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KatieC
06-30-2011, 04:18 AM
That's disgraceful.

Was the first book published in Great Britain before the U.S.? I would have thought so.

Marge_Simpson
06-30-2011, 07:14 AM
The HP Lexicon used to have a list of all the differences between the British and American versions, but it was shut down after JKR's lawsuit.
I found this list, but it's only for the first book:
http://home.comcast.net/~helenajole/Harry.html

MacMadame
06-30-2011, 11:27 AM
I read the UK version of Philosopher's Stone after reading the US version and I didn't see a lot of differences. It was mostly in the spelling of words, not the words themselves.

The only thing that really jumped out at me is that the kids were always "revising" instead of "studying".

IceAlisa
06-30-2011, 03:31 PM
Perhaps to sound more magical? Wikipedia says "Scholastic thought that a child would not want to read a book with the word "philosopher" in the title." They also made Jo Rowling go by J.K., thinking that more people would pick it up if they were unaware that she was a woman. :rolleyes:

Really??? :scream:

kwanatic
06-30-2011, 03:53 PM
I read the UK version of Philosopher's Stone after reading the US version and I didn't see a lot of differences. It was mostly in the spelling of words, not the words themselves.

The only thing that really jumped out at me is that the kids were always "revising" instead of "studying".

I'm thinking it was reasons like that that led to two different versions being released. In the US we speak English; in the UK they speak English. Same language? Yes? Words and phrases with different meanings? Absolutely. Certain things have to be translated to fit, otherwise people are left scratching their head as to the meaning.

IMO, Sorcerer's Stone sounds better than Philosopher's Stone; plus the fact that the word sorcerer makes you think of magic...it probably connected better with American audiences than philosopher would. I hear philosopher and think Aristotle, Plato, etc.

But I'm just a stupid American, so what do I know. :D

FigureSpins
06-30-2011, 04:10 PM
There are certain slang phrases and expressions that were also changed. I made a note of them at some point - I'll have to see if I can find my list. It was almost as if the context of a paragraph was different and made more sense in the UK version than it did in the US version. The US substitute phrases reworked the tone of the section I'm thinking about. When I read the UK version, it suddenly made more sense.

rfisher
06-30-2011, 04:58 PM
I was always curious how the wizarding children knew current slang. I guess they could learn it from the muggle borns, but as they don't listen Muggle music, TV or even radio, or have much contact with Muggles in general, how'd they know? :lol: Just something I've spent time pondering.

FigureSpins
06-30-2011, 05:51 PM
If you check out http://bit.ly/jZOnHl you'll see a preview of Pottermore.com

victoriaheidi
06-30-2011, 06:21 PM
There are certain slang phrases and expressions that were also changed. I made a note of them at some point - I'll have to see if I can find my list. It was almost as if the context of a paragraph was different and made more sense in the UK version than it did in the US version. The US substitute phrases reworked the tone of the section I'm thinking about. When I read the UK version, it suddenly made more sense.

I noticed this in another book...no, wait, it's the Les Miserables musical.

When Boublil and Schonberg first began the musical, they wrote an absolutely stunning French album. If you've never listened to it, now's the time (especially if you speak French)...in particular, I love "L'un Vers L'autre" (predecessor to "On My Own"). But the whole CD has this very Victor Hugo feel (there's a line in that song that says something like, "even a blind man could see it in his heart," such a poetic and gorgeous line).

Les Mis is one of my favorites, but that French album is a work of art in itself, and the English songs and lyrics don't always match up to the original French.

Totally off-track, but what you said about the UK HPs (which I really, REALLY want, since I don't have my own set of books!) really made me think of Les Mis.

Marge_Simpson
06-30-2011, 06:52 PM
There are certain slang phrases and expressions that were also changed. I made a note of them at some point - I'll have to see if I can find my list. It was almost as if the context of a paragraph was different and made more sense in the UK version than it did in the US version. The US substitute phrases reworked the tone of the section I'm thinking about. When I read the UK version, it suddenly made more sense.

I have both versions of all the books, and I completely agree with you. The US "translations" sound very silly in many places.
Example: In POA, when Ron is describing how he was almost attacked by Sirius while he was sleeping, he says that he yelled, and Sirius scarpered. (ie, he ran off)
In the American version, it was changed to "scampered".
Sirius scampering off just sounds wrong, IMO.

rfisher
06-30-2011, 06:55 PM
I love "scarpered." I'm going to start finding ways to use it everyday. :D

Lara
06-30-2011, 07:11 PM
I never heard of the word, but only had the Canadian edition of PoA so I suspect I must have been reading it as scampered in my head anyway. :o :lol: Now I want to check!

victoriaheidi
06-30-2011, 09:17 PM
I have both versions of all the books, and I completely agree with you. The US "translations" sound very silly in many places.
Example: In POA, when Ron is describing how he was almost attacked by Sirius while he was sleeping, he says that he yelled, and Sirius scarpered. (ie, he ran off)
In the American version, it was changed to "scampered".
Sirius scampering off just sounds wrong, IMO.

Haha, I see what you mean! Yeah, I've read the American books, but since I don't own any of them, maybe I should buy the UK versions.

vesperholly
06-30-2011, 11:58 PM
HP Lexicon is still up and running. The links are a bit obscure, but they still exist:

Philosopher's Stone (http://www.hp-lexicon.org/about/books/ps/differences-ps.html)
Chamber of Secrets (http://www.hp-lexicon.org/about/books/cs/differences-cs.html)
Prisoner of Azkaban (http://www.hp-lexicon.org/about/books/pa/differences-pa.html)
Goblet of Fire (http://www.hp-lexicon.org/about/books/gf/differences-gf.html)
Order of the Phoenix (http://www.hp-lexicon.org/about/books/op/differences-op.html)
Half-Blood Prince (http://www.hp-lexicon.org/about/books/hbp/differences-hbp.html)
Deathly Hallows (http://www.hp-lexicon.org/about/books/dh/differences-dh.html)

aka_gerbil
07-04-2011, 03:22 AM
I'm having one of those moments where I'm hoping the collective knowledge of FSU proves far more useful than Google is being at the moment.

My best friend and I had planned on seeing the Deathly Hallows pt. 2 on IMAX. We were thinking there would be a regular 2D IMAX version, but all we can find is the 3D version. Neither one of us really liked 3D all that much.

Does anyone know if there is a regular, 2D version of IMAX, or if the 3D is it? Also, if the 3D is it, are there just select scenes that are in 3D, or the whole thing? If it's the whole thing, can we watch without the glasses and it be 2D?

Thanks in advance (for answering all of my dumb questions)!