PDA

View Full Version : Borscht Recipes?



Pages : [1] 2 3

Murdoch
08-03-2010, 05:44 PM
So, I have come into the good fortune of fresh beets from a friend's garden. FH is Ukrainian and LOVES Borscht. He is also sick as a dog right now... so, I was thinking that when he gets better, borscht might be a nice surprise.

Does anyone have a recipe they might be willing to share? He tends to prefer meatless ones, but I can adapt recipes. There are tonnes online, but I thought if someone had one they had tried, that would be even better! TIA!

emason
08-03-2010, 05:55 PM
I make the absolutely barebones borscht that my grandmother always made. Just scrub beets really, really well and cook covered with water in a deep pot. When beets are tender I hold them under cold running water and slip the peels off. I chunk up or slice the cooked beets and return them to the cooking water. To serve I put some of this is a bowl garnished with boiled potatoes and something acid/tangy - either a healthy squeeze of lemon juice or a swirl of sour cream. Garnish with chop dill if desired, and salt and pepper to taste (I usually don't use either).

Borscht is like meatloaf; you are not going to find two alike anywhere. Everyone's recipe is different. Good luck.

IceAlisa
08-03-2010, 05:56 PM
Borsch NOT borschT recipe: There is no "t" at the end of this word.

Ingredients:

3 beets
1/2 cabbage (I buy shredded cabbage from Trader Joe's cuz I am lazy!)
1 marrow bone (optional)
2-3 potatoes
1-2 grated carrots
3 tbl spoons tomato paste

Boil the marrow bone, drain. Boil again having washed the bone and the pot. Cut up the potatoes in bite sizes and drop in (Hint: if you want to make the beets more user friendly you can bake them a bit so they grate easier). Heat up olive oil in a skillet. Grate beets and carrots and add into skillet. Let this go for 5 minutes and add 2 table spoons lemon juice and 1/2 tbl spoon sugar. Add tomato paste.

Add all the veggies to the boiling water with the marrow bone and potatoes. Chop up the cabbage and add to the borsch and simmer for about 5 minutes until the cabbage is softened but still a little crunchy.

You can add onions and fresh herbs like parsley. I don't. I like to serve it with a tiny dollop of French mustard (very unorthodox) and a teaspoon of sour cream (very un-Kosher). It's a lot of manual labor unless you have a food processor that chops and grates.

Aimless
08-03-2010, 06:56 PM
I have a dynamite one, which I've adapted from the Victory Garden cookbook. I'll try to post it tomorrow. It's a bit labor intensive but makes an enormous amount, is hugely delicious, and powerfully nutritious with all the different vegetables incorporated. When I make it, I eat it for every meal until it's gone.

sk9tingfan
08-03-2010, 07:08 PM
Borsch NOT borschT recipe: There is no "t" at the end of this word.

Not necessarily. Please see the definition in Wikipedia. It is a variation. As an Ashkenazi Jew, I grew up with the "t" firmly planted on the end. Also went to High School with the heir to Gold's who makes borscht, otherwise known to me and my classmates as " The Horseradish King" ;)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borscht

Squibble
08-03-2010, 07:34 PM
Indeed. It's the Borscht Belt, not the Borsch Belt. ;)

IceAlisa
08-03-2010, 07:38 PM
Not necessarily. Please see the definition in Wikipedia. It is a variation. As an Ashkenazi Jew, I grew up with the "t" firmly planted on the end. Also went to High School with the heir to Gold's who makes borscht, otherwise known to me and my classmates as " The Horseradish King" ;)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borscht

It's a mispronunciation of the original word that does not have a "t". Believe me as I grew up in Ukraine and Russian was my first language.

Squibble
08-03-2010, 07:53 PM
It's a mispronunciation of the original word that does not have a "t". Believe me as I grew up in Ukraine and Russian was my first language.

Everything I have seen indicates that the standard Yiddish pronunciation has a "t" on the end, regardless of what the Ukrainian and Russian pronunciation might be.

Alisa, was anyone speaking Yiddish as a first (or second) language in the Ukraine and Russia when you were growing up?

IceAlisa
08-03-2010, 08:01 PM
Yes, grandparents on both sides spoke Yiddish and did not say "borscht". It is not, however an original Ashkenazi Jewish dish, or rather one that came to the US by way of Ashkenazi Jews, who in turn adopted it from Eastern European host countries. Somewhere along the way the "t" was added.

The Ukrainian and Russian pronunciations are the original ones, this is a Russian word, so can we please stop arguing? It's like telling me how to pronounce Domnina/Shabalin because everywhere in the US commentators pronounce it a certain way.

LordCirque
08-03-2010, 08:57 PM
My textbook for my Garde Manger class in Culinary School has a recipe for it, and has ingredients in it I've never seen in a typical recipe for it, probably because it's not easy to find them. The main one that stands out to me is Duck Stock/Broth. Is that a traditional ingredient in true Borsch?

IceAlisa
08-03-2010, 09:17 PM
emason is right when s/he says that there is no one recipe. I've never heard about duck stock as an ingredient but then my aunt likes to put bell peppers in her borsch so who knows? Sounds interesting.

LordCirque
08-03-2010, 09:19 PM
I'll PM you the full recipe when I get a chance. It very well could just be the text gourmeting up a traditional rustic dish.

sk9tingfan
08-03-2010, 09:56 PM
Yes, grandparents on both sides spoke Yiddish and did not say "borscht". It is not, however an original Ashkenazi Jewish dish, or rather one that came to the US by way of Ashkenazi Jews, who in turn adopted it from Eastern European host countries. Somewhere along the way the "t" was added. .

I guess my Russian born grandparents bastardized the language. I'm glad it was transported. Like bagels and bialys :D

IceAlisa
08-03-2010, 10:10 PM
I guess my Russian born grandparents bastardized the language. I'm glad it was transported. Like bagels and bialys :D

What are bialys?

sk9tingfan
08-03-2010, 10:25 PM
What are bialys?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bialy I ate them all the time as a child. They're softer and not as crusty as a bagel and have carmelized onions on top; yum.