PDA

View Full Version : The latest round of "How corrupt is the NCAA?"



deltask8er
07-22-2010, 11:31 PM
I've never been into following or watching college football or basketball. Knowing that athletes need to follow a million rules, are not allowed to be paid in cash while coaches and TV networks are making the most incredible amount of money makes me even less interested in the sports.

NCAA violations tarnished the shining successes of Mike Garrett's career at USC

http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-0721-mike-garrett-20100721,0,7800965.story


There's some interesting reading at the end of a memo from the president-elect of the University of Southern California, C.L. Max Nikias. The memo was sent today to members of the "USC Trojan family," to announce that Pat Haden will replace Mike Garrett as athletic director.

But the memo also discloses a persona non grata attitude toward the two superstars whose time on campus helped lead to NCAA sanctions, O.J. Mayo and Reggie Bush. In Bush's case, the memo says the school intends to return his Heisman Trophy:

http://www.usatoday.com/communities/gameon/post/2010/07/usc-reggie-bush-heisman-trophy/1



USC is giving back Reggie Bush’s Heisman Trophy. Call me when Pete Carroll gives back a dime. Call me when USC offers a refund to all the people who purchased Reggie Bush jerseys.

Call me when the phony moralizing stops and we, the media, quit demonizing black kids for cashing in like white men.

http://msn.foxsports.com/collegefootball/story/jason-whitlock-expose-ncaa-not-reggie-bush-072210?GT1=39002

And I remember hearing sports writer David Dupree say on a sports TV show years ago "...you can search the bowels of the most despicable governments in this world, and you will NOT find an organization more corrupt than the NCAA". :eek: :lol: :( http://www.usatoday.com/community/tags/reporter.aspx?id=141


Any current or former NCAA athletes here, of any sport?

CaptCrunch
07-23-2010, 12:17 AM
NCAA is the most 2-faced organization in sports. Almost as bad as the ISU. :)

Players can't make a dime yet they help fill stadiums so all these colleges can make bookoo bucks with their football teams.

The recent conference realignment in college football was all about $$$. God forbid college players try to make a buck for themselves too.

OlieRow
07-23-2010, 01:48 PM
While I'm sure there is lots of corruption in the NCAA, it's not entirely true to say that the players "can't make a dime" while everyone else is getting rich. They are getting scholarships to schools that many of them (at least for football/basketball) wouldn't be able to attend otherwise. Are they drawing a salary? No, but if they fully embrace the opportunity they'll receive a college education and learn many more life lessons on the playing field. Plus LOADS of gear, bowl game goodies, etc.

Coco
07-23-2010, 03:26 PM
OlieRow, I see where you are coming from, but when you consider that their abilities to take the courses they really want to take are severely curtailed in many cases, they aren't getting the great opportunity it would appear to be.

A lot of the situations D-1 athletes in revenue sports such as football and basketball are put in are just flat out wrong. Many of them are left with lifelong injuries and degrees that just aren't profitable.

And then all those stupid rules - which haven't cleaned up the big sports - hamstring the non-revenue & olympic sports like gymnastics and swimming. It's a mess.

KHenry14
07-25-2010, 11:20 PM
Another problem that the NCAA has is that there is no punishment for the players who take the money or perks. OJ Mayo knew he'd be at USC for one year, so he wasn't risking anything by taking the money. What were they going to do to him? Take away eligibility that he doesn't need or want? Also, since this stuff usually appears well after the player has left the school, the player is pretty much bullet proof. So why not take the inducements, the only thing that can get hurt is the school. And I guarantee you OJ Mayo and Reggie Bush could care less that USC got hammered. They've got their millions and will earn much more over the next few years. While the school, and the remaining underclassmen pay the price for their greed.

The only thing I think they could do is sic the IRS on them for not reporting the cars, cash or housing as income.

HBSS
11-04-2010, 04:57 PM
Should the NCAA be able to set artificial limits on scholarships given to student-athletes? Should they be able to deny scholarship renewals for any reason including staffing changes and injuries? I work with attorneys who believe NCAA engages in illegal practices that puts profound financial pressure on college athletes. If you are a student-athlete at a NCAA-affiliated university and had your scholarship terminated, please visit hbsslaw.com/ncaa-antitrust for more information.

PDilemma
11-04-2010, 05:59 PM
While I'm sure there is lots of corruption in the NCAA, it's not entirely true to say that the players "can't make a dime" while everyone else is getting rich. They are getting scholarships to schools that many of them (at least for football/basketball) wouldn't be able to attend otherwise. Are they drawing a salary? No, but if they fully embrace the opportunity they'll receive a college education and learn many more life lessons on the playing field. Plus LOADS of gear, bowl game goodies, etc.

Graduating from college with no debt is a big payoff. Anyone who thinks it isn't is not in touch with reality.

And around here, the big stars make money from endorsement deals beginning about two minutes after their eligibility ends. Some of them make it for the rest of their lives. There's still a player from the early 70s that is on commercials and makes public appearances for pay.

Coco
11-06-2010, 12:53 AM
"Full rides" apparently don't cover 100% of the costs associated with attending a school. Inevitably, this coupled with a schedule that precludes significant income from a part time job can create financial pressure.

http://www.philly.com/inquirer/opinion/20101105_Inquirer_Editorial__No__free_rides__for_a thletes.html

Jayar
11-09-2010, 06:33 PM
I went to a very tiny Division I school on the east coast, and was friends with several of the scholarshipped athletes. In addition, I was a manager at the student center on campus which had the only alternative to the dining hall on campus. What I learned while I was a student:

(1) The student-athletes on scholarship got full tuition, room and board, and books for five years. (They paid $0 to attend.)

(2) If you were a hardship case on scholarship, you received a clothing allowance from American Outfitters so that you had new clothing to travel to away games.

(3) You were not permitted to work an on-campus job, but somehow you had cash after post-game mixers.

(4) The campus had a meal transfer program in case you missed a meal. Anyone with a signed permission form could transfer their meal to the student center which had extended hours and a limited menu. As a paying student, I was permitted $3 for lunch and $4.25 for dinner. As a scholarship athlete, you were allowed to order as much as you wanted without charge. The costs were covered by boosters (illegally I am sure).

(5) You need not attend class like the rest of the students. We had an attendance policy that was enforced with gusto. Missing one class in a semester reduced your grade by one full letter (I missed graduating summa cum laude by missing classes)... athletes could miss due to away games (with good reason), but could also take 'recovery' time. Some profs gave exemptions to students who earned an A throughout the semester from taking the final. I had an A in several classes like that, but I had to take the final. Strangely, no athlete ever showed up for the final and they got As. (Even though one friend was a C student and was told not to show up... he would get an A and he did.)

It was very crooked... Remind me to tell you about the time one student on the golf team played in a tourney against Harvard and Yale and cheated on her score card. That was good times.