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IceAlisa
08-03-2010, 10:27 PM
They look delicious. This is a Polish dish, no?

Cupid
08-04-2010, 12:17 AM
I have a dynamite one, which I've adapted from the Victory Garden cookbook. I'll try to post it tomorrow. It's a bit labor intensive but makes an enormous amount, is hugely delicious, and powerfully nutritious with all the different vegetables incorporated. When I make it, I eat it for every meal until it's gone.

Mmmm . . . can't wait!

emason
08-04-2010, 04:12 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borscht

If you look at the second picture down on the right in this article, this is a dead ringer for the borscht that I make. Not surprising, since this is the Lithuanian version, and my grandparents were originally from a small town outside of Vilna.

Squibble
08-04-2010, 05:27 AM
Murdoch, no recipes, but a little bit of inspiration:

Neil Young and Crazy Borscht (http://neilyoungandcrazyborscht.tumblr.com/)

:)

Marlowe
08-04-2010, 06:49 AM
I make the absolutely barebones borscht that my grandmother always made....Borscht is like meatloaf; you are not going to find two alike anywhere. Everyone's recipe is different. Good luck.

That sounds like what my mother (Polish) used to make. Unfortunately I never got the recipe. We also ate it hot and put mashed potatoes in it. And I LOVED it.

Regarding the question of Borscht and Borsch... we just called it *BEET SOUP*...

Thank you for this recipe emason. I've tried several more complicated recipes and none of them came close to Mom's.

pumba
08-04-2010, 08:45 AM
Yes, grandparents on both sides spoke Yiddish and did not say "borscht". It is not, however an original Ashkenazi Jewish dish, or rather one that came to the US by way of Ashkenazi Jews, who in turn adopted it from Eastern European host countries. Somewhere along the way the "t" was added.

The Ukrainian and Russian pronunciations are the original ones, this is a Russian word, so can we please stop arguing? It's like telling me how to pronounce Domnina/Shabalin because everywhere in the US commentators pronounce it a certain way.


This. Plus beet soup is not borsch, but svekol'nik.
Hmm despite +40C I'm thinking of cooking some borsch this weekend:P.

zhenya271
08-04-2010, 09:03 AM
Yes, grandparents on both sides spoke Yiddish and did not say "borscht". It is not, however an original Ashkenazi Jewish dish, or rather one that came to the US by way of Ashkenazi Jews, who in turn adopted it from Eastern European host countries. Somewhere along the way the "t" was added.

The Ukrainian and Russian pronunciations are the original ones, this is a Russian word, so can we please stop arguing? It's like telling me how to pronounce Domnina/Shabalin because everywhere in the US commentators pronounce it a certain way.

Can I just bring up one more variation? :) Wouldn't the literal transliteration be, "borshch"? Since the cyrillic word ends with the 'sh' with the tail - the letter that looks like a 'W' with a tail that equates to shch. Maybe the Yiddish variation came about due to the German transliteration/influence when recipes got passed down?

sk9tingfan
08-04-2010, 02:49 PM
My favorite version is the pure vegetarian beet borscht mixed with sour cream, served cold with a big hot boiled potato. Wonderful during a hot summer day!

Murdoch
08-04-2010, 03:33 PM
Thanks for the recipe!

Interesting discussion... fueled by Google search engine. The difference between typing in "Borsch recipe" and "Borscht recipe" is substantial!

emason
08-04-2010, 05:01 PM
My favorite version is the pure vegetarian beet borscht mixed with sour cream, served cold with a big hot boiled potato. Wonderful during a hot summer day!

The only version, so far as I am concerned.

IceAlisa
08-04-2010, 06:05 PM
Can I just bring up one more variation? :) Wouldn't the literal transliteration be, "borshch"? Since the cyrillic word ends with the 'sh' with the tail - the letter that looks like a 'W' with a tail that equates to shch. Maybe the Yiddish variation came about due to the German transliteration/influence when recipes got passed down?

Hmmm, I am having trouble with exact transliteration because the last letter and sound in the word борщ doesn't exist in English. As for Yiddish, I don't know the answer to that since I only know a few words.

Aimless
08-04-2010, 06:08 PM
Here it is, as promised. It is outstanding.

Borscht
Based on the recipe in the Victory Garden cookbook, the best vegetable cookbook I know. This recipe is made in two parts. It's messy but you end up with a huge amount and I think it must be very nutritious with all those veggies. Amounts of the vegetable ingredients below are flexible plus or minus. It is served cold, traditionally accompanied by hearty black bread with sweet butter.
Part one:
1 large onion, chopped, 2 cups chopped fresh tomatoes
2 stalks celery, sliced, 2 cups peeled potatoes, chopped
2 medium beets,chopped, 3 cans beef broth (I use College Inn, 14oz cans)
2 cloves garlic, black pepper, chopped fresh parsley, 1 teasp salt
4 cups water, 2 Tablespoons vegetable oil
In very large soup pot, saute the onion and celery in 2 tablespoons vegetable oil until softened and browning. Add all other ingredients and simmer slowly for 30-45 minutes until tender. Blend briefly in blender or food processor. Don't overblend, it should be a thick puree. Return it to the pot. Meanwhile:
Part two:
2 cups shredded beets, Juice of 1 1/2 lemons
1 cup shredded carrot, 2 cups reduced fat sour cream
3 cups shredded cabbage, Garnish: more sour cream, snipped fresh dill
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
Saute the beets, carrot and cabbage slowly in oil in a large skillet until softened, mellow, fragrant and starting to brown. Add these to the soup base when it goes back in the pot. Simmer briefly until vegetables are barely tender. Keep the burner low to preserve the shocking red color. The vegetables will keep cooking for quite a while after you take that huge pot off the heat. Add the lemon juice and chill overnight in the refrigerator.
When ready to serve, whisk the sour cream to liquify it, the mix a few ladles of soup into it. When this is smooth, mix it into the big soup pot. This makes the final product smoother. Correct the seasoning and add more lemon juice if desired. Serve in big bowls with another dollop of sour cream and snipped dill as garnish.

IceAlisa
08-04-2010, 06:10 PM
Aimless brought up something important: regardless of your borshch recipe, tradition has it that it always tastes better the day after you make it. So make it the day before and let it rest in the fridge so the flavors can marry. :swoon:

zhenya271
08-05-2010, 03:41 AM
Hmmm, I am having trouble with exact transliteration because the last letter and sound in the word борщ doesn't exist in English. As for Yiddish, I don't know the answer to that since I only know a few words.

That letter is troublesome, it's supposed to sound like the 'sh' and ch' in fresh cheese, but actually getting that result is not that easy, at least, I don't think so.

These recipes sound so good, but the heat index is around 100 degrees here, so I think I'll wait for some cooler weather.:(

Murdoch
08-05-2010, 02:56 PM
Thank you, Aimless! It does sound a little labor intensive - but yummy!!