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Wyliefan
02-01-2011, 05:54 PM
The Nook 2 (updated black and white version) is also easy on the eyes, but has had problems with several features.

Would you mind saying a little more about these? Because that's the one I was starting to lean toward, till I read your post.

She doesn't travel internationally, and I don't think she cares too much about bells and whistles. She just wants something she can carry around with her and read books on. She does work the night shift at her job, so if she feels like reading on the way to work, backlighting might be a pretty good thing to have, I guess.

Thanks for all the info!

ryanbfan
02-01-2011, 06:03 PM
I think I have the nook 2. I have a black and white nook, so I'm assuming, especially since I got it last Christmas.

I have no problems with it, I can read everything fine and buying books is not a problem. Other than reading, buying books, and playing sudoku on it, I don't use anything else. Mine has an internet browser but I do not use that feature.

My only complaint about the Nook 2 is I can't read it in the dark... I understand the reasons, but I like to read before going to bed. :)

Prancer
02-01-2011, 06:10 PM
Great post, prancer!

Which e-book format is easiest for those who consult a dictionary regularly? (the fewer clicks / buttons to get there, the better)

Here's a link with a description of the big three: http://www.suite101.com/content/ereaders-for-kids-which-device-has-the-best-dictionary-feature-a329044

With the Nook Color, you press and hold on the word you want defined. A Text Selection toolbar pops up. You tap Look Up on the toolbar, and the definition appears.

I think they mostly work the same general way--touchscreens work essentially like the Nook Color, non-touchscreens work like the Kindle.

orbitz
02-01-2011, 06:13 PM
I own neither. If I was to get one today, however, I would get the Kindle. It is so much lighter and more compact than the Nook; You can really feel the difference between the two when you pick them up.

Prancer
02-01-2011, 06:22 PM
This really depends on your library district and what books you want to read.

Well, I suppose that's true. However, the majority of libraries in the US use Overdrive for their DRM software and Overdrive has sent out at least one press release since Christmas essentially apologizing that there are no books available anywhere, as demand now far exceeds supply.

This is also a subject that is being discussed quite a bit among all the digitial librarians whose blogs and tweets I follow; there simply aren't enough e-books to meet demand nationwide. The consensus among them--academic and public librarians alike--is that the e-book shortage is a problem for people who want to read their books from the library.

Your library may be an exception, but I assure you that it's very rare indeed.


Would you mind saying a little more about these? Because that's the one I was starting to lean toward, till I read your post.

The Nook 2 was rushed into production and came out with a lot of bugs. They've corrected most of them, but there are still some bad devices floating around out there. They have been very good about replacing the bad ones, from what I understand, but it's a still a PITA if you get one of them.


She does work the night shift at her job, so if she feels like reading on the way to work, backlighting might be a pretty good thing to have, I guess.

If she has reasonable lighting, she won't need backlighting with a B&W e-ink reader; she can adjust the lighting on the screen. A lot of people also like attachable book lights for night reading, which seems pretty funny to me :lol:. If she is reading in the dark, then the Nook Color has this night reading feature that turns the page black and text white--VERY easy to read in poor to no light and easy on the eyes. But it's pretty expensive to get just for that, especially if she doesn't do it a lot.

ETA: If you get her a Nook, tell her:

*To download Adobe Digital Editions--this will allow her to download books from other stores and libraries
*To download Calibre--this will allow her to, among other things, convert publisher formats into formats she can use on Nook
*To follow B&N on Facebook for Free e-Book Friday specials and other random specials they run; I got a whole lot of reference books and nonfiction from a recent publisher special that offered 300 free books for one week only

Impromptu
02-01-2011, 06:38 PM
I have had the Nook 2 since last May, and I love it. I bought one for my non-techie mother this year for Christmas - she has arthritis, and she has no problems with the weight. She's pretty happy with it as well.

The nice thing about a Nook is that if you do have problems with it, you can just run into a Barnes and Noble, grab a bookseller, and say "help!"

Prancer
02-01-2011, 06:47 PM
The nice thing about a Nook is that if you do have problems with it, you can just run into a Barnes and Noble, grab a bookseller, and say "help!"

I think that's a huge advantage the Nook has over the Kindle. One of my friends got a bad Nook 2; he took it to the store and they swapped it out on the spot, no questions asked, as soon as he showed them what it was (and wasn't) doing. Amazon is really good about all that, too, but you still have to do everything by mail and phone.

There's a guy I call the Nook Evangelist at my local B&N who gives everyone who buys a Nook a personal lesson in how to use it and even gives people his cell number so they can call him if they have problems :lol:. He used to hang out in the cafe on his own time to help people with the Nook because he loved it so much, and B&N finally gave him a job. I don't think I've ever seen anyone so in love with an electronic device.

Another nice thing about the Nook is that when you go into a B&N, its little antennae pop up and it says, "Hello, mothership" and offers you coupons for the cafe. You can also read books online in the store for an hour while you drink your latte and eat cheesecake, although your selection of what you can read is very limited (something they don't tell you in the sales pitch),

Wyliefan
02-01-2011, 06:50 PM
Oh, I have. I got an iPad for days when I have to be away from my computer, and every time I bring it to the office, the men go into spasms of excitement. "Look, there she is with her iPad!!!" I'm starting to feel like nothing more than a walking electronic device. :lol: Me, I mostly see gadgets as a necessary evil!

Prancer
02-01-2011, 06:54 PM
Oh, I have. I got an iPad for days when I have to be away from my computer, and every time I bring it to the office, the men go into spasms of excitement. "Look, there she is with her iPad!!!"

:lol::lol::lol:

Yeah, I've seen that, and nothing seems to get people going like iPads.

But this guy had another job and would come in to B&N after work just to hang and talk Nook with people. That's something I've never seen anyone do. And he took a pay cut to take this job.

I think he's crazy, but if I have a question, he's the guy who will know the answer.

modern_muslimah
02-01-2011, 06:57 PM
This really depends on your library district and what books you want to read.

I was thinking the same thing. I've been able to borrow e-books from my library (downloaded onto iPod touch) with no problem. I do agree that e-book selection for my library is rather limited compared to paper books. In the future though, e-book selections for libraries will increase though right?

Prancer, do you have any librarian contacts for the Free Library of Philadelphia? I've read that they offer library card to non-residents for $15 and that this allows anyone outside of Philly to access their e-books. I've also heard their e-book selection is pretty good. I was just wondering how accurate this is.

modern_muslimah
02-01-2011, 06:58 PM
But this guy had another job and would come in to B&N after work just to hang and talk Nook with people. That's something I've never seen anyone do. And he took a pay cut to take this job.

I think he's crazy, but if I have a question, he's the guy who will know the answer.

:lol: Wow! That's umm, interesting.

Prancer
02-01-2011, 07:08 PM
In the future though, e-book selections for libraries will increase though right?

No doubt; the whole e-book thing is still in its infancy, and libraries aren't all caught up yet.

Neither are publishers or authors. Publishers still aren't sure of how this is all going to work and some authors just refuse to participate. Audrey Niffenegger, for example, is completely against having her books converted to and sold in e-format because she does not believe that e-readers are aesthetically beautiful.

E-books right now are about where music was back in the days of Napster; no one knows what they're doing yet. But this is clearly the wave of the future and the prediction is that e-readers will become more iPad like, and less Kindle-ish because the market of people who just want to read is relatively small.


Prancer, do you have any librarian contacts for the Free Library of Philadelphia? I've read that they offer library card to non-residents for $15 and that this allows anyone outside of Philly to access their e-books. I've also heard their e-book selection is pretty good. I was just wondering how accurate this is.

Nope, no contacts there. But the library card for out-of-staters is listed here: http://libwww.freelibrary.org/register/getcard1.cfm so that part of it is true, at least.

Now I have to check out their catalogue :).

judiz
02-01-2011, 08:16 PM
I absolutely love my kindle, the only issues are it freezes when the battery gets low and, if you buy a cover that clips into the side of the kindle, you can short circuit the kindle. The clips come in contact with the kindle's wires. Avoid covers that clip into the kindle.

JasperBoy
02-01-2011, 08:55 PM
Does anyone have anything to say about Chapters/Indigo Kobo?

Impromptu
02-01-2011, 09:31 PM
Does anyone have anything to say about Chapters/Indigo Kobo?

Isn't that from Borders? I haven't heard anything about the reader specifically, but I had heard that Borders was very much in trouble these days ... so people who buy a Kobo through Borders risk getting a machine with no support.