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barbk
08-07-2010, 02:34 AM
I like the suggestions so far - read to her, get an eye exam -- but I wonder whether some of the issue might be that her reading skills are pushed out far beyond her emotional and maturity level -- just because a kid CAN read Harry Potter doesn't mean that Harry Potter is a good fit for where the child is maturity-wise.

I'd also continue to offer any kind of reading she might have an interest in, no matter how junky. D wasn't the most interested reader, and we spent a good chunk of first grade reading Magic Treehouse books - she'd read a page and then I'd read a page or two,... and I absolutely despise that series. (It may have been improved by now, but the first editions that we had were filled with grammatical and word choice errors that just made me cringe, especially from a publisher like Scholastic.)

overedge
08-07-2010, 02:38 AM
If she's six and she reads at a 5th grade level, she probably didn't get to that level without doing some additional reading beyond what six-year-olds usually do. And she wouldn't do additional reading if she hated it. However, if you push her to do it she may well end up hating it. Have the material there for her and let her do what *she* feels like doing.

ETA: It's also possible that if she is that far ahead in reading for her age group, she may be feeling out of place at school because of it, or even is being teased or bullied. If that's the case, pushing her to read may make her feel even more alienated.

fluorescein
08-07-2010, 02:51 AM
Just curious, but why is it important for children to like reading? If a child can read well, does it matter if they pursue it as an activity?

I was a voracious reader as a child and I think there is one skill that is difficult to develop without reading *a lot* - recognizing the difference between words that sound similar, but are spelled differently and have completely different meanings. An athlete has a training regimen, not regiment. A child who has been bitten will be wary of dogs, not weary. Those kinds of errors are like nails on a chalkboard to me, but I think I'm in the minority.

My DS has never read a book that wasn't assigned despite reading above grade level from an early age. Nothing I ever did encouraged him to read more. He dislikes reading/studying so much that he has chosen vocational training over college. It took me a long time to accept that just being mentally engaged was not enough for him. I wonder if an early dislike of reading may be an indication that a child is a kinetic learner.

I do like the idea of "cheating" on those elementary school reading assignments. How many kids are turned off from reading for years afterward because they weren't ready for it?

Prancer
08-07-2010, 03:12 AM
we spent a good chunk of first grade reading Magic Treehouse books - she'd read a page and then I'd read a page or two,... and I absolutely despise that series. (It may have been improved by now, but the first editions that we had were filled with grammatical and word choice errors that just made me cringe, especially from a publisher like Scholastic.)

:rofl: What I remember is that Jack's backpack seemed to get mentioned on every other page.

And who can EVER forget: The tree house started to spin. It spun faster and faster. Then everything was still. Absolutely still.


I wonder if an early dislike of reading may be an indication that a child is a kinetic learner.

I would think it would be very hard for a kinetic learner to sit and read.

Choupette
08-07-2010, 03:28 AM
It's funny, it never occured to me before reading this thread that reading as homework could undermine the joy of reading, but I've just realized it happened to me, in a way. I love reading and will read all kind of material, but will never read novels. Why? Every time we had to pick a book at school, I seemed to pick the most boring one, and I was stuck into reading it to the end and then write about it. That completely turned me off and I won't even try to get into a story anymore. On the rare occasions I do try, if I happen to like the book, I will have a hard time letting it go and will read it again and again, so it's not that I do not like this activity in itself. I would actually love to discover interesting novels but I'm too pessimistic to try.

babbyrabbit
08-07-2010, 04:54 AM
Thank you to everyone for all your replies!!

Reading is pushed very hard at school. And its all done by individual level. So they keep pushing them on to the next level not me.

I actually HATE to read but her father is an avid reader!

Ive bought every book series in hopes she would read it :) and nothing. Not without saying hey you need to read today. You always here that kids need to read 20 minutes a day. And that is what we are told from school as well.

She already has glasses (about 6 months). So that issue has been crossed.

I even found every kids chapter book on ice skating and ordered them! But still no interest in that..

I love the idea of magazines! Something as simple as that hadnt occured to me.

And ironically she has been begging me to read twilight :( Yes i know she is 6 but she has seen the first movie and everyone told me the first book was okay but prob not past that. lol.. And so i caved thinking well if she really wants to read it maybe she will. And she sat down and read for 40 minutes. Then ran to tell me everything that was happening in the book that didnt happen in the movie. Yikes.. Hope the book is ok like everyone is telling me!

dramagrrl
08-07-2010, 05:24 AM
A six-year-old should not be reading Twilight. (IMHO, no one should be reading Twilight. Terrible writing, terrible messages to impressionable young women, just overall awful in all ways.)

overedge
08-07-2010, 05:46 AM
Reading is pushed very hard at school. And its all done by individual level. So they keep pushing them on to the next level not me.

I actually HATE to read but her father is an avid reader!

Ive bought every book series in hopes she would read it :) and nothing. Not without saying hey you need to read today. You always here that kids need to read 20 minutes a day. And that is what we are told from school as well.


I don't exactly know from what you've said what the school is expecting of her, but it seems to me that pushing a six-year-old who is already reading at 5th grade level is excessive. When will "they" be satisfied? When she's reading graduate level university textbooks?

I understand pushing to get kids to read for a minimum amount of time each day if they are reluctant and/or resistant, because it's an important skill and a habit they should get into. But if she's already that advanced in skill with the reading she's doing, and she has a reading role model at home, maybe you need to have a discussion with the school so that you're both clear about what's expected of her and what amount of reading she enjoys doing.

ETA: Agreed about Twilight being a bit much for six year olds....

RockTheTassel
08-07-2010, 06:06 AM
A six-year-old should not be reading Twilight. (IMHO, no one should be reading Twilight. Terrible writing, terrible messages to impressionable young women, just overall awful in all ways.)

ITA. Not only is it poorly written, but it's too mature for a six-year-old. From what I've seen, many girls that age (and even older) who are into Twilight are often trying to grow up too fast.

But it's good that she's interested in something. Perhaps she'd enjoy some fantasy books that are written for younger kids?

screech
08-07-2010, 07:01 AM
Not really a suggestion for helping, but if she's 6 and reading at a 5th grade level, the issue with her not liking reading likely has nothing to do with the ability to phonetically read the words, but instead with the comprehension of them. She may be able to sound out words with ease but not always fully understand what she has just sounded out. That may lead to a dislike of reading.

I taught a grade 1 class a couple years ago and I had a student where I had to stop giving reading tests to him because he could read above a grade 5 level but when testing his comprehension on what he read he could not tell me, yet anything easier than that was done with 100% accuracy (not the level you want - there should be some improvement needed) and with full ability to explain what he was reading. He was easily frustrated with it, but I lucked out because he loved the Magic Tree House novels and we were able to work with those.

Prancer
08-07-2010, 10:43 AM
Not really a suggestion for helping, but if she's 6 and reading at a 5th grade level, the issue with her not liking reading likely has nothing to do with the ability to phonetically read the words, but instead with the comprehension of them. She may be able to sound out words with ease but not always fully understand what she has just sounded out. That may lead to a dislike of reading.

I think a lot of kids who read at an advanced grade level have that problem. The things written for their age group aren't challenging enough to interest them much, but things written at their verbal reading level are too mature in theme for them to understand. It all works out eventually.

I'm another "No" on Twilight. I'm sure she can read it; I just don't think she should. She can survive the bad writing (and probably finds the book very easy to read), but the themes are a little much for her age.

IvoryIris
08-07-2010, 11:54 AM
When I have 6/7 year olds reading at an advanced level, I encourage them to dig into the Children's Literature/ picture book genre. Caldecott award/honor books fit in this category.

They sometimes get missed in the push to get kids reading chapter books at an early age. The reading is typically set at about the 4th/5th grade level with the added bonus of wonderful age-appropriate stories, beautiful language, and gorgeous pictures.

I would choose a couple to read to her at bedtime. As time goes on move into partner reading with her. (She read a page, you read a page). PM me if you would like a list of authors.

Angelskates
08-07-2010, 04:31 PM
I think a lot of kids who read at an advanced grade level have that problem. The things written for their age group aren't challenging enough to interest them much, but things written at their verbal reading level are too mature in theme for them to understand. It all works out eventually.

ITA. This is a problem for older learners of English too. They often hate starting at the early "baby" levels, and there are not many books written for older students at a beginning level of English.


I'm another "No" on Twilight. I'm sure she can read it; I just don't think she should. She can survive the bad writing (and probably finds the book very easy to read), but the themes are a little much for her age.

Again, I agree. Though I would say the themes are way too mature for her age.

Wyliefan
08-07-2010, 05:19 PM
And ironically she has been begging me to read twilight :( Yes i know she is 6 but she has seen the first movie and everyone told me the first book was okay but prob not past that. lol.. And so i caved thinking well if she really wants to read it maybe she will. And she sat down and read for 40 minutes. Then ran to tell me everything that was happening in the book that didnt happen in the movie. Yikes.. Hope the book is ok like everyone is telling me!

For heaven's sake, at least stop her before she gets to Breaking Dawn. :scream:

Aceon6
08-07-2010, 05:49 PM
Another no for Twilight. I'd save it for 11/12 at the earliest.

As for the school, I'd be tempted to circle back with them and explain the situation. Due to their teaching and you're reinforcement, she's now reading at a level where it's next to impossible to find material that's age appropriate AND keeps her interested. Tell them you need an age appropriate/level appropriate reading list OR they need to back off.