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overedge
07-29-2010, 10:11 PM
And some of these schools LIE, LIE, LIE to students. Not all of them; in fact, one local proprietary school now has a legible warning right in their commercialsthat credits earned there might not transfer to other schools. But a lot of them LIE.

Or are, shall we say, "economical with the truth". As in saying that their courses are eligible for transfer to other schools/programs. Which is true in that most schools will *look* at requests for transfer from many sources. But not true in that there are some schools where the request will pretty much be automatically declined just because of the school the course was taken it.

lash
07-30-2010, 02:20 AM
Frontline did a documentary on just this. Very eye opening.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/collegeinc/view/

michiruwater
07-30-2010, 02:22 AM
How is it that UoP is accredited? I really never understood that.

Prancer
07-30-2010, 02:49 AM
How is it that UoP is accredited? I really never understood that.

Are you asking how schools get accreditation in general or how UoP gets it?

UoP gets accredited the same way everyone else does; it applies, there is a review and, if standards are met, accreditation is granted.

UoP has regional accreditation, which is the most basic level of accreditation you want to see in a college. No matter what people may read on the internet, national accreditation is NOT just as good or better.

What UoP doesn't have is a lot of program accreditation, which is much harder to get and much more desirable in terms of a school's reputation and credibility. They do have some program accreditation, though.

I really don't know anything about the quality of UoP curriculum, so I can't say anything about that, but I will say that I think a lot of the negative image UoP has comes from things other than strict academics--aggressive recruiting, very poor graduation rates, mostly part-time faculty and a refusal to report student success or lack thereof have all contributed a lot. UoP also had an established bad reputation before other schools started offering online classes, which hasn't helped.

But I don't know anything at all about the courses they offer. I would, however, think that they were about on par with a lot of lower level brick and mortar schools.

An interesting article about UoP and, to some extent, for-profit schools: http://reason.com/archives/2008/07/03/education-for-profit

GarrAarghHrumph
07-30-2010, 03:14 AM
One thing that I do think U of P does well is student writing, in terms of really helping students learn to write better than when they enter, and in incorporating the mechanics and content of writing throughout their curriculum. I've found student writing out of U of P to be, on average, much better than the student writing I've seen out of lower level brick and mortar colleges.

As for the quality of the courses - IMO, they're on par with classes offered at other lower-tier colleges. Some are actually better, but it really varies by instructor.

I also think that part of what goes into U of P's rep, in addition to what Prancer noted, is that they are, at least academically, open admissions. So long as you're a working adult, you will get in. That means that some students come in ill-prepared for college work. In general, I think that any school that's open admissions tends to get a not-so-great rep, just by being open admissions.

overedge
07-30-2010, 03:47 AM
One thing that I do think U of P does well is student writing, in terms of really helping students learn to write better than when they enter, and in incorporating the mechanics and content of writing throughout their curriculum. I've found student writing out of U of P to be, on average, much better than the student writing I've seen out of lower level brick and mortar colleges.


:eek: Well, then, I would hate to see that writing from the lower level brick and mortar colleges. Because I have had the exact opposite experience with former U of P students.

Prancer
07-30-2010, 03:57 AM
One thing that I do think U of P does well is student writing, in terms of really helping students learn to write better than when they enter, and in incorporating the mechanics and content of writing throughout their curriculum. I've found student writing out of U of P to be, on average, much better than the student writing I've seen out of lower level brick and mortar colleges.

Oooh, is this writing they show you that they've done at UoP, or is this stuff they write afterward?

Because I do know something about UoP and writing, and if you are talking about things they've written for class there, I wouldn't count it :shuffle:


I also think that part of what goes into U of P's rep, in addition to what Prancer noted, is that they are, at least academically, open admissions. So long as you're a working adult, you will get in. That means that some students come in ill-prepared for college work. In general, I think that any school that's open admissions tends to get a not-so-great rep, just by being open admissions.

Yes, I think community colleges and state universities (to some degree) get a bad rap for the same reason. And any school that has open admissions AND any kind of academic standard is going to have a low student success rate, which is going to affect the school's reputation and ranking.

DickButtonFan
07-30-2010, 05:50 AM
I knew someone that went to u o p and saw their class... it was a message board where they just wrote a paragraph for their assignments, really basic type questions. I know not all classes are prob like that but still I thought it was ridiculous.

manhn
07-30-2010, 05:53 AM
My university that I attended for undergrad was atop a mountain, which was a @&HS!@ to get to everyday. My university expanded after I graduated. They now have a campus in a suburban mall and I would've LOVED to attend. The food's better, it's easier to get to, easier to find parking, and the food's better.

jeffisjeff
07-30-2010, 03:03 PM
My university that I attended for undergrad was atop a mountain, which was a @&HS!@ to get to everyday. My university expanded after I graduated. They now have a campus in a suburban mall and I would've LOVED to attend. The food's better, it's easier to get to, easier to find parking, and the food's better.

Hmm, pretty sure I know the university you are talking about. In BC, right? My husband and I almost interviewed for faculty jobs there a few years ago, but we weren't crazy about the whole multiple campus / mall aspect, so we declined. :shuffle:

GarrAarghHrumph
07-30-2010, 04:26 PM
:eek: Well, then, I would hate to see that writing from the lower level brick and mortar colleges. Because I have had the exact opposite experience with former U of P students.

You would hate to see the student writing at lower level brick and mortar colleges. It's torture.

GarrAarghHrumph
07-30-2010, 04:32 PM
I knew someone that went to u o p and saw their class... it was a message board where they just wrote a paragraph for their assignments, really basic type questions. I know not all classes are prob like that but still I thought it was ridiculous.

Most U of P classes require students to:

1) post a paragraph in response to two discussion questions per week, 200 words or more

2) post at least two paragraphs per day, for 4/5 out of 7 days, in response to other student or the teacher's posts - 100 words or more each response

3) write at least one 1500-2500 individual short paper per week

4) compose, with their team, a 2500+ word group paper each week

5) final exam, 1-3 hours

6) final group project, which can be 15,000 words or more.

The workload isn't small. I think that the paragraph you saw the student write was likely a short, 100 word response to what another student had posted.

In the lower level classes, the questions are pretty basic, I'm thinking. In the upper division classes, they tend to be more meaty. But no, it's not Harvard.

Prancer
08-07-2010, 02:40 AM
And some of these schools LIE, LIE, LIE to students.

Busted. (http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/schools/kaplan-college-suspends-admissions-at-pembroke-pines-campus-844816.html?cxntlid=cmg_cntnt_rss)

overedge
08-07-2010, 02:46 AM
Busted. (http://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/schools/kaplan-college-suspends-admissions-at-pembroke-pines-campus-844816.html?cxntlid=cmg_cntnt_rss)

Kaplan is notoriously mercenary. I'm guessing that this campus also had financial performance problems. Because Kaplan would have to shut down a whole lot more campuses than this one if lying were the only issue.

Prancer
08-07-2010, 02:57 AM
Kaplan is notoriously mercenary. I'm guessing that this campus also had financial performance problems. Because Kaplan would have to shut down a whole lot more campuses than this one if lying were the only issue.

I figure that one and the one other one they shut down were just the ones the federal investigators hit. They went into only 15 schools altogether, and they found problems at five schools--the other three weren't Kaplan.