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babbyrabbit
08-07-2010, 09:34 PM
For heaven's sake, at least stop her before she gets to Breaking Dawn. :scream:

Lol.. First of all she is enjoying the first half of twilight and Bella going to the new school ect. I am sure she wont last through the whole first book.

Secondly My sister told me to not even let her get to New Moon. THe movie was okay but she said the Book was not as ok.

However I may have to attempt Breaking Dawn, I cant wait till the movie comes out in 2012!

Auntie
08-08-2010, 12:43 PM
My daughter has always loved to read but we had a similar problem at school when her tested reading level greatly exceeded the books that were appropriate for her age level. Students took AR tests for class grades and were only supposed to read at their tested grade level or greater. Since she was in third grade and tested at a high school level, the teacher wisely dropped the requirement for my daughter. If it is an AR or required reading problem that you are having, take some time to talk to the teacher about the gap between her age and her reading level.

Please try to read to her at least a few times a week. Nothing is sweeter than laying in bed with your child and sharing a good book.

I loved to read so I made sure our house had filled bookshelves in the bedrooms, play room and living area. The books don't have to be brand new kid books - we had old textbooks, yard sale finds, free library books, etc. Many times I would find one of my daughters sitting in front of the shelves reading an old textbook or other non fiction book that I would have never expected them to be reading.

When my girls finally grew out of bedtime stories, we always let them read in bed past their bedtime. They loved it because they thought they were "cheating" bedtime. Most of the time they would read themselves to sleep in a few minutes.

Take trips to the book store and the library. My kids are teenagers and they still think book store trips and library trips are treats. (I do too!)

GarrAarghHrumph
08-08-2010, 03:44 PM
I actually HATE to read but her father is an avid reader!

...And ironically she has been begging me to read twilight :( Yes i know she is 6 but she has seen the first movie and everyone told me the first book was okay but prob not past that. lol.. And so i caved thinking well if she really wants to read it maybe she will. And she sat down and read for 40 minutes. Then ran to tell me everything that was happening in the book that didnt happen in the movie. Yikes.. Hope the book is ok like everyone is telling me!

For books that are above my daughter's typical age level re: subject matter, I read them first. Only if I think she should be exposed to them does she get to read them.

If nothing else, have your husband read this book. Then you can make a realistic judgement.

While I'm glad that she's taken an interest in a book, the subject matter in this one, IMO, is too old for her. I wouldn't want my six year old exposed to some of that.

*Jen*
08-08-2010, 04:39 PM
I agree. When I was 11 I read a book of my sister's which was aimed at much older teens. It really, REALLY upset me and turned me off reading for a while. It took all the pleasure out of it.

The girl is 6 - she can't judge what is and isn't appropriate. Beyond making sure that she didn't read any more of the books or see the films till she's about 12, I'd be inclined to stop her reading any further now and try some of the titles that others have suggested here.

I'm serious. One bad experience with a book could turn her off forever and I'm sure you don't want her to never read again.

PRlady
08-08-2010, 05:26 PM
I think the Twilight books are garbage. That said, I read way above grade level and wandered through the books in my house with no-one looking them over for age-appropriatness. Meaning I read Portnoy's Complaint at the age of nine. :yikes: I got through the whole first three chapters not understanding what the boy was doing. :o

A few years later my aunt caught me reading Myra Breckinridge, which I had borrowed from an uncle on the other side of the family. She took it away from me. I told him. He called her and they had a big fight which entertained me greatly, and I got the book back. Which I finished, not comprehending an awful lot of it, but quite mesmerized by Vidal's black humor.

I actually am an advocate of no censorship for reading -- as opposed to movies, which are much more vivid and difficult. Letting a child choose from a variety of reading means s/he can figure out which genres she likes and which are too adult (boring) and too childish (even more boring.)

But I know I'm in the minority on this.

made_in_canada
08-08-2010, 05:35 PM
When my girls finally grew out of bedtime stories, we always let them read in bed past their bedtime. They loved it because they thought they were "cheating" bedtime. Most of the time they would read themselves to sleep in a few minutes.


My parents did that too. Consequently, none of us can fall asleep without reading :D

michiruwater
08-08-2010, 06:08 PM
I'm with PRLady. At 10 I read the entirety of Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth series. I didn't get all the messages behind some of the more overtly sexual stuff, but I got through 6 or 7 novels of the series.

I always read way above my age in terms of both level alone and maturity level.

That said, Twilight is a terrible excuse for a series. Poorly-written and with truly disturbing underlying themes. If you want your daughter to think it's romantic for a guy to disable her vehicle to prevent her from hanging out with another guy and to watch her sleep at night without telling her, then go ahead.

numbers123
08-08-2010, 06:44 PM
I guess I am in the minority here, but a concern over reading at age 6 seems a bit dramatic. I currently read anywhere from 4 - 16 books a month. I don't remember being pushed to read anything other than simple books at age 6. Books that we consider appropriate reading for younger kids. Dr. Suess, weekly readers, maybe highlights.

When I was about 8 or 9, I began checking books out of the library, things like Nancy Drew, Cherry Ames, Bobbsey Twins. 10 -11 biographies - Amelia Earhart, Abe Lincoln, etc.

When I was in 8th grade, I found the romance novels portion of the library (why anyone would let me go there is beyond me) but I really didn't understand the underlying sexual content. Twilight books are not appropriate for 6 year olds in my opinion.

If elementary schools are pushing that hard for 6 year olds to read extensive chapter books, it is no wonder that many children give up reading for fun at an early age.

JMO of course.

Wyliefan
08-08-2010, 07:55 PM
I always loved books full of long hard words when I was a kid. I didn't care if I couldn't understand them all. I'd figure them out from context, or just read on without figuring them out. I just loved the sight and sound of them.

Prancer
08-09-2010, 06:44 AM
I actually am an advocate of no censorship for reading -- as opposed to movies, which are much more vivid and difficult. Letting a child choose from a variety of reading means s/he can figure out which genres she likes and which are too adult (boring) and too childish (even more boring.)

I mostly agree, but I make something of an exception for books aimed at teens, because:


I agree. When I was 11 I read a book of my sister's which was aimed at much older teens. It really, REALLY upset me and turned me off reading for a while. It took all the pleasure out of it.

Teen books tend to deal with very intense subjects and I know of more than one person who has had Jen's experience. Books aimed at adults usually don't have as much impact for some reason; it might be because the adult books are so far removed from a child's experience. I don't know.

I read a lot of old-fashioned books when I was little. I read stuff like A Girl of the Limberlost and Anne of Green Gables and What Katy Did and Nancy Drew. My Book House (http://www.amazon.com/My-Book-House-Volumes-1-12/dp/9990409455) and the Educator Classic Library (http://www.valerieslivingbooks.info/classics.htm) were big favorites and I think everything in those collections was challenging enough to read without being too adult. But I don't know if today's kids would like them; my childhood was pretty old-fashioned even for my time. I still have both those sets, and neither of my kids were very interested in them.

vesperholly
08-09-2010, 09:38 AM
When I was in elementary school (mid-1980s), I used to sit on a stool in the library by the window, reading the Dolch classics. They had a whole set of them, and they were on the bottom shelf. I have a copy of Famous Stories, a retelling of Arabian Nights. Looking at it now, it'll be the perfect book to read to kids at bedtime. The foreword says that the stories were rewritten ro use the "first thousand words" for children's reading, and the length is just right.

http://shop.ebay.com/?_from=R40&_trksid=m570&_nkw=stories+dolch

zaphyre14
08-09-2010, 01:56 PM
Seems to me that the child is just picking up on Mommy's dislike of reading. No matter what her skill level, if all she hears at home is that Mommy hates to read and she never sees Mommy pick up a book and read for enjoyment and she just keeps getting told that reading a book is something that she SHOULD do or HAS to do, like a chore of some kind, she's not going to like it.

My godchildren's mother was severely dyslexic to the point where she had to get audio versions of a lot of her college textbooks and reading for her was torture. Still when her kids were little she filled the house with books, left them everywhere (not neatly on a bookshelf or tucked away in boxes), and let the kids see "reading" and laughing. One of her favorite ploys was to sit with the book on her lap and when the kids came to ask for something, she'd say "Okay, just let me finish this part. I need to know what happens." Nine times out of ten, the kids would ask what was happening and they'd end up reading the book themselves.

A love of reading starts way before the actual point of learning HOW to read, IMO.

timing
08-09-2010, 03:54 PM
.. she just keeps getting told that reading a book is something that she SHOULD do or HAS to do, like a chore of some kind, she's not going to like it.

I agree so much with this. My oldest started reading in kindergarten. Students in her class were supposed to be read to for 20 minutes a day. Her teacher wanted her to read for 20 minutes since she could read. She started to see reading as something she had to do and it stopped being fun. So we went back to reading to her and reading went back to being fun.

My youngest was a different story. She was not interested in reading. She was not reading at grade level in school. She got very upset when she was supposed to read xx minutes a night. She still loved picture books. We kept exposing her to chapter books and waited. The Magic Tree House series was the one which got her reading regularly. She found other series, started reading a lot more and in a few years caught up to grade level for reading. Around the same time she caught up to grade level we noticed that one or the other of her eyes would turn out a lot. We had her vision tested and she went through a lot of vision therapy to help her focus issues. This made reading much easier for her.

So it is always good to have a child's eyes checked beyond the visual acuity check which is what is typically done in school vision screenings. School and pediatrician screenings had not picked up her vision issues.

agalisgv
08-09-2010, 04:09 PM
Seems to me that the child is just picking up on Mommy's dislike of reading. Or maybe the child simply prefers doing other things, like playing with friends or something.

Would people say if the child wasn't into sports, then the parents must be sports haters and insufficiently cultivating the love of sports? Would people be pushing the child to love sports even if the motivation is coming from the parents instead of the child? It seems to me that many would advise allowing the child to develop their own interests instead of simply following the desires of the parent. I'm not sure why the advice is so different when the activity comes to reading :confused:.

taf2002
08-09-2010, 04:28 PM
I think the Twilight books are garbage. That said, I read way above grade level and wandered through the books in my house with no-one looking them over for age-appropriatness. Meaning I read Portnoy's Complaint at the age of nine. :yikes: I got through the whole first three chapters not understanding what the boy was doing. :o

A few years later my aunt caught me reading Myra Breckinridge, which I had borrowed from an uncle on the other side of the family. She took it away from me. I told him. He called her and they had a big fight which entertained me greatly, and I got the book back. Which I finished, not comprehending an awful lot of it, but quite mesmerized by Vidal's black humor.

I actually am an advocate of no censorship for reading -- as opposed to movies, which are much more vivid and difficult. Letting a child choose from a variety of reading means s/he can figure out which genres she likes and which are too adult (boring) and too childish (even more boring.)

But I know I'm in the minority on this.

My reading wasn't really censored either but my parents didn't have anything in the house that had a sexual theme. They loved to read so there were books all over the house but they were things like Reader's Digest books or library books. I occasionally read something that was too mature but I don't think I was ever told not to read something. But there weren't things like the Twilight books around when I was a kid...the theme sounds like trash to me. I tried to read Interview with a Vampire a few years ago but I could get past the 3rd page.