think the reason I liked Nancy Drew so much was because the books were so formulaic, and I always was in a comfort zone, even if I was reading the part where she was locked in a closet or the basement.

made_in_canada
08-09-2010, 04:44 PM
Or maybe the child simply prefers doing other things, like playing with friends or something.

Would people say if the child wasn't into sports, then the parents must be sports haters and insufficiently cultivating the love of sports? Would people be pushing the child to love sports even if the motivation is coming from the parents instead of the child? It seems to me that many would advise allowing the child to develop their own interests instead of simply following the desires of the parent. I'm not sure why the advice is so different when the activity comes to reading :confused:.

At that age kids do what their parents do. While kids are developing their own interests they still are going to basically model their parents lifestyle. I read lots and participated in sports at that age because it's what my parents did and put value on. I have friends who are incredibly inactive because physical activity was never something done when they were growing up. Their parents weren't active so there was nothing to model.

agalisgv
08-09-2010, 04:49 PM
Reading proficiency is necessary...reading for pleasure is not.In this thread, it's been conceded the child is already proficient. So the only issue here is reading for pleasure.

I asked this before, but why are people so invested in children taking up a particular leisure activity, in this case reading? I take kwanfan1818's point about there perhaps being an underlying fear. But the sense that I am getting from some comments is that some adults really like reading, and think there's some fault involved if children don't share that. I'm just curious if people would feel the same if it was another leisure activity that was being pushed.

As an aside, I hear parents who are sports aficionados cite all sorts of reasons why sports is the key to lifelong happiness (eg. teaches kids how to compete, how to persevere, how to socialize, how to keep physically healthy, how to work in a team, the importance of delayed gratification, numbers and stats, etc.), so I don't know if that propensity is restricted to only reading aficionados. To me, though, they seem like very similar dynamics, but with different activities stressed.

Maybe there's more to it--I don't know.

*Jen*
08-09-2010, 09:06 PM
Teen books tend to deal with very intense subjects and I know of more than one person who has had Jen's experience. Books aimed at adults usually don't have as much impact for some reason; it might be because the adult books are so far removed from a child's experience. I don't know.


I had never though about that...I was reading adult's books long before I read my sister's teen one and none of them had a bad effect. Only the teen book had such a disturbing theme as to have me in tears and I largely skipped teen books because most of them do deal with difficult subject matter.

genevieve
08-09-2010, 09:17 PM
I asked this before, but why are people so invested in children taking up a particular leisure activity, in this case reading? I take kwanfan1818's point about there perhaps being an underlying fear. But the sense that I am getting from some comments is that some adults really like reading, and think there's some fault involved if children don't share that. I'm just curious if people would feel the same if it was another leisure activity that was being pushed.
You're right - a lot of posts are prioritizing reading as a value. I think families that value sports run into the same thing if their kid isn't into sports. It's one thing if the kid does not have aptitude (for reading, for sports, for music, for whatever), but in this case it's not about ability, it's about desire.

What I think people are picking up on is that the OP has decided that reading should have high value, but it doesn't feel like it really comes from within her (i.e. the whole family reads for pleasure and this child isn't interested, how to pique her interest). It feels instead that a high value has been placed on reading because of the school - and kids can pick up on that.

rjblue
08-10-2010, 03:25 AM
In this thread, it's been conceded the child is already proficient. So the only issue here is reading for pleasure.

I asked this before, but why are people so invested in children taking up a particular leisure activity, in this case reading? I take kwanfan1818's point about there perhaps being an underlying fear. But the sense that I am getting from some comments is that some adults really like reading, and think there's some fault involved if children don't share that. I'm just curious if people would feel the same if it was another leisure activity that was being pushed.
I spent a large part of my childhood with my nose in a book. I love to read and would often read through my entire waking time in the summer. It was sometimes really hard for people to draw my attention away from the book I was reading.

This carried on into my adult life and yet no one seemed to think it was a problem, or that I should interact more with people.

Then-along came the internet- and I transferred a portion of the time I had spent reading to participating in figure skating forums. Suddenly everyone in my family was concerned that I must be unhappy, and trying to escape my life by "being" on the internet.

I'm still mad at them. Everyone was happy when I was alone all the time with a book, and upset when I made friends with actual people on the internet.

So, although I and my children are avid readers, my perspective on your question is that reading as a leisure activity is of no more value than good quality video games, or much of what we use the internet for. And of less value than hobbies and activities that draw us into interaction with people and/or promote fitness.